Devils sign top 2017 draft pick Nico Hischier

NEWARK, N.J. (AP) The New Jersey Devils have signed No. 1 overall pick Nico Hischier to the maximum three-year, entry-level contract for salary and performance bonuses.

The Devils said Saturday that Hischier will have an average salary of $925,000.

The 18-year-old Swiss forward had 38 goals and 48 assists last season for the Halifax Mooseheads in the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League. He's participating in the Devils' development camp this weekend.

2017 | Nico Hischier, C, New Jersey Devils

With the franchise's first No. 1 pick since coming to New Jersey in 1982, the Devils made center Nico Hischier to highest drafted Swiss player in NHL history, beating out Nino Niederreiter (fifth, 2010). The speedy center posted 38 goals and 86 points with the QMJHL’s Halifax Mooseheads in 2016-17, adding 15 points in 11 games in a stellar World Juniors tournament. — Notable picks: No. 2: Nolan Patrick, C, Philadelphia Flyers | No. 3: Miro Heiskanen, D, Dallas Stars

2016 | Auston Matthew, C, Toronto Maple Leafs

The second generational talent in consecutive years, Auston Matthews took an odd path to the NHL by eschewing traditional routes of juniors and NCAA to play in a professional Swiss league.

2015 | Connor McDavid, C, Edmonton Oilers

No player has entered the league with such hype since Sidney Crosby a decade ago. Drafting first for the fourth time in the past six seasons, the Oilers added a generational talent in Connor McDavid. The dominant center scored 44 goals and 76 assists for 120 points in just 47 games with the Erie Otters in 2014-15, leading his team to the OHL finals while scoring 21 goals and 28 assists in just 19 playoff games. — Notable picks: No. 2: Jack Eichel, C, Buffalo Sabres | No. 3: Dylan Strome, C, Arizona Coyotes

2014 | Aaron Ekblad, D, Florida Panthers

The highly touted defenseman produced an impressive and nearly historic season that earned him the Calder Trophy. An offensive catalyst, he set team rookie records for goals (12), assists (27) and points (39), falling two points shy of Bobby Orr's NHL mark by an 18-year-old blueliner, set in 1966-67. Eklbad was also solid defensively, leading the Panthers with a +12 mark. — Notable picks: No. 2: Sam Reinhart, C, Buffalo Sabres | No. 3: Leon Draisaitl, C, Edmonton Oilers

2013 | Nathan MacKinnon, C, Colorado Avalanche

Center Nathan MacKinnon got off to a good start to prove he was worth the top pick. The 2013-14 Calder Trophy winner for rookie of the year scored 24 goals and 63 points, playing in all 82 games for the Avalanche. MacKinnon did suffer from a sophomore slump though, scoring just 38 points in 68 games last season. — Notable picks: No. 2: Aleksander Barkov, C, Florida Panthers | No. 6: Sean Monohan, C, Calgary Flames

2012 | Nail Yakupov, RW, Edmonton Oilers

For the third straight year the Oilers owned the draft's top pick, and for the third straight year they selected a prospect to boost their frontline. The first Russian-born player to go first since Alex Ovechkin in 2004, Yakupov put up 17 goals and 31 points in 48 games as an Oilers rookie during the 2013 lockout-shortened season. In his first full season (2013-14), Yakupov scored just 11 goals and 24 points in 63 games with a -33. The following season, Yakupov scored just 14 goals and 33 points in 81 games with a -35. Notable picks: — No. 2: Ryan Murray, D, Columbus Blue Jackets | No. 11: Filip Forsberg, C, Washington Capitals | No. 87: Frederik Andersen, G, Anaheim Ducks (re-entry)

