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Six Flags plans a summer 'strollerpalooza' to get families back to its parks

six flags
The water park at Six Flags Fiesta Texas.Six Flags
  • Six Flags plans a "strollerpalooza" this summer to bring families back, The Wall Street Journal reported.

  • Jeffrey Siebert of Six Flags Fiesta Texas said it had revamped designs and added kid-friendly rides.

  • Park attendance nosedived last year after the company increased its average tickets prices.

Six Flags is planning a revamp aimed at getting families to come back to its parks in a bid to revive revenues and the company's stock price.

Speaking to The Wall Street Journal, Six Flags Fiesta Texas's president Jeffrey Siebert said the company was planning a "strollerpalooza" this summer, referring to plans to increase the numbers of families visiting its attractions.

Hopes of winning a family-focused clientele are being pinned on a range of initiatives and revamps. They include new child-friendly rides and rollercoasters, an esports facility, and a redesign of its water parks to make them look more tropical, according to the report.

In Texas, Siebert told The Journal his park had installed three meat smokers to spread the smell of barbecue through the grounds and encourage patrons to eat more.

"In the industry, we call this a 'kiss good night'," he said. "First impressions matter, but so do last impressions."

The moves come after Six Flags increased prices from $28.73 to $35.99 last year in a bid to boost revenues. However, that decision led to a 30% decline in attendance in 2022.

The average spend by Six Flags visitors was up 7% this year, though.

In August last year, Six Flags CEO Selim Bassoul drew criticism when he said lower prices had turned its parks into "a day care center for teenagers." He also said he was trying to turn Six Flags customers from "the Kmart, Walmart to maybe the Target customers." Some said his remarks were classist.

Shares in Six Flags have fallen 62% over the past five years, leaving the company worth just over $2.2 billion.

Read the original article on Business Insider