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BEIJING, CHINA - AUGUST 23: Usain Bolt of Jamaica (C) wins gold ahead of (L-R) Andre De Grasse of Canada, Asafa Powell of Jamaica, Justin Gatlin of the United States, Tyson Gay of the United States, Mike Rodgers of the United States, Trayvon Bromell of the United States, Bingtian Su of China and Jimmy Vicaut of France cross the finish line in the Men's 100 metres final during day two of the 15th IAAF World Athletics Championships Beijing 2015 at Beijing National Stadium on August 23, 2015 in Beijing, China. (Photo by Ian Walton/Getty Images)

Usain Bolt's Decade-Long Party Reaches the Finish Line

On Saturday at the world championships of track and field in London, Usain Bolt will run what he has said repeatedly—for the better part of five years—will be the last individual race of his career, in the final of the 100 meters. He is expected to run on Jamaica’s 4X100-meter relay a week later, which will be his final appearance on any track. And then he will be gone.

Probably. Let’s get this out of the way right up here: I understand that there is cynicism about Bolt’s retirement and a smirking assumption that he will unretire at some point. Sure. Maybe he will. He’s only 30 years old (31 on Aug. 21) and there’s still good money in being Bolt on the track. But I think there’s a good chance this retirement will take. The usual reason: Bolt has never loved training and he can finally put that behind him. (He also doesn’t love daylong photo shoots and many of the other duties required of millionaire celebrity athletes, although he’s all about many of the other perks). A more tangible reason: He’s older and slower—Bolt has run faster than 9.80 seconds in the 100 meters only twice since the 2012 Olympics, at the finals of the 2013 and ’15 worlds. His winning time in Rio was 9.81. His untouchable world record of 9.58 is eight years old.

He has spent a decade or more managing chronic back issues. The job of being Bolt, while still lucrative, is more difficult. Even if he were to stick around, there’s no guarantee that he will keep winning races. There’s no guarantee that he will win Saturday (although the rest of the world hasn’t torn up the 100 meters this year, either; Bolt’s best is only 9.95, but the only sub 9.90 performance this year was a 9.82 by 21-year-old Christian Coleman of the U.S. two months ago at the NCAA Championship meet in Eugene. The withdrawal of Canadian Andre DeGrasse this week further weakened the field). Superman Bolt is done. It’s hard to imagine him grinding out another year or two, or all the way to 2020, running in the 9.90s and leaning at the tape to win races. But he could. I’m just betting it won’t happen.

So let’s assume this is the end. We as a sports culture are accustomed to saying goodbye to athletes. The routine is well-practiced. Highlights, memories, a final flash of brilliance. Applause. Laughter. Tears. Curtain drops. We are insulated from genuine, deep sadness by the security that comes from knowing that greatness replaces itself. Bird and Magic left, Jordan came along. Jordan left, Lebron came along, and then Curry. Etcetera. Pick your sport. Track and field, which unfolds in ponderous afternoons and evenings, translated—but also burdened—by arcane statistics and worshipped by an increasingly vertical audience (like many Olympic sports in this regard), derives any crossover appeal from the superstars who periodically arrive at the starting line and nudge their way into mainstream. Bolt arrived, as a superstar, in 2008. And he didn’t nudge his way anywhere; he exploded.

It started with a single race, the 2008 Olympic 100-meter final in Beijing. On that night Bolt separated from the fastest men in the world—all of them athletic freaks, let’s be honest—with stunning ease. He unfurled his entire 6'4" frame and swallowed ground in giant chunks. (I’ve since seen this effect, close-up, in training; it’s intoxicating, like CGI in real life. Spikes ripping over the track, a body passing, generating a breeze. Bolt is not just fast, he’s a weather system). What Bolt did after that race was even more significant: He danced, posed and partied. And that party has gone on for a decade. His races are like concerts, building to a crescendo at the gun, followed by a long, satisfying encore, with selfies for all. He has been the rare athlete who seems both transcendent and accessible, and he has made it all look fun (it has been) and easy (it hasn’t been).

And never forget this: Bolt has been at his absolute best under the withering pressure of championship sprinting. He ran 21 global championship races from 2008-16, the 100 meters, 200 meters and 4X100-meter relay at three Olympics and four world championships, and won 19 of them. His two losses resulted from a false start at the 100 meters in the 2011 worlds and from the disqualification of a Jamaican teammate who tested positive for steroids after the 4X100-meter relay at the 2008 Olympics. His three fastest 100-meter times, and five fastest 200-meter times, and all three of his world records, came in championship competition.

So let’s be clear about this: There is no replacing Usain Bolt.

This is where the narrative turns less cheery. In these last 10, rollicking years, Bolt has become the most famous and successful track and field athlete in history, a wealthy international celebrity who is almost universally beloved. But in those 10 years, Bolt has not made track and field more popular, he has made Usain Bolt more popular, and fabulously so. The residual effect will be negligible. When Bolt leaves, he takes his popularity with him and closes the door on his way out. (Yes, track officials have expressed a desire for Bolt to remain present, and perhaps there’s something to be gained from having Bolt in the stadium for future meets, but nobody wants to watch Springsteen sitting in the front row tapping his feet; they want to watch him sing "Jungleland.").

On the occasion of Bolt’s retirement, it’s worth thinking about the state of track and field before Bolt went viral in Beijing. (Bolt had been a promising sprint prodigy in his teens, but he became something else altogether in ’08). In 2006, Justin Gatlin of the U.S., the fresh-scrubbed Olympic 100-meter gold medalist from 2004 and newly minted world record holder, was nailed for a positive PED test and slapped with an eight-year ban (eventually reduced to four years). Gatlin was in many ways the new face of track and field, expected to help guide the sport away from the Marion Jones debacle. (Track is always seeking to distance itself from the latest doping scandal… more on this to come).

In the summer of 2007, Tyson Gay of the U.S. won the 100, 200 and 4X100 relay at the worlds in Osaka, Japan. But Gay was a reticent star (and would later suffer his own steroid indignity). It was Bolt who made everyone forget about Gatlin and all the other doping scandals, and he has been performing some form of this duty for a decade. Bolt has been track’s safe space, where the sport’s fans go to forget about doping and diminishing widespread appeal. Systemic Russian doping scandal? No problem, we’ve got Bolt. Nike Oregon Project embroiled in controversy? No problem, we’ve got Bolt.

For every problem posed, Bolt has been the answer. And a good answer. A life-affirming answer. An answer that makes you smile and then laugh.

Yes, I’m aware that a vocal minority in track and field believes that Bolt has been doping all along. He became too fast, too quickly in the 100 meters and dropped his times too far in the 200 meters. Plus, Jamaica’s domestic anti-doping system has been less than rigorous. There’s plenty of circumstantial evidence to carry a conversation about whether Bolt is clean or not. I don’t know if Bolt has been clean throughout his career. I don’t know if any athlete has been clean throughout his or her career, excepting those with positive drug tests, which constitute only a small portion of those who are actually doping. There are other theorists who believe that even if Bolt had been caught, those records would have been quashed by the forces that stand to gain from his continued greatness: Shoe and apparel companies, television networks, international governing bodies. Absent hard evidence, I choose to stand at the opening of that rabbit hole and not venture down. It’s too deep and too dark.

More importantly, the vast majority of the public—track fans and others—have chosen not to question Bolt. He’s infectious. We want his performances to be real, so we convince ourselves that they are. He’s a very tall man with the stride frequency of a smaller man, a bizarre combination of skills that just might enable somebody to run 9.58 seconds for 100 meters. I’ve spent time with Bolt on numerous occasions. I like the guy. Does that mean he’s been clean all these years? Nope. It just means I want to give him the benefit of the doubt and I’m far more cynical than most people watching Bolt run.

The track and field world that Bolt will leave behind next weekend is consumed with the issue of doping, as much as at any time in its history. (On this subject, entering the London meet, I recommend this piece written by Cathal Dennehy in the Irish Independent. U.S. media are intermittently diligent in addressing the specter of doping in track and field; European media—and fans—are relentless).

For a long time, track meets around the world have been conducted in a shadow of doping innuendo that just sucks the joy out of the competition. Whenever a time is just a little too fast, eye rolls cause the bleachers to sway. It’s a thing. A very real thing, and not just among media. Among athletes, too. It’s so ingrained in the culture of the sport that everybody just speaks in a sort of doping shorthand.

The Russian scandal, along with the revelations of inadequate testing in Ethiopia, Jamaica and Kenya have created a sense of almost overwhelming cynicism. Jama Aden of Somalia, a former world class runner who now coaches Ethiopian world record holder Genzebe Dibaba, was arrested last summer and doping materials were found in the room of one of his assistants. (Yet Dibaba has never tested positive). Coach Alberto Salazar, a legendary name in U.S. distance running, and the Nike Oregon Project remain under investigation by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency.

During the London worlds, more than three dozen athletes will receive reallocated medals that are the result of retroactive doping disqualifications from previous world championships. Among them is Kara Goucher, who won the bronze medal at the 2007 worlds (a breakthrough performance that in many ways started the rebirth of U.S, distance and middle-distance running). Goucher has been elevated to the silver through the disqualification of second-place finisher Elvan Abeylegesse of Turkey. Francena McCorory of the U.S. will receive a bronze medal from the 2011 400 meters (she had finished fourth) and the U.S. women’s 4X400-meter relay from 2013 will be elevated from silver to gold.

These are good and righteous corrections. Dopers are stripped and deserving athletes are rewarded. But, sadly, and there is no way around this, these ceremonies also serve to focus on the reality that, in the moment, what track fans are watching is often not genuine. Reallocation is a paper correction. Nobody can give Goucher the joy of crossing that line second or McCorory the thrill of winning an individual medal at a world championship. Nobody can refill the stadium and give the fans an untainted competition.