2011 | Ryan Nugent-Hopkins, C, Edmonton Oilers

There wasn't much doubt over who the Oilers would take with their second straight No. 1 overall pick. Edmonton took Ryan Nugent-Hopkins, 18, an efficient passing center who had led the WHL with 75 assists. He was teamed with LW Taylor Hall, the No. 1 pick in 2010, to make what the Oilers expected would become a formidable young attacking duo. Since a promising rookie season, Nugent-Hopkins has not progressed though. — Notable picks: No. 2: Gabriel Landeskog, LW, Colorado Avalanche | No. 3: Jonathan Huberdeau, C, Florida Panthers | No. 43: Brandon Saad, LW, Chicago Blackhawks | No. 208: Ondrej Palat, LW, Tampa Bay Lightning

2010 | Taylor Hall, LW, Edmonton Oilers

The Oilers chose Taylor over Tyler (Seguin) in a draft that had two players worthy of being selected first overall. Hall won back-to-back Memorial Cups with the Windsor Spitfires (OHL), taking home MVP honors both times, and scored 22 goals in 65 games with Edmonton his rookie season. He was the fourth straight Ontario Hockey League player chosen with the No. 1 pick. — Notable picks: No. 2: Tyler Seguin, C, Boston Bruins | No. 4: Ryan Johanson, C, Columbus Blue Jackets | No. 7: Jeff Skinner, C, Carolina Hurricanes | No. 16: Vladimir Tarasenko, RW, St. Louis Blues | No. 187: Frederik Andersen, G, Carolina Hurricanes

2009 | John Tavares, C, New York Islanders

The New York Islanders kept everyone guessing, including Tavares himself, right up until they made him the No. 1 pick. Tavares led the Ontario Hockey League with 58 goals during his final season before the draft and broke Peter Lee's 33-year-old league record of 213 career goals. Tavares scored 24 goals (11 on the power play) and 54 points as an NHL rookie. In 2013, he'd led the Isles to their first postseason appearance since 2007 and earned a nomination for the Hart Trophy as NHL MVP. Tavares finished one point shy of leading the league in 2014-15 with 86. — Notable picks: No. 2: Victor Hedman, D, Tampa Bay Lightning | No. 3: Matt Duchene, C, Colorado Avalanche | No. 6: Oliver Ekman-Larsson, D, Arizona Coyotes

2008 | Steven Stamkos, C, Tampa Bay Lightning

After a rocky start with a team in turmoil, the much-hyped Stamkos finished the 2008-09 season strong (23 goals) and restored confidence that he could become the high-scoring two-way center many expected. In his sophomore season, Stamkos tied 2005 No. 1 overall pick Sidney Crosby for the league lead in goals with 51 (24 on the power play) and finished the year with 94 points, earning status as an elite forward in the NHL. In 2011-12, Stamkos led the league with 60 goals, including 12 game-winners. — Notable picks: No. 2: Drew Doughty, D, Los Angeles Kings | No. 4: Alex Pietrangelo, D, St. Louis Blues | No. 15: Erik Karlsson, D, Ottawa Senators | No. 22, Jordan Eberle, D, Edmonton Oilers | No. 51 Derek Stepan, C, New York Rangers | No. 93: Braden Holtby, G, Washington Capitals

2007 | Patrick Kane, RW, Chicago Blackhawks

One of the Blackhawks' talented young pillars, along with center Jonathan Toews, Kane won the Calder Trophy as Rookie of the Year in 2007-08. Kane finished the 2009-10 NHL season with a career-high 30 goals and 58 assists, and his 10 goals and 28 points in 22 playoff games were an integral part of the Blackhawks winning their first Stanley Cup in 49 years. In 2013, he won the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP as the Hawks won the Cup again. Kane won his third Cup in 2014-15. — Notable picks: No 2: James van Riemsdyk, LW, Philadelphia Flyers | No. 7: Jakub Voracek, RW, Columbus Blue Jackets| No. 9: Logan Couture, C, San Jose Sharks | No. 22: Max Pacioretty, LW, Montreal Canadiens | No. 43 P.K. Subban, D, Montreal Canadiens | No. 129: Jamie Benn, LW, Dallas Stars

