People are sharing their bad DIY haircuts as coronavirus self-isolation prevents visits to the hairdressers

Caroline AllenContributor
Yahoo Style UK
People are unable to see their hairdressers. (SWNS)
People are unable to see their hairdressers. (SWNS)

Social distancing amid the coronavirus outbreak has put many a routine appointment on hold – including the likes of nails and haircuts.

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In lieu of being able to visit the hairdressers, people are sharing their weird and wacky home haircuts with the nation.

The self-cut styles are offering up a moment of laughter in difficult times with more and more people sharing their haircuts-gone-wrong each day.

Josh went for a full-on bowl. (SWNS)
Josh went for a full-on bowl. (SWNS)

Perfecting a decent fade isn’t easy, yet without their usual barber appointments, many people are attempting this difficult to master trick at home.

Read more: The best comfortable bras to wear while working from home

The trim usually sees the hairdresser use a razor to create a seamless line from the bottom of the hair (where it’s at its shortest) to the top - where it’s longer.

Despite the years of practice it takes to add the perfect fade to your arsenal, desperate DIY hairdressers are trying to recreate the look at home.

Perfecting the fade is no easy feat. (SWNS)
Perfecting the fade is no easy feat. (SWNS)
This fade didn't quite work out as planned. (SWNS)
This fade didn't quite work out as planned. (SWNS)

It’s one of those styles that might seem like a good idea until you start trying it - at which point it’s too late to turn back.

Luckily, many hairdressers who are unable to help due to social distancing are still on hand to talk you through some of the trickier styles.

Hairdresser Jordanne Barnard has offered her top tips on how to do a fade at home before you can get to a real hairdresser to perfect your attempt.

“Start by picking the largest number you want to achieve on the clippers. Let’s say you’ve chosen number three.

“Choose where you want the fade to start from and clipper up to that point using the half guard (three and a half). The trick here is to reach that point and the flick your wrist on the way out of the hair.

“Go over the same sections but a centimetre lower than the starting point on the hair. This time, though, use a number two.

“Finally, repeat again a centimetre lower, but this time with a number one paying extra attention to around the ears. Be careful.

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“If you notice any areas where it hasn’t blended properly, go back over it using the half guard and the number that corresponds with that part of the hair.

“To finish, take the guard off entirely and neatly follow the hairline and square off the nape of the neck using bare clippers.”

If you don’t happen to have a half guard on your clippers, you can always use a comb at a 45 degree angle where the two sections meet to create the same effect.

If you need a little trim on top, Barnard recommends: “Use the back fade as a guideline and pull the hair 90 degrees from the head and trim with the scissors in a point like angle. This will texturise it, hide any lines and take away the weight.”

Read more: The unexpected benefits of social distancing

It’s not the only haircut causing issues, though – in fact, they all are.

We’ve all noticed hairdressers wet our hair ahead of cutting it, so when Lara decided to start by wetting her fringe, she had the best intentions.

Somehow, though, the 22-year-old cut off a little too much than she meant to and ended up taking a huge triangle chunk out of her fringe.

Lara had the best intentions. (SWNS)
Lara had the best intentions. (SWNS)
She started by wetting her hair. (SWNS)
She started by wetting her hair. (SWNS)

The problem she faced is that by pulling the hair down too much, she inadvertently cut off way more than she needed to.

If you don’t know what you’re doing the golden rule has to be less is more. It’s better to do a little regular trim than cutting it all off. If that does happen, though, there are plenty of hair growth shampoos and conditioners to help it grow back quickly.

Latest coronavirus news, updates and advice

Live: Follow all the latest updates from the UK and around the world

Fact-checker: The number of COVID-19 cases in your local area

Explained: Symptoms, latest advice and how it compares to the flu

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