It’s important to say that track and field is trying to cleanse itself. The enormity of that task can be dispiriting, but more to the point in the present, it leaves the sport in a constant state of painful transition. Only by talking about eradicating doping can doping be eradicated, but that talk keeps the spotlight on doping and deepens the sense that track is irretrievably dirty. (It’s not; many athletes compete clean). Reallocation is big these days. It’s important and just. But it can get out of hand, too. Last week the London Daily Mail published a story, pegged to the five-year anniversary of the London Olympics and the return of the sport for the 2017 worlds, asking if the track and field competition in 2012 was "the dirtiest ever." The Daily Mail research concluded that 87 London finalists—one out of every seven—had previously committed a doping offense and that another 138 had a "connection" to doping, through a coach or agent or mention in the release of documents by the hacking group Fancy Bears.

Subsequently, former U.S. hurdler Lolo Jones tweeted this:

And then this:

Jones finished fourth in the 100-meter hurdles in London, an impressive performance after an injury- and drama-filled season. (You might remember). The three women who finished in front of her that night were Sally Pearson of Australia (gold), Dawn Harper of the U.S. (silver) and Kellie Wells of the U.S. (bronze). The only connection to doping for any of these three women came in February of 2017, when Harper received a three-month suspension, after a masking agent was found in a urine specimen collected in December of 2016. It’s not good that Harper had a masking agent in her urine, but does it make sense that Jones is apparently asking for Harper’s medal from more than four years earlier? This is among the unintended consequences of aggressive reallocation. If you happen to chat up Salazar at a pub, somebody’s gonna come after your medals from back in the day.

Back to the original point: Usain Bolt gave the sport regular and euphoric reprieves from the drumbeat of doping investigation and reveals. When he ran, there was almost exclusively elation. His departure leaves only more room for the negative.

It would be reassuring to suggest that there is an athlete in line to replace Bolt. The logical choice is long sprinter Wayde van Niekerk of South Africa. Last summer in Rio, Van Niekerk’s world record 43.03 in the 400 meters, from the blind Siberia of Lane 8, was one of the most remarkable footraces ever run by anyone, anywhere. He is a stunningly gifted athlete who, barring injury, is likely to become the first human to run one lap in less than 43 seconds and could possibly challenge Bolt’s world record of 19.19 seconds in the 200 meters. But there are holes in this projection: The 200 and 400 are not the 100, just ask Michael Johnson, who never became quite as famous as Carl Lewis. Also, to be the next Bolt, you have to not only run as fast as Bolt has run, but you have to do with Bolt’s style. Van Niekerk is reticent and humble, the kind of athlete who would hand the football to referee after scoring and softly thank God and family afterward. Which is all fine.

And the truth is, nobody has Bolt’s style. Nobody looks like Bolt running down the track, nobody rolls like Bolt afterward. He has been one of a kind and he will remain one of a kind. His presence gave track and field a 10-year reprieve, and now that reprieve is over.

Usain Bolt's Decade-Long Party Reaches the Finish Line

On Saturday at the world championships of track and field in London, Usain Bolt will run what he has said repeatedly—for the better part of five years—will be the last individual race of his career, in the final of the 100 meters. He is expected to run on Jamaica’s 4X100-meter relay a week later, which will be his final appearance on any track. And then he will be gone.

Probably. Let’s get this out of the way right up here: I understand that there is cynicism about Bolt’s retirement and a smirking assumption that he will unretire at some point. Sure. Maybe he will. He’s only 30 years old (31 on Aug. 21) and there’s still good money in being Bolt on the track. But I think there’s a good chance this retirement will take. The usual reason: Bolt has never loved training and he can finally put that behind him. (He also doesn’t love daylong photo shoots and many of the other duties required of millionaire celebrity athletes, although he’s all about many of the other perks). A more tangible reason: He’s older and slower—Bolt has run faster than 9.80 seconds in the 100 meters only twice since the 2012 Olympics, at the finals of the 2013 and ’15 worlds. His winning time in Rio was 9.81. His untouchable world record of 9.58 is eight years old.

He has spent a decade or more managing chronic back issues. The job of being Bolt, while still lucrative, is more difficult. Even if he were to stick around, there’s no guarantee that he will keep winning races. There’s no guarantee that he will win Saturday (although the rest of the world hasn’t torn up the 100 meters this year, either; Bolt’s best is only 9.95, but the only sub 9.90 performance this year was a 9.82 by 21-year-old Christian Coleman of the U.S. two months ago at the NCAA Championship meet in Eugene. The withdrawal of Canadian Andre DeGrasse this week further weakened the field). Superman Bolt is done. It’s hard to imagine him grinding out another year or two, or all the way to 2020, running in the 9.90s and leaning at the tape to win races. But he could. I’m just betting it won’t happen.

So let’s assume this is the end. We as a sports culture are accustomed to saying goodbye to athletes. The routine is well-practiced. Highlights, memories, a final flash of brilliance. Applause. Laughter. Tears. Curtain drops. We are insulated from genuine, deep sadness by the security that comes from knowing that greatness replaces itself. Bird and Magic left, Jordan came along. Jordan left, Lebron came along, and then Curry. Etcetera. Pick your sport. Track and field, which unfolds in ponderous afternoons and evenings, translated—but also burdened—by arcane statistics and worshipped by an increasingly vertical audience (like many Olympic sports in this regard), derives any crossover appeal from the superstars who periodically arrive at the starting line and nudge their way into mainstream. Bolt arrived, as a superstar, in 2008. And he didn’t nudge his way anywhere; he exploded.

It started with a single race, the 2008 Olympic 100-meter final in Beijing. On that night Bolt separated from the fastest men in the world—all of them athletic freaks, let’s be honest—with stunning ease. He unfurled his entire 6'4" frame and swallowed ground in giant chunks. (I’ve since seen this effect, close-up, in training; it’s intoxicating, like CGI in real life. Spikes ripping over the track, a body passing, generating a breeze. Bolt is not just fast, he’s a weather system). What Bolt did after that race was even more significant: He danced, posed and partied. And that party has gone on for a decade. His races are like concerts, building to a crescendo at the gun, followed by a long, satisfying encore, with selfies for all. He has been the rare athlete who seems both transcendent and accessible, and he has made it all look fun (it has been) and easy (it hasn’t been).

And never forget this: Bolt has been at his absolute best under the withering pressure of championship sprinting. He ran 21 global championship races from 2008-16, the 100 meters, 200 meters and 4X100-meter relay at three Olympics and four world championships, and won 19 of them. His two losses resulted from a false start at the 100 meters in the 2011 worlds and from the disqualification of a Jamaican teammate who tested positive for steroids after the 4X100-meter relay at the 2008 Olympics. His three fastest 100-meter times, and five fastest 200-meter times, and all three of his world records, came in championship competition.

So let’s be clear about this: There is no replacing Usain Bolt.

This is where the narrative turns less cheery. In these last 10, rollicking years, Bolt has become the most famous and successful track and field athlete in history, a wealthy international celebrity who is almost universally beloved. But in those 10 years, Bolt has not made track and field more popular, he has made Usain Bolt more popular, and fabulously so. The residual effect will be negligible. When Bolt leaves, he takes his popularity with him and closes the door on his way out. (Yes, track officials have expressed a desire for Bolt to remain present, and perhaps there’s something to be gained from having Bolt in the stadium for future meets, but nobody wants to watch Springsteen sitting in the front row tapping his feet; they want to watch him sing "Jungleland.").

On the occasion of Bolt’s retirement, it’s worth thinking about the state of track and field before Bolt went viral in Beijing. (Bolt had been a promising sprint prodigy in his teens, but he became something else altogether in ’08). In 2006, Justin Gatlin of the U.S., the fresh-scrubbed Olympic 100-meter gold medalist from 2004 and newly minted world record holder, was nailed for a positive PED test and slapped with an eight-year ban (eventually reduced to four years). Gatlin was in many ways the new face of track and field, expected to help guide the sport away from the Marion Jones debacle. (Track is always seeking to distance itself from the latest doping scandal… more on this to come).

In the summer of 2007, Tyson Gay of the U.S. won the 100, 200 and 4X100 relay at the worlds in Osaka, Japan. But Gay was a reticent star (and would later suffer his own steroid indignity). It was Bolt who made everyone forget about Gatlin and all the other doping scandals, and he has been performing some form of this duty for a decade. Bolt has been track’s safe space, where the sport’s fans go to forget about doping and diminishing widespread appeal. Systemic Russian doping scandal? No problem, we’ve got Bolt. Nike Oregon Project embroiled in controversy? No problem, we’ve got Bolt.

For every problem posed, Bolt has been the answer. And a good answer. A life-affirming answer. An answer that makes you smile and then laugh.

Yes, I’m aware that a vocal minority in track and field believes that Bolt has been doping all along. He became too fast, too quickly in the 100 meters and dropped his times too far in the 200 meters. Plus, Jamaica’s domestic anti-doping system has been less than rigorous. There’s plenty of circumstantial evidence to carry a conversation about whether Bolt is clean or not. I don’t know if Bolt has been clean throughout his career. I don’t know if any athlete has been clean throughout his or her career, excepting those with positive drug tests, which constitute only a small portion of those who are actually doping. There are other theorists who believe that even if Bolt had been caught, those records would have been quashed by the forces that stand to gain from his continued greatness: Shoe and apparel companies, television networks, international governing bodies. Absent hard evidence, I choose to stand at the opening of that rabbit hole and not venture down. It’s too deep and too dark.

More importantly, the vast majority of the public—track fans and others—have chosen not to question Bolt. He’s infectious. We want his performances to be real, so we convince ourselves that they are. He’s a very tall man with the stride frequency of a smaller man, a bizarre combination of skills that just might enable somebody to run 9.58 seconds for 100 meters. I’ve spent time with Bolt on numerous occasions. I like the guy. Does that mean he’s been clean all these years? Nope. It just means I want to give him the benefit of the doubt and I’m far more cynical than most people watching Bolt run.

