Faces of Power to the Polls, the Las Vegas Women's March: 'Our voices are finally being heard'

Senior Editor
Yahoo Lifestyle

“They say what happens in Vegas stays in Vegas — but not today.” So said Alejandra Castillo, head of YWCA USA, from the stage of Power to the Polls, this year’s national Women’s March event, held on Sunday afternoon in Sin City. It was a fitting declaration for a day of taking stock and reinvigoration, meant to drop like a heavy stone into the waters of civic action and send ripples back out as far as they can travel.

Because unlike last year’s massive, anger-fueled march through the streets of Washington D.C., this was a rally, meant to be the official kickoff toward a decidedly more focused goal: to get one million women — the same number that marched through the capital in February 2017 — registered to vote, with a special eye on midterm elections. And volunteers got to work as soon as the doors to the Sam Boyd Stadium opened, roving with clipboards and getting people registered at designated tables.

Many speakers of the day — national activists like political commentator, writer, and professor Melissa Harris-Perry and Cecile Richards of Planned Parenthood, a smattering of politicians, Las Vegas shooting survivor turned gun-safety activist Christine Caria, and even superstar Cher — stayed powerfully on message, but there was no shortage of party vibes in the crowd of about 20,000. Women of all ages and races, and plenty of supportive men, were out in force in their dusted-off pink pussy hats, holding cleverly updated signs.

Most seemed to come from Nevada or California, though some traveled from as far as New York. All were laser-focused on the speakers and the vibes of empowerment, screaming and whooping and cheering in all the right places.

Above, a glimpse at some of the women who brought their best game to the stadium.

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<p>Winter Minisee, 17, of Los Angeles, who is part of the Women’s March Youth Initiative, was inspired to get involved when she heard a co-founder of the march speak last year. It earned her a scholarship to the 2017 Women’s Convention. “Now I do outreach and give out Empower tool kits to other youth,” she tells Yahoo Lifestyle. “Some of my peers are involved in the Women’s March, but I’m the only one on an actual outreach team.” (Photo: Ronda Churchill for Yahoo Lifestyle) </p>
Winter Minisee

Winter Minisee, 17, of Los Angeles, who is part of the Women’s March Youth Initiative, was inspired to get involved when she heard a co-founder of the march speak last year. It earned her a scholarship to the 2017 Women’s Convention. “Now I do outreach and give out Empower tool kits to other youth,” she tells Yahoo Lifestyle. “Some of my peers are involved in the Women’s March, but I’m the only one on an actual outreach team.” (Photo: Ronda Churchill for Yahoo Lifestyle)

<p>An estimated 20,000 women came out to Sam Boyd Stadium in Las Vegas for Power to the Polls on Sunday, Jan. 21. (Photo: Ronda Churchill for Yahoo Lifestyle) </p>
Power in the stands

An estimated 20,000 women came out to Sam Boyd Stadium in Las Vegas for Power to the Polls on Sunday, Jan. 21. (Photo: Ronda Churchill for Yahoo Lifestyle)

<p>Ella Bargo, 7, came with her family from Springfield, Mo. (Photo: Ronda Churchill for Yahoo Lifestyle) </p>
Ella Bargo

Ella Bargo, 7, came with her family from Springfield, Mo. (Photo: Ronda Churchill for Yahoo Lifestyle)

<p>Deanna Robinson is president of the Las Vegas nonprofit <a href="https://www.facebook.com/veryawesomegirls/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Very Awesome Girls Into Nerdy Activities" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Very Awesome Girls Into Nerdy Activities</a> (VAGINA), a quirky empowerment organization for women 18 and up. When she learned the main Women’s March event would be held in Las Vegas, she says, “I was excited to know we’d become a pivotal place in the country … and that our voices are finally being heard.” (Photo: Ronda Churchill for Yahoo Lifestyle) </p>
Deanna Robinson

Deanna Robinson is president of the Las Vegas nonprofit Very Awesome Girls Into Nerdy Activities (VAGINA), a quirky empowerment organization for women 18 and up. When she learned the main Women’s March event would be held in Las Vegas, she says, “I was excited to know we’d become a pivotal place in the country … and that our voices are finally being heard.” (Photo: Ronda Churchill for Yahoo Lifestyle)

<p>Marcie Wells gave good vibes from the stands at Power to the Polls in Las Vegas. (Photo: Ronda Churchill for Yahoo Lifestyle) </p>
Marcie Wells

Marcie Wells gave good vibes from the stands at Power to the Polls in Las Vegas. (Photo: Ronda Churchill for Yahoo Lifestyle)

<p>The crowd at Sam Boyd Stadium had the feel of a mellow, happy concert — with lots of pussy hats. (Photo: Ronda Churchill for Yahoo Lifestyle) </p>
A sea of women

The crowd at Sam Boyd Stadium had the feel of a mellow, happy concert — with lots of pussy hats. (Photo: Ronda Churchill for Yahoo Lifestyle)

<p>Rebel, of Las Vegas, came out in support of sex workers’ rights. “Sex-worker rights are basic rights and human rights,” she said, holding her son. She’s been active in local efforts to protect and unionize prostitutes and says she’s created apps that can assess the safety of potential clients. (Photo: Ronda Churchill for Yahoo Lifestyle) </p>
Rebel

Rebel, of Las Vegas, came out in support of sex workers’ rights. “Sex-worker rights are basic rights and human rights,” she said, holding her son. She’s been active in local efforts to protect and unionize prostitutes and says she’s created apps that can assess the safety of potential clients. (Photo: Ronda Churchill for Yahoo Lifestyle)

