'Invisible Man' director throws support behind Snyder Cut of 'Justice League'

Gregory WakemanContributor
Yahoo Movies UK
Ben Affleck as Batman
Ben Affleck as Batman

Australian director Leigh Whannell has thrown his weight behind the release of Zack Snyder’s cut of Justice League, insisting that he’d be mortified if his intended version of a film wasn’t released. 

Whannell, who has previously worked on the Saw and Insidious franchises, but most recently wrote and directed The Invisible Man, recently made this admission on the Reel Blend after being quizzed about the Snyder Cut movement, as well as director’s cuts in general. 

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“To me, I never wanna have another cut sitting somewhere that competes with the original cut,” he insisted. “I guess what I’m saying is, whatever circumstances created that cut, whatever horrible circumstances are totally understandable. For me personally, I would always view it as a terrible thing that there was an unseen cut of the film.”

MADRID, SPAIN - FEBRUARY 19: Australian director Leigh Whannell attends 'El Hombre Invisible' ('Invisible Man') photocall at Villa Magna Hotel on February 19, 2020 in Madrid, Spain. (Photo by Pablo Cuadra/FilmMagic)
MADRID, SPAIN - FEBRUARY 19: Australian director Leigh Whannell attends 'El Hombre Invisible' ('Invisible Man') photocall at Villa Magna Hotel on February 19, 2020 in Madrid, Spain. (Photo by Pablo Cuadra/FilmMagic)

“Over the years, you’ll see this thing where it’s like, ‘James Cameron rereleases the director’s cut of Aliens.’ And then he’ll introduce it. When you watch it, he comes on the screen and he says, ‘This is the way I always intended people to watch Aliens.’ And my first thought is, ‘That’s nuts!’ Don’t... have one definitive version of the movie. I hate this idea that we missed out on the version he wanted us to see.”

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Later on in the same interview, the discussion turned to the original version of Blade Runner, which included a voiceover that Ridley Scott detested, and this provoked Whannell to add, “And that’s the situation I’m saying would be a nightmare, would be someone forcibly changing a film that I had made to such a degree that I felt the version out there was not the true version. That is a living nightmare that I don’t want to live.”

The Invisible Man is now out in UK cinemas. 

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