Unique photo series offers bird's-eye view of people who work with their hands

Many hands make light work, and in this photographer’s unique series, there are many, many of them. Sanwal Deen’s “Work” project offers a bird’s-eye view of the elaborate tasks carried out by people who work with their hands.

With just forearms and hands showing, Sanwal’s images showcase the work carried out by florists, writers and bakers; pianists, typesetters and cobblers.

It is estimated that the average person spends around one-third of his or her life working, and so Sanwal, 27, wanted to show the intricacy of certain professions that can help define someone. (Caters News)

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Unique photo series offers bird’s-eye view of people who work with their hands

Kirsten — florist
Many hands make light work, and in this photographer’s unique series, there are many, many of them. (Photo: Sanwal Deen/Caters News)

Unique photo series offers bird’s-eye view of people who work with their hands

Nicolas — typesetter
With just forearms and hands showing, Sanwal’s images showcase the work carried out by florists, writers and bakers; pianists, typesetters and cobblers. (Photo: Sanwal Deen/Caters News)

Unique photo series offers bird’s-eye view of people who work with their hands

Greene — butcher
“Having had some time to reflect on the series, I think that subconsciously I am also trying to understand for myself what work is and what entails.” (Photo: Sanwal Deen/Caters News)

Unique photo series offers bird’s-eye view of people who work with their hands

Perry — baker
The first shot in the series was taken in May 2017, and having shot all of his images in America, the photographer plans to visit more continents and capture more diverse jobs. (Photo: Sanwal Deen/Caters News)

Unique photo series offers bird’s-eye view of people who work with their hands

The Fish — Japanese taiko player
He said: “For this series, I think reaching out to people and gaining access to the workspace was the most challenging part. (Photo: Sanwal Deen/Caters News)

Unique photo series offers bird’s-eye view of people who work with their hands

Audrey — hairdresser
In total, the photographer shot 11 professions, titling the images with simply the first name of the person carrying out the task. (Photo: Sanwal Deen/Caters News)

Unique photo series offers bird’s-eye view of people who work with their hands

Maggie — writer and historian
It is estimated that the average person spends around one-third of his or her life working, and so Sanwal, 27, wanted to show the intricacy of certain professions that can help define someone. (Photo: Sanwal Deen/Caters News)

Unique photo series offers bird’s-eye view of people who work with their hands

Stone —auto mechanic
Sanwal Deen’s “Work” project offers a bird’s-eye view of the elaborate tasks carried out by people who work with their hands. (Photo: Sanwal Deen/Caters News)

Unique photo series offers bird’s-eye view of people who work with their hands

Martha — pianist
Sanwal said: “I have always had a fascination with desks and workspaces. I thought that looking at different workspaces throughout the world might be a good way to get my message across.” (Photo: Sanwal Deen/Caters News)

Unique photo series offers bird’s-eye view of people who work with their hands

Allison — bookmaker
“Other than that, the images themselves require a quite elaborate and space-consuming setup. They were taken during active business hours, and sometimes I was getting in the way of business.”€ (Photo: Sanwal Deen/Caters News)

Unique photo series offers bird’s-eye view of people who work with their hands

Ralph — cobbler
Sanwal, from Columbus, Ohio, said that he hopes to eventually turn his “Work” images into a book, featuring interviews with those photographed and portrait images, too. (Photo: Sanwal Deen/Caters News)

Unique photo series offers bird’s-eye view of people who work with their hands

Sanwal — writer
“Finding a way to quickly set up, take the picture, and leave without causing too much trouble was the hardest part of this process.” (Photo: Sanwal Deen/Caters News)