<p>The women filled about half of Sam Boyd Stadium for the Power to the Polls event on Sunday. (Photo: Ronda Churchill for Yahoo Lifestyle) </p>
Rallying cries

The women filled about half of Sam Boyd Stadium for the Power to the Polls event on Sunday. (Photo: Ronda Churchill for Yahoo Lifestyle)

<p>Delena Bobbera of Las Vegas has always been politically active — she was a Hillary Clinton delegate, worked on John Kerry’s presidential campaign, and was at Bill Clinton’s inauguration in 1997. Today, she says, “I am appalled with our president, and I’m here to voice my disgust with him as a leader and how our country has been overrun.” (Photo: Ronda Churchill for Yahoo Lifestyle) </p>
Delena Bobbera

Delena Bobbera of Las Vegas has always been politically active — she was a Hillary Clinton delegate, worked on John Kerry’s presidential campaign, and was at Bill Clinton’s inauguration in 1997. Today, she says, “I am appalled with our president, and I’m here to voice my disgust with him as a leader and how our country has been overrun.” (Photo: Ronda Churchill for Yahoo Lifestyle)

<p>Jenna Cumbers, 15, of the Las Vegas area, attended her first ever political rally on Sunday, with her friend Clara Applegate (next slide). “I was so excited I couldn’t sleep last night,” she tells Yahoo Lifestyle. “We live in a kind of conservative area. We have a white supremacist on our school bus.” (Photo: Ronda Churchill for Yahoo Lifestyle) </p>
Jenna Cumbers

Jenna Cumbers, 15, of the Las Vegas area, attended her first ever political rally on Sunday, with her friend Clara Applegate (next slide). “I was so excited I couldn’t sleep last night,” she tells Yahoo Lifestyle. “We live in a kind of conservative area. We have a white supremacist on our school bus.” (Photo: Ronda Churchill for Yahoo Lifestyle)

<p>From left: Jasmine Mejia, Jessica Walter, and Samantha Leslie came together from Las Vegas. “We’ve got to come together; it doesn’t matter if you’re injured,” says Walter, who has a dislocated knee. Leslie says, “I’m here to support all women, to support Planned Parenthood, and the fact that we’ve come so far and are now at a stalemate.” (Photo: Ronda Churchill for Yahoo Lifestyle) </p>
Las Vegas trio

From left: Jasmine Mejia, Jessica Walter, and Samantha Leslie came together from Las Vegas. “We’ve got to come together; it doesn’t matter if you’re injured,” says Walter, who has a dislocated knee. Leslie says, “I’m here to support all women, to support Planned Parenthood, and the fact that we’ve come so far and are now at a stalemate.” (Photo: Ronda Churchill for Yahoo Lifestyle)

<p>Li G attended Power to the Polls with his mother on Sunday. (Photo: Ronda Churchill for Yahoo Lifestyle) </p>
Li G

Li G attended Power to the Polls with his mother on Sunday. (Photo: Ronda Churchill for Yahoo Lifestyle)

<p>The tutu-wearing trio of, from left, Jennifer Thomas, Amy Lords, and Taryn Louis came from Las Vegas. “I don’t believe in that two-party system anymore,” says Thomas, who supported Bernie Sanders in the last election. “I think we’ve moved beyond it.” (Photo: Ronda Churchill for Yahoo Lifestyle) </p>
Tutu much

The tutu-wearing trio of, from left, Jennifer Thomas, Amy Lords, and Taryn Louis came from Las Vegas. “I don’t believe in that two-party system anymore,” says Thomas, who supported Bernie Sanders in the last election. “I think we’ve moved beyond it.” (Photo: Ronda Churchill for Yahoo Lifestyle)

<p>This Chuck Sperry designed poster was among the official Women’s March merch on Sunday. (Photo: Ronda Churchill for Yahoo Lifestyle) </p>
Women Rising

This Chuck Sperry designed poster was among the official Women’s March merch on Sunday. (Photo: Ronda Churchill for Yahoo Lifestyle)

<p>Members of the Cedar Band Paiute tribe, of Utah, took to the stage on Sunday to speak out about young women of their tribe who had gone missing or been found murdered and whose cases had gone cold, they believe, because they’re native people. As Echo Marie Jake, 10, explained to Yahoo Lifestyle after leaving the stage, “My cousins were murdered, so we’re here to represent them.” (Photo: Ronda Churchill for Yahoo Lifestyle) </p>
Echo Marie Jake

Members of the Cedar Band Paiute tribe, of Utah, took to the stage on Sunday to speak out about young women of their tribe who had gone missing or been found murdered and whose cases had gone cold, they believe, because they’re native people. As Echo Marie Jake, 10, explained to Yahoo Lifestyle after leaving the stage, “My cousins were murdered, so we’re here to represent them.” (Photo: Ronda Churchill for Yahoo Lifestyle)

<p>Mia Agudo, 10, stands for a photo at a Women’s March rally in Las Vegas. (Photo: Ronda Churchill for Yahoo Lifestyle) </p>
Mia Agudo

Mia Agudo, 10, stands for a photo at a Women’s March rally in Las Vegas. (Photo: Ronda Churchill for Yahoo Lifestyle)

<p>Clara Applegate, 15, attended from a nearby area with her friend Jenna. “It’s really motivational,” she says about the rally. “We’re learning about topics we haven’t even thought about or heard about yet, like Native American [issues].” (Photo: Ronda Churchill for Yahoo Lifestyle) </p>
Clara Applegate

Clara Applegate, 15, attended from a nearby area with her friend Jenna. “It’s really motivational,” she says about the rally. “We’re learning about topics we haven’t even thought about or heard about yet, like Native American [issues].” (Photo: Ronda Churchill for Yahoo Lifestyle)

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