Why F1’s top teams are so divided on suspension

Giorgio Piola
motorsport.com

And there couldn't be any clearer sign of this that with regards to what Mercedes, Ferrari and Red Bull have done at the front of their cars – with the placement of their steering assemblies, suspension arms and type of heave dampers all showing a different approach.

In this article we will take a close look at what the teams have done, and why their approaches have ended up being so different in the chase for the smallest of performance advantages.

What Mercedes has done

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Ferrari SF1000 front suspension

Ferrari SF1000 front suspension <span class="copyright">Giorgio Piola</span>
Ferrari SF1000 front suspension Giorgio Piola

Giorgio Piola

Ferrari has been the least pro-active of the lead trio when it comes to optimising its front-end layout for 2020, favouring design continuity and ease of setup over what could be considered bold missteps.

Ferrari SF70H front suspension

Ferrari SF70H front suspension <span class="copyright">Giorgio Piola</span>
Ferrari SF70H front suspension Giorgio Piola

Giorgio Piola

2017: The start of its current design continuity, as the team uses an exposed layout that makes it very easy to make general set-up changes.

Ferrari SF90, front suspension

Ferrari SF90, front suspension <span class="copyright">Giorgio Piola</span>
Ferrari SF90, front suspension Giorgio Piola

Giorgio Piola

2019: The SF90's front-end is almost identical to this year's car, with small changes made to optimize its package.

It appears that Ferrari has decided that the performance of its front suspension was sufficient that it warranted putting more emphasis on other areas of the car over the last few seasons.

Red Bull tries something unique

Red Bull Racing RB 16 front suspension

Red Bull Racing RB 16 front suspension <span class="copyright">Giorgio Piola</span>
Red Bull Racing RB 16 front suspension Giorgio Piola

Giorgio Piola

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