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Texas Teacher Running for President Under Legal Name, 'Literally Anybody Else'

The man, originally named Dustin Ebey, legally changed his name in January

<p>WFAA/Youtube</p> Literally Anybody Else

WFAA/Youtube

Literally Anybody Else's Driver's License

Looks like Texas voters may have another choice for president when they head to the ballots in November. In addition to Joe Biden and Donald Trump, voters could also see an option for Literally Anybody Else.

Ahead of the upcoming election, a 7th grade math teacher and U.S. Army veteran from North Richland Hills, Texas, has legally changed his name to Literally Anybody Else with the intention of running for president as an independent candidate, per multiple outlets including NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth and WFAA ABC 8. The 35-year-old was previously known as Dustin Ebey.

"For too long have Americans been a victim of its political parties putting party loyalty over governance. Together lets send the message to Washington and say, 'You will represent the people or be replaced,' " Literally Anybody Else's biography on his website reads.

"America should not be stuck choosing between the 'King of Debt' (his self-declaration) and an 81 year old. Literally Anybody Else isn’t just a person, it’s a rally cry. Join the movement in any way. Donate. Volunteer. Share with a Friend."

Now hoping his campaign serves as a "beacon of hope and innovation," the veteran has taken some big steps to get his name out there — and to get it legally changed.

Related: Trump's 2024 Veepstakes Have Begun: A Look at His Top Choices for Running Mate

As he told NBC DFW this week, the educator had his name changed in January to emphasize being discontent with this year's presumptive Republican and Democratic candidates, noting that Americans want something "different" and "better."

He even secured the LiterallyAnybodyElse.com domain name last year, and he has been selling T-shirts in a move which began as a joke and now has become quite serious as he campaigns to get his name on the ballot.

"I didn't change my name when it was a joke. I would not have changed my name. My father-in-law puts it nicely that that juice was not worth the squeeze," Literally Anybody Else told NBC DFW.

The outlet also notes that Literally Anybody Else will need 113,151 signatures of registered voters who didn't vote in the primaries by May 13 to even continue his journey toward the White House, citing Texas law.

<p>LiterallyAnybodyElse.com</p> Potential 2024 presidential candidate Literally Anybody Else

LiterallyAnybodyElse.com

Potential 2024 presidential candidate Literally Anybody Else

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The candidate, who could be seen campaigning before a recent Dallas Stars hockey game while wearing a T-shirt featuring his new name, even has "Literally Anybody Else" printed on his driver's license.

"There really should be some outlet for folks like me who are just so fed up with this constant power grab between the two parties, that has just no benefit to the common person," Literally Anybody Else told the outlet.

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For those seriously considering Literally Anybody Else, his website offers a look at where he stands politically on affordable housing, small business success, health care, taxes and more.

The teacher, who WFAA noted started with "centrist" beliefs, emphasized how there isn't a "neither" option on the ballot for people who share his hopes for an additional candidate.

"This kind of fills that role," he said.

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