The track and field world that Bolt will leave behind next weekend is consumed with the issue of doping, as much as at any time in its history. (On this subject, entering the London meet, I recommend this piece written by Cathal Dennehy in the Irish Independent. U.S. media are intermittently diligent in addressing the specter of doping in track and field; European media—and fans—are relentless).

For a long time, track meets around the world have been conducted in a shadow of doping innuendo that just sucks the joy out of the competition. Whenever a time is just a little too fast, eye rolls cause the bleachers to sway. It’s a thing. A very real thing, and not just among media. Among athletes, too. It’s so ingrained in the culture of the sport that everybody just speaks in a sort of doping shorthand.

The Russian scandal, along with the revelations of inadequate testing in Ethiopia, Jamaica and Kenya have created a sense of almost overwhelming cynicism. Jama Aden of Somalia, a former world class runner who now coaches Ethiopian world record holder Genzebe Dibaba, was arrested last summer and doping materials were found in the room of one of his assistants. (Yet Dibaba has never tested positive). Coach Alberto Salazar, a legendary name in U.S. distance running, and the Nike Oregon Project remain under investigation by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency.

During the London worlds, more than three dozen athletes will receive reallocated medals that are the result of retroactive doping disqualifications from previous world championships. Among them is Kara Goucher, who won the bronze medal at the 2007 worlds (a breakthrough performance that in many ways started the rebirth of U.S, distance and middle-distance running). Goucher has been elevated to the silver through the disqualification of second-place finisher Elvan Abeylegesse of Turkey. Francena McCorory of the U.S. will receive a bronze medal from the 2011 400 meters (she had finished fourth) and the U.S. women’s 4X400-meter relay from 2013 will be elevated from silver to gold.

These are good and righteous corrections. Dopers are stripped and deserving athletes are rewarded. But, sadly, and there is no way around this, these ceremonies also serve to focus on the reality that, in the moment, what track fans are watching is often not genuine. Reallocation is a paper correction. Nobody can give Goucher the joy of crossing that line second or McCorory the thrill of winning an individual medal at a world championship. Nobody can refill the stadium and give the fans an untainted competition.

It’s important to say that track and field is trying to cleanse itself. The enormity of that task can be dispiriting, but more to the point in the present, it leaves the sport in a constant state of painful transition. Only by talking about eradicating doping can doping be eradicated, but that talk keeps the spotlight on doping and deepens the sense that track is irretrievably dirty. (It’s not; many athletes compete clean). Reallocation is big these days. It’s important and just. But it can get out of hand, too. Last week the London Daily Mail published a story, pegged to the five-year anniversary of the London Olympics and the return of the sport for the 2017 worlds, asking if the track and field competition in 2012 was "the dirtiest ever." The Daily Mail research concluded that 87 London finalists—one out of every seven—had previously committed a doping offense and that another 138 had a "connection" to doping, through a coach or agent or mention in the release of documents by the hacking group Fancy Bears.

Subsequently, former U.S. hurdler Lolo Jones tweeted this:

And then this:

Jones finished fourth in the 100-meter hurdles in London, an impressive performance after an injury- and drama-filled season. (You might remember). The three women who finished in front of her that night were Sally Pearson of Australia (gold), Dawn Harper of the U.S. (silver) and Kellie Wells of the U.S. (bronze). The only connection to doping for any of these three women came in February of 2017, when Harper received a three-month suspension, after a masking agent was found in a urine specimen collected in December of 2016. It’s not good that Harper had a masking agent in her urine, but does it make sense that Jones is apparently asking for Harper’s medal from more than four years earlier? This is among the unintended consequences of aggressive reallocation. If you happen to chat up Salazar at a pub, somebody’s gonna come after your medals from back in the day.

Back to the original point: Usain Bolt gave the sport regular and euphoric reprieves from the drumbeat of doping investigation and reveals. When he ran, there was almost exclusively elation. His departure leaves only more room for the negative.

It would be reassuring to suggest that there is an athlete in line to replace Bolt. The logical choice is long sprinter Wayde van Niekerk of South Africa. Last summer in Rio, Van Niekerk’s world record 43.03 in the 400 meters, from the blind Siberia of Lane 8, was one of the most remarkable footraces ever run by anyone, anywhere. He is a stunningly gifted athlete who, barring injury, is likely to become the first human to run one lap in less than 43 seconds and could possibly challenge Bolt’s world record of 19.19 seconds in the 200 meters. But there are holes in this projection: The 200 and 400 are not the 100, just ask Michael Johnson, who never became quite as famous as Carl Lewis. Also, to be the next Bolt, you have to not only run as fast as Bolt has run, but you have to do with Bolt’s style. Van Niekerk is reticent and humble, the kind of athlete who would hand the football to referee after scoring and softly thank God and family afterward. Which is all fine.

And the truth is, nobody has Bolt’s style. Nobody looks like Bolt running down the track, nobody rolls like Bolt afterward. He has been one of a kind and he will remain one of a kind. His presence gave track and field a 10-year reprieve, and now that reprieve is over.

Usain Bolt's Decade-Long Party Reaches the Finish Line

On Saturday at the world championships of track and field in London, Usain Bolt will run what he has said repeatedly—for the better part of five years—will be the last individual race of his career, in the final of the 100 meters. He is expected to run on Jamaica’s 4X100-meter relay a week later, which will be his final appearance on any track. And then he will be gone.

Probably. Let’s get this out of the way right up here: I understand that there is cynicism about Bolt’s retirement and a smirking assumption that he will unretire at some point. Sure. Maybe he will. He’s only 30 years old (31 on Aug. 21) and there’s still good money in being Bolt on the track. But I think there’s a good chance this retirement will take. The usual reason: Bolt has never loved training and he can finally put that behind him. (He also doesn’t love daylong photo shoots and many of the other duties required of millionaire celebrity athletes, although he’s all about many of the other perks). A more tangible reason: He’s older and slower—Bolt has run faster than 9.80 seconds in the 100 meters only twice since the 2012 Olympics, at the finals of the 2013 and ’15 worlds. His winning time in Rio was 9.81. His untouchable world record of 9.58 is eight years old.

He has spent a decade or more managing chronic back issues. The job of being Bolt, while still lucrative, is more difficult. Even if he were to stick around, there’s no guarantee that he will keep winning races. There’s no guarantee that he will win Saturday (although the rest of the world hasn’t torn up the 100 meters this year, either; Bolt’s best is only 9.95, but the only sub 9.90 performance this year was a 9.82 by 21-year-old Christian Coleman of the U.S. two months ago at the NCAA Championship meet in Eugene. The withdrawal of Canadian Andre DeGrasse this week further weakened the field). Superman Bolt is done. It’s hard to imagine him grinding out another year or two, or all the way to 2020, running in the 9.90s and leaning at the tape to win races. But he could. I’m just betting it won’t happen.

So let’s assume this is the end. We as a sports culture are accustomed to saying goodbye to athletes. The routine is well-practiced. Highlights, memories, a final flash of brilliance. Applause. Laughter. Tears. Curtain drops. We are insulated from genuine, deep sadness by the security that comes from knowing that greatness replaces itself. Bird and Magic left, Jordan came along. Jordan left, Lebron came along, and then Curry. Etcetera. Pick your sport. Track and field, which unfolds in ponderous afternoons and evenings, translated—but also burdened—by arcane statistics and worshipped by an increasingly vertical audience (like many Olympic sports in this regard), derives any crossover appeal from the superstars who periodically arrive at the starting line and nudge their way into mainstream. Bolt arrived, as a superstar, in 2008. And he didn’t nudge his way anywhere; he exploded.

It started with a single race, the 2008 Olympic 100-meter final in Beijing. On that night Bolt separated from the fastest men in the world—all of them athletic freaks, let’s be honest—with stunning ease. He unfurled his entire 6'4" frame and swallowed ground in giant chunks. (I’ve since seen this effect, close-up, in training; it’s intoxicating, like CGI in real life. Spikes ripping over the track, a body passing, generating a breeze. Bolt is not just fast, he’s a weather system). What Bolt did after that race was even more significant: He danced, posed and partied. And that party has gone on for a decade. His races are like concerts, building to a crescendo at the gun, followed by a long, satisfying encore, with selfies for all. He has been the rare athlete who seems both transcendent and accessible, and he has made it all look fun (it has been) and easy (it hasn’t been).

And never forget this: Bolt has been at his absolute best under the withering pressure of championship sprinting. He ran 21 global championship races from 2008-16, the 100 meters, 200 meters and 4X100-meter relay at three Olympics and four world championships, and won 19 of them. His two losses resulted from a false start at the 100 meters in the 2011 worlds and from the disqualification of a Jamaican teammate who tested positive for steroids after the 4X100-meter relay at the 2008 Olympics. His three fastest 100-meter times, and five fastest 200-meter times, and all three of his world records, came in championship competition.

So let’s be clear about this: There is no replacing Usain Bolt.

This is where the narrative turns less cheery. In these last 10, rollicking years, Bolt has become the most famous and successful track and field athlete in history, a wealthy international celebrity who is almost universally beloved. But in those 10 years, Bolt has not made track and field more popular, he has made Usain Bolt more popular, and fabulously so. The residual effect will be negligible. When Bolt leaves, he takes his popularity with him and closes the door on his way out. (Yes, track officials have expressed a desire for Bolt to remain present, and perhaps there’s something to be gained from having Bolt in the stadium for future meets, but nobody wants to watch Springsteen sitting in the front row tapping his feet; they want to watch him sing "Jungleland.").

