Alabama Heisman winner blames Tide's loss vs. LSU on presence of President Trump

Jack BaerYahoo Sports Contributor

After a dominant showing by the LSU offense on Saturday, Alabama’s perfect record, 31-game home win streak and College Football Playoff hopes have taken a significant hit.

One of the program’s great players has an interesting theory on what caused the costly loss.

Baltimore Ravens running back Mark Ingram, who won the Heisman Trophy in 2009 with the Crimson Tide, tweeted that he was blaming President Donald Trump for the loss, saying his appearance created something called “bad swacky” for the Tide.

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Ingram might not have been entirely serious, though, considering he followed up the tweet with another agreeing that LSU quarterback Joe Burrow and running back Clyde Edwards-Helaire might deserve a larger share of the blame.

The running back has tweeted a few times about Trump before, mostly in a mocking fashion before the 2016 election.

President Trump's appearance at LSU-Alabam preceded some bad breaks for Alabama. (Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)
President Trump's appearance at LSU-Alabam preceded some bad breaks for Alabama. (Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)

Ingram isn’t wrong that Trump’s appearance marked the beginning of Alabama’s troubles, however. It’s just a question of correlation vs. causation.

Trump was shown and loudly applauded by the Bryant-Denny Stadium crowd during Alabama’s opening drive on Saturday, in which the Tide had effortlessly moved into the red zone in LSU territory.

What followed was a series of disasters that Alabama never recovered from. Quarterback Tua Tagovailoa immediately fumbled in inexplicable fashion to give LSU the ball. The Tigers drove 92 yards to take the lead, scored again with a field goal following another Tide turnover and got bailed out on a bonehead Alabama penalty that wiped out a Burrow interception.

Alabama eventually lost 46-41, but Trump had already left during the fourth quarter.

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