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Ex-B.C. Housing CEO Shayne Ramsay no longer with Squamish Nation's development arm

The former CEO of B.C. Housing, Shayne Ramsay, is pictured here in an interview with CBC Vancouver. He is now no longer with the Squamish Nation's development arm. (CBC - image credit)
The former CEO of B.C. Housing, Shayne Ramsay, is pictured here in an interview with CBC Vancouver. He is now no longer with the Squamish Nation's development arm. (CBC - image credit)

The former CEO of B.C. Housing is now out of the job that he held at the Squamish Nation's economic development arm, as the fallout from a bombshell conflict-of-interest report continues.

Ramsay was the executive vice-president of the Nch'ḵay̓ Development Corporation (NDC) since he retired from his job at the provincial Crown corporation, B.C. Housing, in August last year.

The NDC manages the nation's businesses, including the large Sen̓áḵw housing development on Vancouver's False Creek. Ramsay tweeted that he was appointed there two months after his retirement.

Now, a week after an audit found that Ramsay directed public funds to the non-profit run by his wife, Janice Abbott, the NDC says he is no longer with the organization in a one-line statement sent to CBC News.

It did not reveal whether Ramsay left voluntarily or was fired, as well as what led to the departure. CBC News has reached out to the NDC for an interview.

CBC News also reached out to Ramsay, but was unable to get through.

The NDC's website no longer contains Ramsay's bio and a description of his responsibilities.

In the forensic audit, conducted at the behest of B.C. Premier David Eby, investigators "found a structured and systematic breaching of the conflict of interest rules" at the most senior level of B.C. Housing, including altered meeting minutes, missing financial documents and millions of dollars spent without necessary approvals.

The report concluded Ramsay had directed funds to Abbott's non-profit, Atira Women's Resource Society.

It has sparked a conversation around the public housing infrastructure in the province and whether the current model will stand the test of time.