On the occasion of Bolt’s retirement, it’s worth thinking about the state of track and field before Bolt went viral in Beijing. (Bolt had been a promising sprint prodigy in his teens, but he became something else altogether in ’08). In 2006, Justin Gatlin of the U.S., the fresh-scrubbed Olympic 100-meter gold medalist from 2004 and newly minted world record holder, was nailed for a positive PED test and slapped with an eight-year ban (eventually reduced to four years). Gatlin was in many ways the new face of track and field, expected to help guide the sport away from the Marion Jones debacle. (Track is always seeking to distance itself from the latest doping scandal… more on this to come).

In the summer of 2007, Tyson Gay of the U.S. won the 100, 200 and 4X100 relay at the worlds in Osaka, Japan. But Gay was a reticent star (and would later suffer his own steroid indignity). It was Bolt who made everyone forget about Gatlin and all the other doping scandals, and he has been performing some form of this duty for a decade. Bolt has been track’s safe space, where the sport’s fans go to forget about doping and diminishing widespread appeal. Systemic Russian doping scandal? No problem, we’ve got Bolt. Nike Oregon Project embroiled in controversy? No problem, we’ve got Bolt.

For every problem posed, Bolt has been the answer. And a good answer. A life-affirming answer. An answer that makes you smile and then laugh.

Yes, I’m aware that a vocal minority in track and field believes that Bolt has been doping all along. He became too fast, too quickly in the 100 meters and dropped his times too far in the 200 meters. Plus, Jamaica’s domestic anti-doping system has been less than rigorous. There’s plenty of circumstantial evidence to carry a conversation about whether Bolt is clean or not. I don’t know if Bolt has been clean throughout his career. I don’t know if any athlete has been clean throughout his or her career, excepting those with positive drug tests, which constitute only a small portion of those who are actually doping. There are other theorists who believe that even if Bolt had been caught, those records would have been quashed by the forces that stand to gain from his continued greatness: Shoe and apparel companies, television networks, international governing bodies. Absent hard evidence, I choose to stand at the opening of that rabbit hole and not venture down. It’s too deep and too dark.

More importantly, the vast majority of the public—track fans and others—have chosen not to question Bolt. He’s infectious. We want his performances to be real, so we convince ourselves that they are. He’s a very tall man with the stride frequency of a smaller man, a bizarre combination of skills that just might enable somebody to run 9.58 seconds for 100 meters. I’ve spent time with Bolt on numerous occasions. I like the guy. Does that mean he’s been clean all these years? Nope. It just means I want to give him the benefit of the doubt and I’m far more cynical than most people watching Bolt run.

The track and field world that Bolt will leave behind next weekend is consumed with the issue of doping, as much as at any time in its history. (On this subject, entering the London meet, I recommend this piece written by Cathal Dennehy in the Irish Independent. U.S. media are intermittently diligent in addressing the specter of doping in track and field; European media—and fans—are relentless).

For a long time, track meets around the world have been conducted in a shadow of doping innuendo that just sucks the joy out of the competition. Whenever a time is just a little too fast, eye rolls cause the bleachers to sway. It’s a thing. A very real thing, and not just among media. Among athletes, too. It’s so ingrained in the culture of the sport that everybody just speaks in a sort of doping shorthand.

The Russian scandal, along with the revelations of inadequate testing in Ethiopia, Jamaica and Kenya have created a sense of almost overwhelming cynicism. Jama Aden of Somalia, a former world class runner who now coaches Ethiopian world record holder Genzebe Dibaba, was arrested last summer and doping materials were found in the room of one of his assistants. (Yet Dibaba has never tested positive). Coach Alberto Salazar, a legendary name in U.S. distance running, and the Nike Oregon Project remain under investigation by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency.

During the London worlds, more than three dozen athletes will receive reallocated medals that are the result of retroactive doping disqualifications from previous world championships. Among them is Kara Goucher, who won the bronze medal at the 2007 worlds (a breakthrough performance that in many ways started the rebirth of U.S, distance and middle-distance running). Goucher has been elevated to the silver through the disqualification of second-place finisher Elvan Abeylegesse of Turkey. Francena McCorory of the U.S. will receive a bronze medal from the 2011 400 meters (she had finished fourth) and the U.S. women’s 4X400-meter relay from 2013 will be elevated from silver to gold.

These are good and righteous corrections. Dopers are stripped and deserving athletes are rewarded. But, sadly, and there is no way around this, these ceremonies also serve to focus on the reality that, in the moment, what track fans are watching is often not genuine. Reallocation is a paper correction. Nobody can give Goucher the joy of crossing that line second or McCorory the thrill of winning an individual medal at a world championship. Nobody can refill the stadium and give the fans an untainted competition.

It’s important to say that track and field is trying to cleanse itself. The enormity of that task can be dispiriting, but more to the point in the present, it leaves the sport in a constant state of painful transition. Only by talking about eradicating doping can doping be eradicated, but that talk keeps the spotlight on doping and deepens the sense that track is irretrievably dirty. (It’s not; many athletes compete clean). Reallocation is big these days. It’s important and just. But it can get out of hand, too. Last week the London Daily Mail published a story, pegged to the five-year anniversary of the London Olympics and the return of the sport for the 2017 worlds, asking if the track and field competition in 2012 was "the dirtiest ever." The Daily Mail research concluded that 87 London finalists—one out of every seven—had previously committed a doping offense and that another 138 had a "connection" to doping, through a coach or agent or mention in the release of documents by the hacking group Fancy Bears.

Subsequently, former U.S. hurdler Lolo Jones tweeted this:

And then this:

Jones finished fourth in the 100-meter hurdles in London, an impressive performance after an injury- and drama-filled season. (You might remember). The three women who finished in front of her that night were Sally Pearson of Australia (gold), Dawn Harper of the U.S. (silver) and Kellie Wells of the U.S. (bronze). The only connection to doping for any of these three women came in February of 2017, when Harper received a three-month suspension, after a masking agent was found in a urine specimen collected in December of 2016. It’s not good that Harper had a masking agent in her urine, but does it make sense that Jones is apparently asking for Harper’s medal from more than four years earlier? This is among the unintended consequences of aggressive reallocation. If you happen to chat up Salazar at a pub, somebody’s gonna come after your medals from back in the day.

Back to the original point: Usain Bolt gave the sport regular and euphoric reprieves from the drumbeat of doping investigation and reveals. When he ran, there was almost exclusively elation. His departure leaves only more room for the negative.

It would be reassuring to suggest that there is an athlete in line to replace Bolt. The logical choice is long sprinter Wayde van Niekerk of South Africa. Last summer in Rio, Van Niekerk’s world record 43.03 in the 400 meters, from the blind Siberia of Lane 8, was one of the most remarkable footraces ever run by anyone, anywhere. He is a stunningly gifted athlete who, barring injury, is likely to become the first human to run one lap in less than 43 seconds and could possibly challenge Bolt’s world record of 19.19 seconds in the 200 meters. But there are holes in this projection: The 200 and 400 are not the 100, just ask Michael Johnson, who never became quite as famous as Carl Lewis. Also, to be the next Bolt, you have to not only run as fast as Bolt has run, but you have to do with Bolt’s style. Van Niekerk is reticent and humble, the kind of athlete who would hand the football to referee after scoring and softly thank God and family afterward. Which is all fine.

And the truth is, nobody has Bolt’s style. Nobody looks like Bolt running down the track, nobody rolls like Bolt afterward. He has been one of a kind and he will remain one of a kind. His presence gave track and field a 10-year reprieve, and now that reprieve is over.

10 facts you didn't know about Usain Bolt, the world's fastest man

Usain Bolt is a legendary figure. Rumours abound of chicken nugget-fuelled world records, and covertly-signed contracts to play for Manchester United once he hangs up his track spikes. He is, without a doubt, one of the greatest athletes in the world right now, and will go down in history for his achievements: if you're going to know ten obscure facts about any sportsman or woman, make it Usain St. Leo Bolt. 1. It all began with a bet over a free lunch When Bolt was just twelve years old, local priest Reverend Nugent overheard the youngster bickering with his close friend, Ricardo Gedes, over who was the quickest runner. Nugent decided to up the stakes in a bid to persuade the would-be sprinters to commit to the contest: free lunch to the winner. The pair were sold, and Usain Bolt tore to victory. As the priest departed and Bolt tucked into his spoils, legend has it that Nugent told the young Jamaican: ‘If you can beat Ricardo, you can beat anyone’. A star was born. Usain Bolt's best quotes 01:19 2. He's quite the philanthropist In 2009, Bolt paid just over £10,000 to formally adopt an abandoned cheetah cub - named Lightning Bolt - in Nairobi, and has since paid £2,300 a year to cover its upkeep at the orphanage. His support of Kenya's wildlife conservation efforts are surpassed by his charitable work closer to home: the Usain Bolt Foundation works to benefit local youngsters, through sporting provisions, improving community structures, and funding talented Jamaicans to excel in their chosen disciplines. The man might be worth millions of dollars these days, but, right from the off, he ensured his sponsorship deal with Puma provided for his hometown; every year, the manufacturer sends sporting equipment to his alma mater, William Knibb Memorial High School, to help others follow in its most famous alumni’s footsteps. When you see Usain Bolt in an advert, it’s most likely filmed in Jamaica, by a Jamaican production crew, in an attempt to boost local enterprise and gain exposure for the country. Under whose insistence? Bolt’s, of course. But will Bolt look so kindly upon his charge in a year or two, when the cheetah is the quicker of the pair? Credit: roberto schmidt/afp/getty images 3. He’s actually got a lightning-quick start Contrary to popular belief, the sprinter - when he executes properly - has one of the best starts in the sport, belying his height. His 100 metre world record in Beijing included an opening 60 metres which is believed to be quicker than the current world record over that distance. Where he pulls ahead from his rivals is the final stages of a race, where his long stride comes into its own, but don't follow the crowd and talk about Bolt as a ‘weak starter’: it’s a common misconception. 4. He’s a wicked cricketer Transferring some of his phenomenal speed from the track to the pitch appears second nature to the Jamaican, who was an avid fan of the sport as a youngster. A particular highlight has to be his smashing of Chris Gayle, West Indies national team captain, for six - shortly before clean bowling him with a none-too-shabby bouncer. That performance, as captain of the Trelawny All Stars XI in 2009, was followed by an exhibition fixture in Bangalore at the Chinnaswamy Stadium, in which the Jamaican hit a six off fellow Puma ambassador, India international Yuvraj Singh. Cricket lovely Cricket..Was great fun in India.. 6's and 4's rained from the sky..NJ and I successfully chased 61 runs from 4 overs to win the match.. #BoltinIndia #TeamBolt #Cricket #India #Sixes #Fours #Puma A photo posted by Usain St.Leo Bolt (@usainbolt) on Sep 2, 2014 at 9:26am PDT 5. He's got his own app The ‘Bolt!’ game rocket up to the top of the Jamaican charts, and reached the dizzying heights of number two in the UK’s top free apps list for 2012. Bolt’s not used to finishing second in anything, but he’ll have been pretty pleased with that. In the game, users steer an animated version of the sprint star through a variety of challenges to unlock faster sprint speeds. Having just taken it for a spin, I can report that it escalates pretty quickly: the faster you (Bolt) run, the more pirate (yes, pirate) traps are set for you, and the more Gatorade icons you require to sustain top speed. Eventually, you obtain a rocket grenade launcher, with which you can put paid to those pesky pirates once and for all. Relevant? Not in the slightest. Good fun? You bet. 6. He owns a restaurant in Jamaica 'Usain Bolt’s Tracks and Records’, outstanding pun work aside, seems pretty popular - a music and sport bar, described on its website as ‘the first of its kind in the Caribbean region’, striving to ‘break the barriers of a casual eatery and sports bar & lounge’. As eateries go, it’s a bit of a chimera - 7,000 square feet including a Jamaican fusion menu, multiple bar and lounge areas, ‘hi-tech booth seating’, a retail shop carrying exclusive Brand Bolt products, 45 flat screens for sporting events - including a 20 foot wide screen, and a decor featuring ‘the fundamentals of brand Jamaica’. The establishment promises to satisfy through ‘sight, sound, taste and touch’. We’re dying to try it out.  Hey! Stop by and watch the race in the morning, get yuh excitement (and free coffee) before work! pic.twitter.com/iODnSdEYPH— UB's Tracks&Records (@UBTandR) August 27, 2015 7. He’s managed all that he’s achieved with scoliosis Bolt’s biomechanical advantages are numerous, but one area in which his body isn’t a raw speed machine is his spine, where he suffers from an abnormal curvature. When a younger athlete, the condition often hampered his progress, he describes, and contributed to the series of niggles which delayed the realisation of his enormous potential. But, once Coach Mills established a consistent performance team around Bolt, the Jamaican has strengthened his core and back significantly, and the condition appears not to trouble him any more. He’s not alone in this, though - British middle distance athlete Emelia Gorecka, Romanian Olympic gymnast Alexandra Marinescu, and swimmer Jennifer Thompson of the United States, one of the most decorated Olympians in history  - prove that a spinal curve need not hold you back. 8. He's a loyal patient of controversial doctor, 'Healing Hans' Hans-Wilhelm Muller-Wohlfahrt, Bayern Munich’s ex-doctor, is known for unconventional substances, including Hyalart - extracted from cockerel crests - and Actovegin, which can be found in calves’ blood. The pair have worked together since Bolt was 16 years old, and he visits the doctor, now in his seventies, three or four times a year. A host of well-known figures have visited Healing Hans in the past, including Bono, Luciano Pavarotti, Boris Becker, and Bolt’s one-time rival, Tyson Gay. Muller-Wohlfahrt is an acupuncture and homeopathy specialist, trusted wholeheartedly by his athletes, and boasts a pair of signed Puma spikes in his office from Usain Bolt. Five of the eight finalists at the 2009 World Championships in Berlin have been treated by the German at one time: despite the air of mystery shrouding the figure, he clearly knows his stuff. Starting the recovery process right away. pic.twitter.com/J0HuvxOfiJ— Usain St. Leo Bolt (@usainbolt) July 2, 2016 9. He’s actually covered 100m in less than nine seconds Bolt's relay split in the London, in the men’s 4x100 metre final, has been given as 8.70 seconds - as he pulled away from Ryan Bailey of the United States down the final straight en route to a 36.84 finishing time. A lot of focus is put upon Bolt’s individual performances, but he’s been a part of the six fastest sprint relays of all time, consistently dipping below nine seconds in his splits for these. Quite frankly, that’s ridiculous. 10. He’s gone about wins in some very unconventional ways Evoking Chumbawamba’s seminal 1997 hit, Usain Bolt has had a few setbacks along the way to a glittering career, but he’s come back unperturbed to rewrite history time and again. The Jamaican managed his second 100 metre world record in 2008 with his shoe untied - decelerating before the line and thumping his chest in his first Olympic final, a golden lace streaming behind him. His fuel that day?McDonald’s chicken nuggets. Three years later, he false started in Daegu in the 100 metres to lose his only major championship event since 2008 before breaking the world record in the 4x100 and winning the 200m with the fifth fastest clocking of all time. And then - perhaps most ignominiously of all - Bolt was taken out by an errant cameraman's segway in 2015 after winning his fourth consecutive 200 metre world championship gold - he’s no stranger to a hiccup en route to success. 

10 facts you didn't know about Usain Bolt, the world's fastest man

Usain Bolt is a legendary figure. Rumours abound of chicken nugget-fuelled world records, and covertly-signed contracts to play for Manchester United once he hangs up his track spikes. He is, without a doubt, one of the greatest athletes in the world right now, and will go down in history for his achievements: if you're going to know ten obscure facts about any sportsman or woman, make it Usain St. Leo Bolt. 1. It all began with a bet over a free lunch When Bolt was just twelve years old, local priest Reverend Nugent overheard the youngster bickering with his close friend, Ricardo Gedes, over who was the quickest runner. Nugent decided to up the stakes in a bid to persuade the would-be sprinters to commit to the contest: free lunch to the winner. The pair were sold, and Usain Bolt tore to victory. As the priest departed and Bolt tucked into his spoils, legend has it that Nugent told the young Jamaican: ‘If you can beat Ricardo, you can beat anyone’. A star was born. Usain Bolt's best quotes 01:19 2. He's quite the philanthropist In 2009, Bolt paid just over £10,000 to formally adopt an abandoned cheetah cub - named Lightning Bolt - in Nairobi, and has since paid £2,300 a year to cover its upkeep at the orphanage. His support of Kenya's wildlife conservation efforts are surpassed by his charitable work closer to home: the Usain Bolt Foundation works to benefit local youngsters, through sporting provisions, improving community structures, and funding talented Jamaicans to excel in their chosen disciplines. The man might be worth millions of dollars these days, but, right from the off, he ensured his sponsorship deal with Puma provided for his hometown; every year, the manufacturer sends sporting equipment to his alma mater, William Knibb Memorial High School, to help others follow in its most famous alumni’s footsteps. When you see Usain Bolt in an advert, it’s most likely filmed in Jamaica, by a Jamaican production crew, in an attempt to boost local enterprise and gain exposure for the country. Under whose insistence? Bolt’s, of course. But will Bolt look so kindly upon his charge in a year or two, when the cheetah is the quicker of the pair? Credit: roberto schmidt/afp/getty images 3. He’s actually got a lightning-quick start Contrary to popular belief, the sprinter - when he executes properly - has one of the best starts in the sport, belying his height. His 100 metre world record in Beijing included an opening 60 metres which is believed to be quicker than the current world record over that distance. Where he pulls ahead from his rivals is the final stages of a race, where his long stride comes into its own, but don't follow the crowd and talk about Bolt as a ‘weak starter’: it’s a common misconception. 4. He’s a wicked cricketer Transferring some of his phenomenal speed from the track to the pitch appears second nature to the Jamaican, who was an avid fan of the sport as a youngster. A particular highlight has to be his smashing of Chris Gayle, West Indies national team captain, for six - shortly before clean bowling him with a none-too-shabby bouncer. That performance, as captain of the Trelawny All Stars XI in 2009, was followed by an exhibition fixture in Bangalore at the Chinnaswamy Stadium, in which the Jamaican hit a six off fellow Puma ambassador, India international Yuvraj Singh. Cricket lovely Cricket..Was great fun in India.. 6's and 4's rained from the sky..NJ and I successfully chased 61 runs from 4 overs to win the match.. #BoltinIndia #TeamBolt #Cricket #India #Sixes #Fours #Puma A photo posted by Usain St.Leo Bolt (@usainbolt) on Sep 2, 2014 at 9:26am PDT 5. He's got his own app The ‘Bolt!’ game rocket up to the top of the Jamaican charts, and reached the dizzying heights of number two in the UK’s top free apps list for 2012. Bolt’s not used to finishing second in anything, but he’ll have been pretty pleased with that. In the game, users steer an animated version of the sprint star through a variety of challenges to unlock faster sprint speeds. Having just taken it for a spin, I can report that it escalates pretty quickly: the faster you (Bolt) run, the more pirate (yes, pirate) traps are set for you, and the more Gatorade icons you require to sustain top speed. Eventually, you obtain a rocket grenade launcher, with which you can put paid to those pesky pirates once and for all. Relevant? Not in the slightest. Good fun? You bet. 6. He owns a restaurant in Jamaica 'Usain Bolt’s Tracks and Records’, outstanding pun work aside, seems pretty popular - a music and sport bar, described on its website as ‘the first of its kind in the Caribbean region’, striving to ‘break the barriers of a casual eatery and sports bar & lounge’. As eateries go, it’s a bit of a chimera - 7,000 square feet including a Jamaican fusion menu, multiple bar and lounge areas, ‘hi-tech booth seating’, a retail shop carrying exclusive Brand Bolt products, 45 flat screens for sporting events - including a 20 foot wide screen, and a decor featuring ‘the fundamentals of brand Jamaica’. The establishment promises to satisfy through ‘sight, sound, taste and touch’. We’re dying to try it out.  Hey! Stop by and watch the race in the morning, get yuh excitement (and free coffee) before work! pic.twitter.com/iODnSdEYPH— UB's Tracks&Records (@UBTandR) August 27, 2015 7. He’s managed all that he’s achieved with scoliosis Bolt’s biomechanical advantages are numerous, but one area in which his body isn’t a raw speed machine is his spine, where he suffers from an abnormal curvature. When a younger athlete, the condition often hampered his progress, he describes, and contributed to the series of niggles which delayed the realisation of his enormous potential. But, once Coach Mills established a consistent performance team around Bolt, the Jamaican has strengthened his core and back significantly, and the condition appears not to trouble him any more. He’s not alone in this, though - British middle distance athlete Emelia Gorecka, Romanian Olympic gymnast Alexandra Marinescu, and swimmer Jennifer Thompson of the United States, one of the most decorated Olympians in history  - prove that a spinal curve need not hold you back. 8. He's a loyal patient of controversial doctor, 'Healing Hans' Hans-Wilhelm Muller-Wohlfahrt, Bayern Munich’s ex-doctor, is known for unconventional substances, including Hyalart - extracted from cockerel crests - and Actovegin, which can be found in calves’ blood. The pair have worked together since Bolt was 16 years old, and he visits the doctor, now in his seventies, three or four times a year. A host of well-known figures have visited Healing Hans in the past, including Bono, Luciano Pavarotti, Boris Becker, and Bolt’s one-time rival, Tyson Gay. Muller-Wohlfahrt is an acupuncture and homeopathy specialist, trusted wholeheartedly by his athletes, and boasts a pair of signed Puma spikes in his office from Usain Bolt. Five of the eight finalists at the 2009 World Championships in Berlin have been treated by the German at one time: despite the air of mystery shrouding the figure, he clearly knows his stuff. Starting the recovery process right away. pic.twitter.com/J0HuvxOfiJ— Usain St. Leo Bolt (@usainbolt) July 2, 2016 9. He’s actually covered 100m in less than nine seconds Bolt's relay split in the London, in the men’s 4x100 metre final, has been given as 8.70 seconds - as he pulled away from Ryan Bailey of the United States down the final straight en route to a 36.84 finishing time. A lot of focus is put upon Bolt’s individual performances, but he’s been a part of the six fastest sprint relays of all time, consistently dipping below nine seconds in his splits for these. Quite frankly, that’s ridiculous. 10. He’s gone about wins in some very unconventional ways Evoking Chumbawamba’s seminal 1997 hit, Usain Bolt has had a few setbacks along the way to a glittering career, but he’s come back unperturbed to rewrite history time and again. The Jamaican managed his second 100 metre world record in 2008 with his shoe untied - decelerating before the line and thumping his chest in his first Olympic final, a golden lace streaming behind him. His fuel that day?McDonald’s chicken nuggets. Three years later, he false started in Daegu in the 100 metres to lose his only major championship event since 2008 before breaking the world record in the 4x100 and winning the 200m with the fifth fastest clocking of all time. And then - perhaps most ignominiously of all - Bolt was taken out by an errant cameraman's segway in 2015 after winning his fourth consecutive 200 metre world championship gold - he’s no stranger to a hiccup en route to success. 

