Tottenham face anxious wait on Harry Kane’s fitness for Carabao Cup final

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<span>Photograph: Jon Super/PA</span>
Photograph: Jon Super/PA

Tottenham face an anxious wait to discover whether Harry Kane will be fit for the Carabao Cup final after the striker limped out of the 2-2 draw at Everton with a foot injury.

Kane scored his 20th and 21st goals of the Premier League season at Goodison Park, where Gylfi Sigurdsson also struck twice for the hosts, but was forced off in stoppage time after Richarlison landed on his foot at a corner. The Spurs striker will be assessed on Saturday, with José Mourinho desperate for positive news before next Sunday’s Wembley final against Manchester City.

Related: Tottenham’s Kane and Everton’s Sigurdsson hit doubles in thrilling draw

“For him to leave the pitch with a few minutes to go is obviously because he felt something,” the Spurs manager said. “It is too early to say something. I don’t want to feed any speculation or be stupidly optimistic and say that he will play in the next game [against Southampton in midweek] or the final. I don’t know. He doesn’t know. Tomorrow we will see how it reacts and take a look in more detail.”

Kane capitalised on two dreadful defensive mistakes by Everton to put Spurs ahead and then equalise in the second half. “It was great finishing,” said Mourinho. “It’s the kind of player that when you see the first touch and the control, we are used to seeing it in training and we know it is fantastic finishing. Two beautiful goals but not a surprise for the ones who see him do it every day in training.”

The Spurs manager, however, was unhappy with Michael Oliver’s decision to award Everton a first-half penalty when James Rodríguez went down under minimal contact from Sergio Reguilón. “The penalty was not a penalty,” he insisted. “I think the players should be praised [for not haranguing Oliver over the decision] but we all have the feeling that it is very difficult for VAR to go against a referee’s decision. They don’t like to expose each other.

“The maximum they like to tell the referee is: ‘Come on, have a look,’ but when Mr Oliver is in such high speed to the penalty spot I don’t think there is any point complaining.”

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