NBA: Firm will probe Suns after report of racism, misogyny

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PHOENIX (AP) — The NBA has asked a law firm to investigate the Phoenix Suns after a published report on Thursday detailed allegations that owner Robert Sarver has a history of racist, misogynistic and hostile incidents during his 17-year tenure in charge of the franchise.

ESPN said it talked to dozens of current and former team employees for the story, including some who detailed inappropriate behavior by Sarver. Most of the allegations are from anonymous sources but a few are on the record.

In ESPN’s report, Sarver denied or disputed most of the allegations through his legal team. The Suns also strongly denied the report in a lengthy statement released Thursday.

“I would entirely welcome an impartial NBA investigation which may prove our only outlet for clearing my name and the reputation of an organization of which I’m so very proud,” Sarver said.

Sarver will get his wish. The NBA released its own statement from executive vice president of communications Mike Bass saying the allegations were “extremely serious” and that the league has asked the Wachtell Lipton law firm to “commence a comprehensive investigation.”

“The NBA and WNBA remain committed to providing a respectful and inclusive workplace for all employees," Bass said. "Once the investigation is completed, its findings will provide the basis for any league action.”

Among the allegations: Former Suns coach Earl Watson said the Sarver was upset that Golden State forward Draymond Green used the N-word during a game in 2016 and that the owner repeated the N-word several times when voicing his displeasure. Watson said he told Sarver that he can't use that word.

Watson was the Suns' coach for all or part of three seasons before being fired three games into the 2017-18 season.

Sarver said in his statement that Watson was “clearly not a credible source.”

“While there is so much that is inaccurate and misleading in this story that I hardly know where to begin, let me be clear: The n-word is not part of my vocabulary,” Sarver said. “I have never called anyone or any group of people the n-word, or referred to anyone or any group of people by that word, either verbally or in writing. I don’t use that word.”

The report also details a story about how Sarver passed around a picture of his wife in a Suns bikini to employees. The report says more than a dozen employees also said Sarver had a history of “making lewd comments in all-staff meetings."

In ESPN's story, Bass said the NBA had not “received a complaint of misconduct at the Suns organization through any of our processes, including our confidential workplace misconduct hotline or other correspondence.”

Sarver has owned the Suns since 2004. The 59-year-old Phoenix businessman also owns the WNBA’s Phoenix Mercury.

The Suns are coming off one of the most successful seasons in their history, making the NBA Finals with stars Devin Booker, Chris Paul and Deandre Ayton before losing in six games to the Milwaukee Bucks. The Suns have made the Finals three times, in 1976, 1993 and 2021, but have never won a championship.

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More AP NBA coverage: https://apnews.com/hub/NBAand https://twitter.com/AP_Sports

David Brandt, The Associated Press

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