Alysia Montano competes again while pregnant at nationals

Tyson Gay, right, races against Christian Coleman in a heat of the first round of the men's 100 meters at the U.S. Track and Field Championships, Thursday, June 22, 2017, in Sacramento, Calif. Gay just missed qualifying for the next round, but Coleman finished first. Gay has been running with a heavy heart since his 15-year-old daughter was shot and killed in October 2016 outside a restaurant in Kentucky. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

Tyson Gay keeps sprinting in memory of 15-year-old daughter

Sprinter Tyson Gay adjusts the starting block before taking a practice run, Wednesday, June 21, 2017, in Sacramento, Calif. Gay will be competing in the 100 and 200 meter races at the USA Track and Field Championships that starts Thursday and runs through Sunday. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

Tyson Gay keeps sprinting in memory of 15-year-old daughter

FILE - In this May 3, 2014, file photo, Trinity Gay, a seventh-grader racing for her Scott County High School team, poses for a photo with her father, Tyson Gay, after she won the 100 meters and was part of the winning 4-by-100 and 4-by-200 relays at the meet in Georgetown, Ky. The heartache still weighs heavily on Tyson Gay. But he keeps sprinting in her memory. The 15-year-old daughter of the Olympic sprinter was shot and killed in October outside a restaurant in Lexington, Kentucky. "You never forget it. You try to think about the good times," Gay said as he prepares for the first round of the 100 meters Thursday night at U.S track and field championships. (Mark Maloney/Lexington Herald-Leader via AP, FIle)/Lexington Herald-Leader via AP)

FILE - In this May 3, 2014, file photo, Trinity Gay, a seventh-grader racing for her Scott County High School team, poses for a photo with her father, Tyson Gay, after she won the 100 meters and was part of the winning 4-by-100 and 4-by-200 relays at the meet in Georgetown, Ky. The heartache still weighs heavily on Tyson Gay. But he keeps sprinting in her memory. The 15-year-old daughter of the Olympic sprinter was shot and killed in October outside a restaurant in Lexington, Kentucky. "You never forget it. You try to think about the good times," Gay said as he prepares for the first round of the 100 meters Thursday night at U.S track and field championships. (Mark Maloney/Lexington Herald-Leader via AP, FIle)/Lexington Herald-Leader via AP)

FILE - In this May 3, 2014, file photo, Trinity Gay, a seventh-grader racing for her Scott County High School team, poses for a photo with her father, Tyson Gay, after she won the 100 meters and was part of the winning 4-by-100 and 4-by-200 relays at the meet in Georgetown, Ky. The heartache still weighs heavily on Tyson Gay. But he keeps sprinting in her memory. The 15-year-old daughter of the Olympic sprinter was shot and killed in October outside a restaurant in Lexington, Kentucky. "You never forget it. You try to think about the good times," Gay said as he prepares for the first round of the 100 meters Thursday night at U.S track and field championships. (Mark Maloney/Lexington Herald-Leader via AP, FIle)/Lexington Herald-Leader via AP)

Sprinter Tyson Gay adjusts the starting block before taking a practice run, Wednesday, June 21, 2017, in Sacramento, Calif. Gay will be competing in the 100 and 200 meter races at the USA Track and Field Championships that starts Thursday and runs through Sunday. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

Tyson Gay, right, races against Christian Coleman, second from right, Jeff Demps, second from left, and LeShon Collins, left, in a heat of the first round of the men's 100 meters at the U.S. Track and Field Championships, Thursday, June 22, 2017, in Sacramento, Calif. Gay just missed qualifying for the next round, but Coleman finished first. Gay has been running with a heavy heart since his 15-year-old daughter was shot and killed in October 2016 outside a restaurant in Kentucky. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

Tyson Gay, right, races against Christian Coleman in a heat of the first round of the men's 100 meters at the U.S. Track and Field Championships, Thursday, June 22, 2017, in Sacramento, Calif. Gay just missed qualifying for the next round, but Coleman finished first. Gay has been running with a heavy heart since his 15-year-old daughter was shot and killed in October 2016 outside a restaurant in Kentucky. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

USA Track & Field Outdoor Championships - Day 1

SACRAMENTO, CA - JUNE 22: Tyson Gay competes in the Men's 100m during Day 1 of the 2017 USA Track & Field Outdoor Championships at Hornet Stadium on June 22, 2017 in Sacramento, California. (Photo by Patrick Smith/Getty Images)

Tyson Gay finishes third in first round 100m heat

After his daughter's tragic death, Tyson Gay is on the road to recovery, running in her memory

It was around 3 a.m. when Tyson Gay’s sister walked into his room at his home in Winter Gardens, Fla., to wake him. She had just received a call from her daughter: Tyson’s 15-year-old daughter, Trinity, had been shot.

Gay checked his own phone and saw all the missed calls before he called his cousin Tim who confirmed the news and added that Trinity was in the hospital, near where the shooting took place in Lexington, Kentucky.

“My brain immediately told me to get a plane ticket on the next flight to go and see her in the hospital,” Gay says. “I was in that parent mode and thought when she was all better, I was going to tell her butt about being out late. I thought that as soon as I got to Kentucky then things would be OK. I had no idea where she was hit or anything.”

About 15 minutes later, he received a call from her mother, Shoshana Boyd, who was hysterically crying on the other line. Gay knew what it meant and broke down in tears.

In the early hours of Oct. 16, 2016, a shootout broke out among four men in the parking lot of a Cook Out restaurant in Lexington. Trinity and some friends were on their way to their car to avoid the incident when police say the 15-year-old was hit by a stray bullet. A blue Ford fled the scene but was later recovered by police.

Days after, police arrested four men in the shooting. Chazarae Taylor was charged with wanton endangerment and murder. His son D’Markeo Taylor, and Lamonte Williams and Dvonta Middlebrooks were charged with wanton endangerment in the death. All four men entered not guilty pleas.

“I just couldn’t get an understanding for why this could happen,” Gay says. “It was almost impossible to believe.”

Just months before the shooting, Gay’s focus was centered on the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, as he prepared to run as part of the United States’ 4x100 meter relay team. But as the team crossed the finish line in Rio, celebrating a bronze medal finish with American flags draped on their shoulders, they were quickly brought to a halt.

Due to a bad handoff outside of the changeover zone between the first and second leg, the team was disqualified.

“Retirement crossed my mind,” says Gay, 34, of the period of time after the Olympics. “Sometimes the body doesn’t give you the times that you want. I’m late in my career. Mentally, you can get flustered. I was up and down with my decision-making. This is a sport that I love and I found it hard to hang up the spikes like that.”

Then, weeks after returning home from a disappointing Olympics, Gay received that dreadful phone call. Trinity’s death made returning to the track that much for difficult for Gay.

“It was soon after the tragedy that I texted my agent and told him I wanted to run one more season for her,” says Gay. “We’ll see how the body feels after that.”

Gay was not one to push Trinity into running, or suggest that she follow in his footsteps, so he was surprised when she told him she wanted to pursue track seriously in high school. But Trinity never felt entitled to anything on the track because of her superstar father. She wanted to make her own name, so you wouldn’t see her arms up toward the heavens at the starting line or wearing multiple heavy gold chains like her father does, says Crystal Washington, the Lafayette High track and field coach who grew up in the area, raced Tyson Gay’s older sister, Tiffany, in high school and closely followed the American record holder’s professional career.

“Our father-and-daughter relationship was one where I didn’t say too much while she was competing and just loved seeing her go out there and have some fun,” Gay says. “She did tell me that she felt a little bit of pressure when I was in the stands. I remember her saying, ‘Daddy, when you’re not there it seems like I run my best and when you’re there I think I get nervous.’ We found a cool balance.”

Trinity ran personal bests of 12.15 for the 100 meters and 25.42 in the 200 meters. Washington believes that running in college was in Trinity’s future. Trinity had once mentioned to her father that she wanted to move to Florida for her senior year to train closer to him and explore her options of racing in college. After her death, members of the Lafayette track team found their own struggle to compete in the face of tragedy.

Within two days of the shooting, close friends of Tyson and Boyd helped organize a candlelight vigil at the Lafayette High School track. Thousands of people attended the ceremony where track spikes hung on the metal fence surrounding the track. Tyson, wearing the same thick beard and gold chains that he donned before the world in Rio, made his first public comments and called for an end to gun violence.

“I don't want to read in the paper next week about another senseless killing," Tyson said that night. "It has to stop.”

That night Tyson also said that he didn’t want to continue seeing more young people falling through the cracks and getting involved in violence. It’s a message that he repeated at her funeral on October 22, when hundreds packed Southland Christian Church to honor her memory.

“I really hope that our community can come together and lead our young kids down the right path,” Gay says. “I will try my best to be the voice of that but I need your help. I need the mayor’s help. I need the police officer’s help. I need everyone’s help to allow her legacy to keep moving.”

There was talk about her smile and positive attitude.

“I believe Trinity is passing the baton,” her grandmother, Daisy Lowe, said at the ceremony. “Who is going to take it and run with it?”

As he prepared to run the 2017 outdoor season in her memory, Gay says he underwent counseling while grieving the loss, much like he’s done in recent years to deal with disappointments on the track.

“Some days you’re at practice and other days you’re not. Some days you're going through the motions. Some days you’re having a good day,” Gay says. “It’s still like that now and I just have to keep pushing as it makes you stronger. I’ve got to keep these old legs moving.”

Earlier this month, the defense attorneys for the four suspects were granted until June 30 to file motions, according to local reports. Police say Taylor created the environment that led to the deadly shooting and his attorney requested that some of the statements made by him to police be thrown out as evidence. The defense attorneys also told local media they intend to file a motion challenging the sufficiency of the indictment, as well as a motion to get separate trials for the suspects.

A trial date has not been set but could come when the hearing for the evidence suppression is held on June 30—one week after Gay competes at the U.S. Track and Field Championships in Sacramento.

Gay has yet to determine whether he and Boyd will attend any of the trial proceedings, and he and Boyd are finalizing paperwork for a foundation in Trinity’s honor. Even though Gay hasn’t run a wind-legal time in 2017—his best was a 9.94 at a low-key race in Florida with a +2.2m/s gust—he’ll be on the starting line at Hornets Stadium at the end of June.

“When the physical body is there, you have to learn how to adapt to the spirit,” Gay says. “That’s where my mind has been right now.”

After his daughter's tragic death, Tyson Gay is on the road to recovery, running in her memory

It was around 3 a.m. when Tyson Gay’s sister walked into his room at his home in Winter Gardens, Fla., to wake him. She had just received a call from her daughter: Tyson’s 15-year-old daughter, Trinity, had been shot.

Gay checked his own phone and saw all the missed calls before he called his cousin Tim who confirmed the news and added that Trinity was in the hospital, near where the shooting took place in Lexington, Kentucky.

“My brain immediately told me to get a plane ticket on the next flight to go and see her in the hospital,” Gay says. “I was in that parent mode and thought when she was all better, I was going to tell her butt about being out late. I thought that as soon as I got to Kentucky then things would be OK. I had no idea where she was hit or anything.”

About 15 minutes later, he received a call from her mother, Shoshana Boyd, who was hysterically crying on the other line. Gay knew what it meant and broke down in tears.

In the early hours of Oct. 16, 2016, a shootout broke out among four men in the parking lot of a Cook Out restaurant in Lexington. Trinity and some friends were on their way to their car to avoid the incident when police say the 15-year-old was hit by a stray bullet. A blue Ford fled the scene but was later recovered by police.

Days after, police arrested four men in the shooting. Chazarae Taylor was charged with wanton endangerment and murder. His son D’Markeo Taylor, and Lamonte Williams and Dvonta Middlebrooks were charged with wanton endangerment in the death. All four men entered not guilty pleas.

“I just couldn’t get an understanding for why this could happen,” Gay says. “It was almost impossible to believe.”

Just months before the shooting, Gay’s focus was centered on the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, as he prepared to run as part of the United States’ 4x100 meter relay team. But as the team crossed the finish line in Rio, celebrating a bronze medal finish with American flags draped on their shoulders, they were quickly brought to a halt.

Due to a bad handoff outside of the changeover zone between the first and second leg, the team was disqualified.

“Retirement crossed my mind,” says Gay, 34, of the period of time after the Olympics. “Sometimes the body doesn’t give you the times that you want. I’m late in my career. Mentally, you can get flustered. I was up and down with my decision-making. This is a sport that I love and I found it hard to hang up the spikes like that.”

Then, weeks after returning home from a disappointing Olympics, Gay received that dreadful phone call. Trinity’s death made returning to the track that much for difficult for Gay.

“It was soon after the tragedy that I texted my agent and told him I wanted to run one more season for her,” says Gay. “We’ll see how the body feels after that.”

Gay was not one to push Trinity into running, or suggest that she follow in his footsteps, so he was surprised when she told him she wanted to pursue track seriously in high school. But Trinity never felt entitled to anything on the track because of her superstar father. She wanted to make her own name, so you wouldn’t see her arms up toward the heavens at the starting line or wearing multiple heavy gold chains like her father does, says Crystal Washington, the Lafayette High track and field coach who grew up in the area, raced Tyson Gay’s older sister, Tiffany, in high school and closely followed the American record holder’s professional career.

“Our father-and-daughter relationship was one where I didn’t say too much while she was competing and just loved seeing her go out there and have some fun,” Gay says. “She did tell me that she felt a little bit of pressure when I was in the stands. I remember her saying, ‘Daddy, when you’re not there it seems like I run my best and when you’re there I think I get nervous.’ We found a cool balance.”

Trinity ran personal bests of 12.15 for the 100 meters and 25.42 in the 200 meters. Washington believes that running in college was in Trinity’s future. Trinity had once mentioned to her father that she wanted to move to Florida for her senior year to train closer to him and explore her options of racing in college. After her death, members of the Lafayette track team found their own struggle to compete in the face of tragedy.

Within two days of the shooting, close friends of Tyson and Boyd helped organize a candlelight vigil at the Lafayette High School track. Thousands of people attended the ceremony where track spikes hung on the metal fence surrounding the track. Tyson, wearing the same thick beard and gold chains that he donned before the world in Rio, made his first public comments and called for an end to gun violence.

“I don't want to read in the paper next week about another senseless killing," Tyson said that night. "It has to stop.”

That night Tyson also said that he didn’t want to continue seeing more young people falling through the cracks and getting involved in violence. It’s a message that he repeated at her funeral on October 22, when hundreds packed Southland Christian Church to honor her memory.

“I really hope that our community can come together and lead our young kids down the right path,” Gay says. “I will try my best to be the voice of that but I need your help. I need the mayor’s help. I need the police officer’s help. I need everyone’s help to allow her legacy to keep moving.”

There was talk about her smile and positive attitude.

“I believe Trinity is passing the baton,” her grandmother, Daisy Lowe, said at the ceremony. “Who is going to take it and run with it?”

As he prepared to run the 2017 outdoor season in her memory, Gay says he underwent counseling while grieving the loss, much like he’s done in recent years to deal with disappointments on the track.

“Some days you’re at practice and other days you’re not. Some days you're going through the motions. Some days you’re having a good day,” Gay says. “It’s still like that now and I just have to keep pushing as it makes you stronger. I’ve got to keep these old legs moving.”

Earlier this month, the defense attorneys for the four suspects were granted until June 30 to file motions, according to local reports. Police say Taylor created the environment that led to the deadly shooting and his attorney requested that some of the statements made by him to police be thrown out as evidence. The defense attorneys also told local media they intend to file a motion challenging the sufficiency of the indictment, as well as a motion to get separate trials for the suspects.

