Cubs sued for allegedly violating disability laws with Wrigley Field renovations

  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
·1 min read
In this article:
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.

The Ricketts family vowed to renovate Wrigley Field after purchasing the Chicago Cubs in 2009. It took five years and multiple phases to complete those renovations, which are now the subject of a new lawsuit, according to the Chicago Tribune.

The U.S. attorney's office in Chicago filed suit against the team Thursday, alleging the new renovations fail to make the park "accessible" for fans who use wheelchairs or have other disabilities. The lawsuit comes after a three-year investigation aimed at determining whether the renovations complied with the Americans With Disabilities Act.

The lawsuit focuses on the location and the sight lines provided for guests using wheelchairs. In both the bleachers and lower grandstand, fans in wheelchairs are unable to adequately view the field from their seating areas when spectators are standing. In general admissions areas, the view of the field is somewhat obstructed by pillars, which were not removed during renovations. The Cubs also failed to provide wheelchair seating in new premium club spaces, per the Tribune.

The Cubs were sued in 2018 by a fan who alleged wheelchair seating was worse at the park following renovations. At the time, a team lawyer claimed accessibility at Wrigley Field was "significantly increased." In 2019, the Cubs added more wheelchair seating at the park.

Thursday's lawsuit suggests wheelchair seating at Wrigley Field remains an issue even after the 2019 renovations.

The Cubs were sued Thursday for allegedly violating disability laws. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)
The Cubs were sued Thursday for allegedly violating disability laws. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)
Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting