National Geographic highlights Travel Photographer of the Year contest's People category

The competition continues in the 2018 National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year contest. This week, National Geographic editors selected some of the most incredible entries in the People category. These stunning portraits and action shots of people from around the world give a look at locals and travelers in Cuba, Bangladesh, India, Portugal and beyond.

The Travel Photographer of the Year contest was launched on April 10 and will accept entries until May 31. The grand-prize winner will receive a $10,000 cash prize, a feature on the National Geographic Travel Instagram and the prestigious title of 2018 National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year.

Eligible contestants can submit their entries here. National Geographic Travel will periodically highlight editors’ favorite photos from all three categories — Nature, People and Cities — in online galleries.

Here’s a look at some of the photos submitted in the People category thus far by photographers Jeremy Lasky, Sampa Guha Majumdar, Hidenobu SuzukiTihomir Trichkov, Mattia Passarini, Mahesh LonkarWilly SansonAidan WilliamsPeyton Sickles and Yousuf Tushar.

See more news-related photo galleries and follow us on Yahoo News Photo Twitter and Tumblr.

<p>Young boys play basketball after school in a Havana neighborhood, Cuba. (© Jeremy Lasky/National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest) </p>
One on one

Young boys play basketball after school in a Havana neighborhood, Cuba. (© Jeremy Lasky/National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest)

<p>Lath mar Holi is a local celebration of the Hindu festival of Holi. It takes place days before the actual Holi in the neighboring towns of Barsana and Nandgaon near Mathura in the state of Uttar Pradesh, where thousands of Hindus and tourists congregate, each year. (© Sampa Guha Majumdar/National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest) </p>
The colorful people

Lath mar Holi is a local celebration of the Hindu festival of Holi. It takes place days before the actual Holi in the neighboring towns of Barsana and Nandgaon near Mathura in the state of Uttar Pradesh, where thousands of Hindus and tourists congregate, each year. (© Sampa Guha Majumdar/National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest)

<p>It is the oldest traditional fireworks in Japan. The event is a ritual worshiping god. These hand tube fireworks use 3kg of gunpowder and all of the fireworks are handmade by the festival participants. Toyohashi City, Aichi Prefecture is the birthplace of hand-held fireworks. (© Hidenobu Suzuki/National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest) </p>
In the spark

It is the oldest traditional fireworks in Japan. The event is a ritual worshiping god. These hand tube fireworks use 3kg of gunpowder and all of the fireworks are handmade by the festival participants. Toyohashi City, Aichi Prefecture is the birthplace of hand-held fireworks. (© Hidenobu Suzuki/National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest)

Scroll to continue with content
Ad
<p>“My imagination ran wild, I was smelling the gunpowder, hearing the gun shots, neighing of the horses and the screams of the wounded, picturing what is it like to be under siege, protecting your freedom and ideals against foreign invasion. But the human mind is incredible, a sudden breeze of wind took me straight to a different time, a completely different movie set, a hundred or so years later, well famed for a single white dress…” (© Tihomir Trichkov/National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest) </p>
Tribute to Marilyn

“My imagination ran wild, I was smelling the gunpowder, hearing the gun shots, neighing of the horses and the screams of the wounded, picturing what is it like to be under siege, protecting your freedom and ideals against foreign invasion. But the human mind is incredible, a sudden breeze of wind took me straight to a different time, a completely different movie set, a hundred or so years later, well famed for a single white dress…” (© Tihomir Trichkov/National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest)

<p>Tibetan monks during the weekly pray in Tashi LhunPo Monastery in Tibet. The Tashi LhunPo Monastery, founded in 1447 by the 1st Dalai Lama, is historically important and the most influential monastery in Shigatse, the second-largest city in Tibet. Currently, 2000 monks reside there. (© Mattia Passarini/National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest) </p>
Tibetan monks

Tibetan monks during the weekly pray in Tashi LhunPo Monastery in Tibet. The Tashi LhunPo Monastery, founded in 1447 by the 1st Dalai Lama, is historically important and the most influential monastery in Shigatse, the second-largest city in Tibet. Currently, 2000 monks reside there. (© Mattia Passarini/National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest)

<p>“On my trip to the Pushkar Fair in Rajasthan I came across this unique combination of lights amidst the hustle bustle of the night. On one side was a barber waiting for more customers and on the other was the carpenter who was still working. People usually focus where the activity prevails. When I lifted my camera and focused it using my wide angle lens, it dawned on me that the picture holistically represents two people working in different lights. Then I merge their worlds into one image.” (© Mahesh Lonkari/National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest) </p>
Colors of work

“On my trip to the Pushkar Fair in Rajasthan I came across this unique combination of lights amidst the hustle bustle of the night. On one side was a barber waiting for more customers and on the other was the carpenter who was still working. People usually focus where the activity prevails. When I lifted my camera and focused it using my wide angle lens, it dawned on me that the picture holistically represents two people working in different lights. Then I merge their worlds into one image.” (© Mahesh Lonkari/National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest)

<p>Local festivals are the best time to understand the vibrant tribal culture. The Ghotpal Mandai in the Dantewada region of India is dedicated to the local deity. The local deities of all the neighboring villages gather for the Ghotpal mela. The main attractions are the colorful display of culture through the Bison-Horn Madiya dance. Movements to the rhythm of tribal instruments evoke the soul of wanderlust. (© Willy Sanson/Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest) </p>
Wanderlust

Local festivals are the best time to understand the vibrant tribal culture. The Ghotpal Mandai in the Dantewada region of India is dedicated to the local deity. The local deities of all the neighboring villages gather for the Ghotpal mela. The main attractions are the colorful display of culture through the Bison-Horn Madiya dance. Movements to the rhythm of tribal instruments evoke the soul of wanderlust. (© Willy Sanson/Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest)

<p>Andrey Karr from Western Riders Slacklines at sunset above big waves in Nazare, Portugal, Dec. 27, 2017. (© Aidan Williams/National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest) </p>
Freedom

Andrey Karr from Western Riders Slacklines at sunset above big waves in Nazare, Portugal, Dec. 27, 2017. (© Aidan Williams/National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest)

<p>“One day while adventuring in oahu, I looked up to find two kids flying! The moment I directed my camera at them, they became so excited that they began making faces and flashing peace signs. A moment that made the worries of the world dissipate, and all that remained was a pristine point in time.” (Photo: Peyton Sickles/National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest) </p>
Flying above all

“One day while adventuring in oahu, I looked up to find two kids flying! The moment I directed my camera at them, they became so excited that they began making faces and flashing peace signs. A moment that made the worries of the world dissipate, and all that remained was a pristine point in time.” (Photo: Peyton Sickles/National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest)

<p>A boy crossing a little pond beside a sea beach in a village in a Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh. In the village more than 5000 families are engaged with dry fish processing. Their children have no modern toys to play, so some times they play and make fun by themselves like jumping or running. (Photo: Yousuf Tushar/National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest) </p>
Crossing the pond

A boy crossing a little pond beside a sea beach in a village in a Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh. In the village more than 5000 families are engaged with dry fish processing. Their children have no modern toys to play, so some times they play and make fun by themselves like jumping or running. (Photo: Yousuf Tushar/National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest)

What to Read Next