A trial date has not been set but could come when the hearing for the evidence suppression is held on June 30—one week after Gay competes at the U.S. Track and Field Championships in Sacramento.

Gay has yet to determine whether he and Boyd will attend any of the trial proceedings, and he and Boyd are finalizing paperwork for a foundation in Trinity’s honor. Even though Gay hasn’t run a wind-legal time in 2017—his best was a 9.94 at a low-key race in Florida with a +2.2m/s gust—he’ll be on the starting line at Hornets Stadium at the end of June.

“When the physical body is there, you have to learn how to adapt to the spirit,” Gay says. “That’s where my mind has been right now.”

After his daughter's tragic death, Tyson Gay is on the road to recovery, running in her memory

It was around 3 a.m. when Tyson Gay’s sister walked into his room at his home in Winter Gardens, Fla., to wake him. She had just received a call from her daughter: Tyson’s 15-year-old daughter, Trinity, had been shot.

Gay checked his own phone and saw all the missed calls before he called his cousin Tim who confirmed the news and added that Trinity was in the hospital, near where the shooting took place in Lexington, Kentucky.

“My brain immediately told me to get a plane ticket on the next flight to go and see her in the hospital,” Gay says. “I was in that parent mode and thought when she was all better, I was going to tell her butt about being out late. I thought that as soon as I got to Kentucky then things would be OK. I had no idea where she was hit or anything.”

About 15 minutes later, he received a call from her mother, Shoshana Boyd, who was hysterically crying on the other line. Gay knew what it meant and broke down in tears.

In the early hours of Oct. 16, 2016, a shootout broke out among four men in the parking lot of a Cook Out restaurant in Lexington. Trinity and some friends were on their way to their car to avoid the incident when police say the 15-year-old was hit by a stray bullet. A blue Ford fled the scene but was later recovered by police.

Days after, police arrested four men in the shooting. Chazarae Taylor was charged with wanton endangerment and murder. His son D’Markeo Taylor, and Lamonte Williams and Dvonta Middlebrooks were charged with wanton endangerment in the death. All four men entered not guilty pleas.

“I just couldn’t get an understanding for why this could happen,” Gay says. “It was almost impossible to believe.”

Just months before the shooting, Gay’s focus was centered on the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, as he prepared to run as part of the United States’ 4x100 meter relay team. But as the team crossed the finish line in Rio, celebrating a bronze medal finish with American flags draped on their shoulders, they were quickly brought to a halt.

Due to a bad handoff outside of the changeover zone between the first and second leg, the team was disqualified.

“Retirement crossed my mind,” says Gay, 34, of the period of time after the Olympics. “Sometimes the body doesn’t give you the times that you want. I’m late in my career. Mentally, you can get flustered. I was up and down with my decision-making. This is a sport that I love and I found it hard to hang up the spikes like that.”

Then, weeks after returning home from a disappointing Olympics, Gay received that dreadful phone call. Trinity’s death made returning to the track that much for difficult for Gay.

“It was soon after the tragedy that I texted my agent and told him I wanted to run one more season for her,” says Gay. “We’ll see how the body feels after that.”

Gay was not one to push Trinity into running, or suggest that she follow in his footsteps, so he was surprised when she told him she wanted to pursue track seriously in high school. But Trinity never felt entitled to anything on the track because of her superstar father. She wanted to make her own name, so you wouldn’t see her arms up toward the heavens at the starting line or wearing multiple heavy gold chains like her father does, says Crystal Washington, the Lafayette High track and field coach who grew up in the area, raced Tyson Gay’s older sister, Tiffany, in high school and closely followed the American record holder’s professional career.

“Our father-and-daughter relationship was one where I didn’t say too much while she was competing and just loved seeing her go out there and have some fun,” Gay says. “She did tell me that she felt a little bit of pressure when I was in the stands. I remember her saying, ‘Daddy, when you’re not there it seems like I run my best and when you’re there I think I get nervous.’ We found a cool balance.”

Trinity ran personal bests of 12.15 for the 100 meters and 25.42 in the 200 meters. Washington believes that running in college was in Trinity’s future. Trinity had once mentioned to her father that she wanted to move to Florida for her senior year to train closer to him and explore her options of racing in college. After her death, members of the Lafayette track team found their own struggle to compete in the face of tragedy.

Within two days of the shooting, close friends of Tyson and Boyd helped organize a candlelight vigil at the Lafayette High School track. Thousands of people attended the ceremony where track spikes hung on the metal fence surrounding the track. Tyson, wearing the same thick beard and gold chains that he donned before the world in Rio, made his first public comments and called for an end to gun violence.

“I don't want to read in the paper next week about another senseless killing," Tyson said that night. "It has to stop.”

That night Tyson also said that he didn’t want to continue seeing more young people falling through the cracks and getting involved in violence. It’s a message that he repeated at her funeral on October 22, when hundreds packed Southland Christian Church to honor her memory.

“I really hope that our community can come together and lead our young kids down the right path,” Gay says. “I will try my best to be the voice of that but I need your help. I need the mayor’s help. I need the police officer’s help. I need everyone’s help to allow her legacy to keep moving.”

There was talk about her smile and positive attitude.

“I believe Trinity is passing the baton,” her grandmother, Daisy Lowe, said at the ceremony. “Who is going to take it and run with it?”

As he prepared to run the 2017 outdoor season in her memory, Gay says he underwent counseling while grieving the loss, much like he’s done in recent years to deal with disappointments on the track.

“Some days you’re at practice and other days you’re not. Some days you're going through the motions. Some days you’re having a good day,” Gay says. “It’s still like that now and I just have to keep pushing as it makes you stronger. I’ve got to keep these old legs moving.”

Earlier this month, the defense attorneys for the four suspects were granted until June 30 to file motions, according to local reports. Police say Taylor created the environment that led to the deadly shooting and his attorney requested that some of the statements made by him to police be thrown out as evidence. The defense attorneys also told local media they intend to file a motion challenging the sufficiency of the indictment, as well as a motion to get separate trials for the suspects.

A trial date has not been set but could come when the hearing for the evidence suppression is held on June 30—one week after Gay competes at the U.S. Track and Field Championships in Sacramento.

Gay has yet to determine whether he and Boyd will attend any of the trial proceedings, and he and Boyd are finalizing paperwork for a foundation in Trinity’s honor. Even though Gay hasn’t run a wind-legal time in 2017—his best was a 9.94 at a low-key race in Florida with a +2.2m/s gust—he’ll be on the starting line at Hornets Stadium at the end of June.

“When the physical body is there, you have to learn how to adapt to the spirit,” Gay says. “That’s where my mind has been right now.”

Watch: Christian Coleman destroys collegiate 100 meter record in 9.82 seconds

Tennessee junior Christian Coleman ran a collegiate record and the world's fastest time of 2017 in the 100 meters with his 9.82 second run in the semifinals of the 2017 NCAA Outdoor Track and Field Championships.

The time also makes him the fourth-fastest American sprinter at the 100 meter distance. only Tyson Gay's 9.69, Justin Gatlin's 9.74 and Maurice Greene's 9.79 are faster in history.

He is now the ninth fastest at 100 meters all-time. Here is a list of those faster than him:

1. Usain Bolt (JAM) - 9.58

2. Tyson Gay (USA) - 9.69

3. Yohan Blake (JAM) - 9.69

4. Asafa Powell (JAM) - 9.72

5. Justin Gatlin (USA) - 9.74

6. Nesta Carter (JAM) - 9.78

7. Maurice Greene (USA) - 9.79

8. Steve Mullings (JAM) - 9.80

9. Christian Coleman (USA) - 9.82

Coleman has also run 19.85 for the 200 meters.

Coleman was the NCAA champion indoors at 60 meters and 200 meters during the indoor season. He is looking to capture the outdoor 100 meter and 200 meter titles.

Coleman could also contend for a spot on the U.S. national team for the IAAF World Championships in London later this summer. He must finish in the top three of the U.S. Championships, which will be held in Sacramento later this month.

Coleman's name may be familiar after he went viral for clocking a 4.12 for the 40 yard dash in a video put out by Tennessee's track and field team.

Athletics - Men's 4 x 100m Relay Final

2016 Rio Olympics - Athletics - Final - Men's 4 x 100m Relay Final - Olympic Stadium - Rio de Janeiro, Brazil - 19/08/2016. Mike Rodgers (USA) Justin Gatlin (USA) and Tyson Gay (USA) of USA react as they realise they have been disqualified REUTERS/David Gray

Athletics - Men's 4 x 100m Relay Final

2016 Rio Olympics - Athletics - Final - Men's 4 x 100m Relay Final - Olympic Stadium - Rio de Janeiro, Brazil - 19/08/2016. Mike Rodgers (USA) of USA, Justin Gatlin (USA) of USA and Tyson Gay (USA) of USA after being disqualified. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

Athletics - Men's 4 x 100m Relay Final

2016 Rio Olympics - Athletics - Final - Men's 4 x 100m Relay Final - Olympic Stadium - Rio de Janeiro, Brazil - 19/08/2016. Mike Rodgers (USA) of USA, Justin Gatlin (USA) of USA and Tyson Gay (USA) of USA after being disqualified. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

Track and Field: 2016 U.S. Olympic Team Trials - Track & Field

Jul 3, 2016; Eugene, OR, USA; Ronnie Baker (far left) and Tyson Gay (left) and Trayvon Bromell (middle) compete during the men’s 100m semifinals heats in the 2016 U.S. Olympic track and field team trials at Hayward Field. Mandatory Credit: James Lang-USA TODAY Sports

Three Indicted in Fatal Shooting of Olympic Sprinter Tyson Gay’s Daughter

Grand Jury Indicts One Suspect For The Shooting Death Of Tyson Gay’s Daughter

In addition to the indictment, Chazerae Taylor also faces four counts of wanton endangerment.