2006 | Erik Johnson, D, St. Louis Blues

Highly-touted as a cornerstone of the Blues' youth movement, the swift-skating, physical, edgy blueliner had been plagued by injuries and missed all of the 2008-09 season after knee surgery. Johnson managed to play in 79 games during the 2009-10 season, scoring 10 goals (six on the power play) and 29 assists. In 2011, the Blues traded Johnson to Colorado. — Notable picks: No. 2: Jordan Staal, C, Pittsburgh Penguins | No. 3: Jonathan Toews, C, Chicago Blackhawks | No. 4: Nicklas Backstrom, C, Washington Capitals | No. 5: Phil Kessel, C, Boston Bruins | No. 22: Claude Giroux, RW, Philadelphia Flyers | No. 23: Semyon Varlamov, G, Colorado Avalanche

2005 | Sidney Crosby, C, Pittsburgh Penguins

The 21-year-old captain of the 2008-09 Stanley Cup champions steadily fulfilled his immense promise in only his first four seasons, winning a scoring title and a Hart Trophy (MVP) in the process. Crosby finished the 2009-10 season with a career-high 51 goals, tying Steven Stamkos for the league lead. During the three following seasons, his career was slowed by concussion problems, but when healthy, he remains the NHL's premiere player. Crosby won his second Hart Trophy following the 2013-14 season. — Notable picks: No. 2: Bobby Ryan, RW, Anaheim Ducks | No. 5: Carey Price, G, Montreal Canadiens | No. 11: Anze Kopitar, C, Los Angeles Kings | No. 21: Tuukka Rask, G, Boston Bruins | No. 62: Kris Letang, D, Pittsburgh Penguins | No. 72: Jonathan Quick, G, Los Angeles Kings

2004 | Alex Ovechkin, LW, Washington Capitals

One of the NHL's best and most electrifying players, Ovechkin beat out Sidney Crosby for the 2005-06 Calder Trophy as rookie of the year and went on to win the Hart Trophy as league MVP in 2009 and 2013. He's led the league in goals four times. — Notable picks: No. 2: Evgeni Malkin, C, Pittsburgh Penguins | No. 29: Mike Green, D, Washington Capitals | No. 258: Pekka Rinne, G, Nashville Predators | No. 262: Mark Streit, D, Montreal Canadiens

2003 | Marc-Andre Fleury, G, Pittsburgh Penguins

Though unnervingly erratic at times, Fleury proved his mettle during the Penguins' run to the 2009 Stanley Cup, especially during the thrilling seven-game final vs. Detroit. — Notable picks: No. 2: Eric Staal, C, Carolina Hurricanes | No. 5: Tomas Vanek, LW, Buffalo Sabres | No. 9: Dion Phaneuf, D, Calgary Flames | No. 11: Jeff Carter, C, Philadelphia Flyers | No. 17: Zach Parise, C, New Jersey Devils | No. 19: Ryan Getzlaf, C, Anaheim Ducks| No. 28: Corey Perry, RW, Anaheim Ducks | No. 49: Shea Weber, D, Nashville Predators | No. 205: Joe Pavelski, C, San Jose Sharks | No. 245: Dustin Byfuglien, D, Chicago Blackhawks

2002 | Rick Nash, LW, Columbus Blue Jackets

Hampered by a weak supporting cast in Columbus, Nash was slow to deliver on the promise of his league-leading 41-goal season of 2003-04, but his 40-goal, 79-point campaign of 2008-09 was instrumental in the Blue Jackets reaching the playoffs for the first time in their history. He was later traded to the New York Rangers in July 2012 as part of a rebuilding effort by Columbus, and scored 42 goals in 2014-15. — Notable picks: No. 2: Kari Lehtonen. G, Atlanta Thrashers | No. 13: Alexander Semin, LW, Washington Capitals | No. 25: Cam Ward, G, Carolina Hurricanes | No. 54: Duncan Keith, D, Chicago Blackhawks

2001 | Ilya Kovalchuk, LW, Atlanta Thrashers

The speedy Kovalchuk was a three-time All-Star and one of the league's elite goal-scorers, with two 50-goal seasons on his resume, one of which earned him the Rocket Richard Trophy for the 2003-04 season. — Notable picks: No. 2: Jason Spezza, C, Ottawa Senators | No. 95: Patrick Sharp, C, Philadelphia Flyers

2000 | Rick DiPietro, G, New York Islanders

The first goaltender ever drafted No. 1 overall, DiPietro showed flashes of brilliance while battling chronic hip and knee injuries that called his 15-year contract with the Islanders into question. Following the 2012-13 season, the Isles bought out the remaining eight years on his contract and DP has since retired. — Notable picks: No. 2: Dany Heatley, RW, Atlanta Thrashers | No. 3: Marian Gaborik, RW, Minnesota Wild | No. 118: Lubomir Visnovsky, D, Los Angeles Kings | No. 205: Henrik Lundqvist, G, New York Rangers

1999 | Patrik Stefan, C, Atlanta Thrashers

The big Czech forward failed to live up to his promise, playing a soft game and never scoring more than 14 goals or 40 points in a season for the Thrashers and Dallas Stars. He was last seen in the Swiss-A league back in 2007-08. — Notable picks: No. 2: Daniel Sedin, LW, Vancouver Canucks | No. 3: Henrik Sedin, C, Vancouver Canucks | No. 138: Ryan Miller, G, Buffalo Sabres | No. 210: Henrik Zetterberg, C/LW, Detroit Red Wings

1998 | Vincent Lecavalier, C, Tampa Bay Lightning

Tampa Bay's classy captain led the team to the Stanley Cup in 2003-04 and holds the franchise career records for goals (383) and ranks second in points (874). Lecavalier won the Rocket Richard Trophy by scoring 52 goals during the 2006-07 season. — Notable picks: No. 2: David Legwand, C, Nashville Predators | No. 12: Alex Tanguay, LW, Colorado Avalanche | No. 22: Simon Gagne, LW, Philadelphia Flyers | No. 27: Scott Gomez, C, New Jersey Devils | No. 45: Mike Ribeiro, C, Montreal Canadiens | No. 64: Brad Richards, C, Tampa Bay Lightning | No. 162: Andrei Markov, D, Montreal Canadiens | No. 171: Pavel Datsyuk, C, Detroit Red Wings

1997 | Joe Thornton, C, Boston Bruins

Now a pillar of the San Jose Sharks, Jumbo Joe is a six-time All-Star with immense talent (NHL's leading scorer and MVP in 2005-06), but a disconcerting reputation for coming up small in the postseason. — Notable picks: No. 2: Patrick Marleau, C, San Jose Sharks | No. 3: Olli Jokinen, C, Los Angeles Kings | No. 4: Roberto Luongo, G, New York Islanders | No. 12: Marian Hossa, RW, Ottawa Senators | No. 156: Brian Campbell, D, Buffalo Sabres

1996 | Chris Phillips, D, Ottawa Senators

Phillips has been a reliable if unspectacular defensive blueliner for 17 seasons in Ottawa. — Notable picks: No. 2: Andrei Zyuzin, D, San Jose Sharks | No. 24: Danny Briere, C, Arizona Coyotes | No. 56: Zdeno Chara, D, New York Islanders | No. 179: Pavel Kubina, D, Tampa Bay Lightning | No. 204: Tomas Kaberle, D, Toronto Maple Leafs

1995 | Bryan Berard, D, Ottawa Senators

Traded to the Islanders for the rights to Wade Redden, the swift, offensive-minded Berard beat out Jarome Iginla for the Calder Trophy, but had his career derailed by a serious eye injury in 2000. Returning with limited vision in 2001, Berard played for five teams before heading to Russia's KHL. — Notable picks: No. 2: Wade Redden, D, New York Islanders | No. 7: Shane Doan, C, Winnipeg Jets | No. 11: Jarome Iginla, RW, Dallas Stars | No. 13: Jean-Sebastien Giguere, G, Hartford Whalers | No. 91: Marc Savard, C, New York Rangers | No. 116: Miikka Kiprusoff, G, San Jose Sharks

1994 | Ed Jovanovski, D, Florida Panthers

The five-time All-Star had a solid 18-year career as a rugged blueliner with offensive firepower for Florida, Vancouver and Phoenix. — Notable picks: No. 2: Oleg Tverdovsky, D, Anaheim Ducks | No. 44: Jose Theodore, G, Montreal Canadiens | No. 51: Patrik Elias, LW, New Jersey Devils | No. 71: Sheldon Souray, D, New Jersey Devils | No. 72: Chris Drury, C, Quebec Nordiques | No. 87: Milan Hejduk, RW, Quebec Nordiques | No. 133: Daniel Alfredsson, RW, Ottawa Senators | No. 217: Tim Thomas, G, Quebec Nordiques | No. 219: Evgeni Nabokov, G, San Jose Sharks | No. 226: Tomas Vokoun, G, Monteal Canadiens

1993 | Alexandre Daigle, C, Ottawa Senators

Daigle's speed and scoring potential most often produced frustration (he never topped 26 goals or 51 points in a season) on the part of the seven teams that employed him during his 10-year NHL career. — Notable picks: No. 2: Chris Pronger, D, Hartford Whalers | No. 4: Paul Kariya, LW, Anaheim Ducks | No. 23: Todd Bertuzzi, RW, New York Islanders | No. 227: Pavol Demitra, C, Ottawa Senators | No. 250: Kimmo Timonen, D, Los Angeles Kings

1992 | Roman Hamrlik, D, Tampa Bay Lightning

Blessed with great skating ability and a blistering point shot, Hamrlik was a valuable defenseman for seven NHL teams, though never an elite cornerstone, as one might expect from a No 1 overall pick. A three-time All-Star, Hamrlik scored 638 points in 1,395 games. — Notable picks: No. 2: Alexei Yashin, C, Ottawa Senators | No. 14: Sergei Gonchar, D, Washington Capitals | No. 40: Michael Peca, C, Vancouver Canucks | No. 204: Nikolai Khabibulin, G, Winnipeg Jets

1991 | Eric Lindros, C, Philadelphia Flyers

Dubbed The Next One, Lindros famously forced a trade to Philadelphia where he became captain, the pivot on the legendary Legion of Doom line, and the 1994-95 Hart Trophy-winner. His 13-season career was diminished and ultimately ended by a series of concussions. — Notable picks: No. 2: Pat Falloon, RW, San Jose Sharks | No. 3: Scott Niedermayer, D, New Jersey Devils | No. 6: Peter Forsberg, C, Philadelphia Flyers | No. 15: Alexei Kovalev, RW, New York Rangers | No. 16: Markus Naslund, LW, Pittsburgh Penguins | No. 23: Ray Whitney, LW, San Jose Sharks | No. 26: Ziggy Palffy, RW, New York Islanders | No. 30: Sandis Ozolinsh, D, San Jose Sharks | No. 54: Chris Osgood, G, Detroit Red Wings

1990 | Owen Nolan, RW, Quebec Nordiques

Nolan was a respected leader for seven NHL teams while occasionally producing a 30- or 40-goal campaign. In 2008-09, his 17th NHL season, the rugged power forward scored 25 goals and 45 points for the Minnesota Wild at the ripe old age of 37. — Notable picks: No. 2: Petr Nedved, C, Vancouver Canucks | No. 5: Jaromir Jagr, RW, Pittsburgh Penguins | No. 8: Derian Hatcher, D, Minnesota North Stars | No. 19: Keith Tkachuk, LW, Winnipeg Jets | No. 20: Martin Brodeur, G, New Jersey Devils | No. 34: Doug Weight, C, New York Rangers | No. 85: Sergei Zubov, D, New York Rangers | No. 156: Peter Bondra, RW, Washington Capitals

1989 | Mats Sundin, C, Quebec Nordiques

The first European player ever chosen first overall, the slick Swede was traded to Toronto in 1994 and became the Maple Leafs' captain as well as their all-time leading scorer. The 10-time All-Star was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 2012. — Notable picks: No. 2: Dave Chyzowski, LW, New York Islanders | No. 5: Bill Guerin, RW, New Jersey Devils | No. 19: Olaf Kolzig, G, Washington Capitals | No. 22: Adam Foote, D, Quebec Nordiques | No. 53: Nicklas Lidstrom, D, Detroit Red Wings | No. 113: Pavel Bure, RW, Vancouver Canucks | No. 221: Vladimir Konstantinov, D, Detroit Red Wings

1988 | Mike Modano, C, Minnesota North Stars

The Hall of Fame awaits the all-time leading scorer among American-born players. A formidable package of speed, skill and size, the seven-time All-Star led the Dallas Stars to the Stanley Cup in 1999. — Notable picks: No. 2: Trevor Linden, RW, Vancouver Canucks | No. 8: Jeremy Roenick, C, Chicago Blackhawks | No. 9: Rod Brind'Amour, C, St. Louis Blues | No. 10: Teemu Selanne, RW, Winnipeg Jets | No. 67: Mark Recchi, RW, Pittsburgh Penguins | No. 68: Tony Amonte, RW, New York Rangers | No. 70: Rob Blake, D, Los Angeles Kings | No. 89: Alexander Mogilny, RW, Buffalo Sabres

1987 | Pierre Turgeon, C, Buffalo Sabres

The classy, gifted pivot spent 19 seasons with six teams, playing in four All-Star Games, winning the 1993 Lady Byng Trophy for gentlemanly play, and occasionally having big offensive seasons, such as his 132-point campaign in 1992-93 for the Islanders, to whom he was traded for future Hall of Famer Pat LaFontaine. — Notable picks: No. 2: Brendan Shanahan, LW, New Jersey Devils | No. 15: Joe Sakic, C, Quebec Nordiques | No. 33: John LeClair, RW, Montreal Canadiens | No. 38: Eric Desjardins, D, Montreal Canadiens | No. 44: Mathieu Schneider, D, Montreal Canadiens | No. 166: Theo Fleury, RW, Calgary Flames

1986 | Joe Murphy, RW, Detroit Red Wings

A disappointment in Detroit, Murphy skated on a Stanley Cup-winner in Edmonton in 1989-90, and had his peak season with the Oilers (35 goals in 1991-92). In all, though, his was a journeyman's career: 528 total points for seven teams over 14 seasons. — Notable picks: No. 2: Jimmy Carson, C, Los Angeles Kings | No. 9: Brian Leetch, D, New York Rangers | No. 22: Adam Graves, LW, Detroit Red Wings

1985 | Wendel Clark, LW, Toronto Maple Leafs

One of the most revered Leafs, the aggressive, roughneck Clark scored 34 goals (with 227 PIM) as a rookie and was edged for the Calder by Flames defenseman Gary Suter. Clark later attained the Leafs' captaincy, but was plagued by injuries and traded to Quebec for Mats Sundin in 1994. Clark retired in 2000, having scored 330 goals for six teams. — Notable picks: No. 2: Craig Simpson, LW, Pittsburgh Penguins | No. 27: Joe Nieuwendyk, C, Calgary Flames | No. 28: Mike Richter, G, New York Rangers | No. 52: Bill Ranford, G, Boston Bruins | No. 214: Igor Larionov, C, Vancouver Canucks

1984 | Mario Lemieux, C, Pittsburgh Penguins

Super Mario lived up to his nickname by winning the Calder, six scoring titles, seven MVP awards, and two Conn Smythes while leading the Penguins to two Stanley Cups. His career would have been even more spectacular had he not been slowed by cancer and a back injury, but he was still more than good enough for the Hall of Fame. — Notable picks: No. 2: Kirk Muller, LW, New Jersey Devils | No. 4: Al Iafrate, D, Toronto Maple Leafs | No. 51: Patrick Roy, G, Montreal Canadiens | No. 117: Brett Hull, RW, Calgary Flames | No. 171: Luc Robitaille, LW, Los Angeles Kings | No. 180: Gary Suter, D, Calgary Flames

1983 | Brian Lawton, LW, Minnesota North Stars

Lawton never amounted to much in the NHL, scoring just 266 points in 483 games. His best season came in 1986-87, when he scored 21 goals and 23 assists in 66 games. — Notable picks: No. 2: Sylvain Turgeon, LW, Hartford Whalers | No. 3: Pat LaFontaine, C, New York Islanders | No. 4: Steve Yzerman, C, Detroit Red Wings | No. 5: Tom Barrasso, G, Buffalo Sabres | No. 9: Cam Neely, RW, Boston Bruins | No. 108: Kevin Stevens, LW, Los Angeles Kings | No. 121: Rick Tocchet, RW, Philadelphia Flyers | No. 199: Dominik Hasek, G, Chicago Blackhawks

1982 | Gord Kluzak, D, Boston Bruins

Kluzak arrived from juniors with a knee injury that foreshadowed his NHL career. A rugged defender with improving offensive skills, Kluzak had a promising start, but during the 1983-84 preseason, he injured his knee, needed surgery and was out for a year. Though he recovered and helped the Bruins reach the 1988 Stanley Cup Final, he never played another full season. Plagued by chronic knee woes, he attempted three brief comebacks with Boston, one of them worthy of the 1990 Bill Masterton Trophy for perseverance and dedication, and retired in 1991. — Notable picks: No. 2: Brian Bellows, LW, Minnesota North Stars | No. 5: Scott Stevens, D, Washington Capitals | No. 6: Phil Housley, D, Buffalo Sabres | No. 16: Dave Andreychuk, LW, Buffalo Sabres | No. 134: Doug Gilmour, C, St. Louis Blues

1981 | Dale Hawerchuk, C, Winnipeg Jets

Hawerchuk scored 45 goals and 58 assists his rookie season, winning the Calder Memorial Trophy in 1981-82. A five-time All-Star who scored at least 100 points in five of his first six seasons, Hawerchuk was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001. — Notable picks: No. 2: Doug Smith, C, Los Angeles Kings | No. 4: Ron Francis, C, Hartford Whalers | No. 8: Grant Fuhr, G, Edmonton Oilers | No. 15: Al MacInnis, D, Calgary Flames | No. 40: Chris Chelios, D, Montreal Canadiens | No. 56: Mike Vernon, G, Detroit Red Wings | No. 72: John Vanbiesbrouck, G, New York Rangers

1980 | Doug Wickenheiser, C, Montreal Canadiens

Many Canadiens' fans, particularly French Canadian fans who desperately wanted the club to select french-speaking star Denis Savard, were unhappy with the selection of Wickenheiser. While Wickenheiser struggled to adjust to the NHL game, Savard (drafted third overall) would quickly become a superstar with the Blackhawks. In 556 games with five teams, Wickenheiser scored 111 goals and 165 assists. In October 1997, just three years after Wickenheiser's playing career ended, doctors discovered an inoperable form of cancer in his lung. He died on January 12, 1999, at the age of 37. — Notable picks: No. 2: Dave Babych, D, Winnipeg Jets | No. 3: Denis Savard, C, Chicago Blackhawks | No. 4: Larry Murphy, D, Los Angeles Kings | No. 6: Paul Coffey, D, Edmonton Oilers | No. 69: Jari Kurri, RW, Edmonton Oilers

1979 | Rob Ramage, D, Colorado Rockies

Ramage became a top two-way defender and four-time All-Star who played 15 seasons for eight teams, including Calgary's 1989 Stanley Cup-winner and Montreal's in 1993. He's also the answer to a trivia question: Who put the puck into his own team's net, enabling Billy Smith of the Islanders to become the first NHL goaltender credited with scoring a goal? — Notable picks: No. 2: Perry Turnbull, C, St. Louis Blues | No. 4: Mike Gartner, RW, Washington Capitals | No. 8: Ray Bourque, D, Boston Bruins | Michel Goulet, LW, Quebec Nordiques | No. 48: Mark Messier, C, Edmonton Oilers | No. 69: Glenn Anderson, RW, Edmonton Oilers