Coronavirus: The shops and brands extending return delivery dates for people who are self-isolating

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Certain brands are changing their policies to extent return delivery dates amid the coronavirus outbreak (Getty Images)
Certain brands are changing their policies to extent return delivery dates amid the coronavirus outbreak (Getty Images)

In an effort to contain the coronavirus outbreak, the government has asked people avoid all non-essential journeys out of the house - except for reasons such as food shopping or exercise.

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Responding to the new measures, a host of brands who have been forced to close stores have been tweaking their returns policies so those in isolation can still get a refund on unwanted products.

For people who wish to send back items they purchased online, the Post Office remains open and many supermarkets and newsagents which take parcels are also still running like normal.

However, a host of retailers have confirmed that customers who would like to bring back purchases in person will have a lengthy window to do so once their premises reopen again.

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These are extensions various shops and brands have put in place to help out customers in lockdown...

John Lewis

The department store, which has temporarily closed all its shops, has confirmed it will honour late returns.

On their website, they state: “If you have been unable to return an unwanted item due to self isolation restrictions, we will honour a late return as long as the item meets the other terms of our returns policy including a valid proof of purchase such as a receipt or delivery note.”

Smaller items can be collected by carriers “if left in a safe place”, but the same won’t be possible for larger items, like appliances and furniture.

Primark

The chain, which has closed all its stores last week, has extended its returns policy.

In a statement, they said: “We have extended our Refund & Exchange policy in light of our temporary store closures and the impact COVID-19 may have on our customers.

“Products purchased on or after February 1st 2020 can be returned for 28 days after the date our stores in the country of purchase re-opens”

New Look

To ease consumer’s worries, the fashion chain - which shut up shop on Saturday - have extended their normal returns policy for three months.

In a statement to The Sun, they explain: “This policy applies to all items purchased, whether full-priced, promotion or sale. So long as you made a purchase with us after 16th February 2020, you can still get a refund.

“As all our UK & ROI stores are temporarily closed, any purchases you have made in store that were within the 28 day returns period as of 16th March 2020, can be returned with a valid receipt until 15th June 2020.”

H&M

They have announced they will be extending their returns policy from the usual 28 days up to a hundred days for all items bought in-store or online.

The clothes shop closed all its premises on Sunday for an initial two-week period.

Topshop

Due to the pandemic, the fashion brand has closed all of its 300-odd stores indefinitely.

Regarding returns, they explained that in-store purchases can be returned within 14 days once stores reopen.

This also applies to other stores under the Arcadia umbrella - including Dorothy Perkins, Burton, Wallis, Miss Selfridge and Evans.

Fenwick

The department store, who last week closed their stores, have also made extra allowances for shoppers.

They state: “Fenwick will honour the standard returns period for any items bought within the last 27 days (since Friday 21 Feb) once our stores re-open at a later date. 

“This means that if you have an item you want to return and bought it on or after Friday 21 Feb, but have not been able to get to your local store before they closed today (19th March), we will still accept the item once we re-open, for a period of 28 days.”

Clarks

The shoe brand have introduced a generous extension.

They state: “Customers who wish to make a return or exchange products purchased in-store should hold onto their items and receipt as proof of purchase until our stores reopen.

“At this point, we will honour any late returns – in line with the other terms in our returns policy – for a period of 28 days. Additional exceptions will be made on a case by case basis where necessary.”

River Island

The fashion chain, who have temporarily closed outlets, have likewise given an extension for customers who bought items in-store.

They now have 28 days from when shops reopen to bring unwanted products back.

However, those who made purchases online still generally have the usual 28-day window.

TK Maxx

Shoppers can return items bought within a 30-day period once stores reopen.

Harrods

The department store have also temporarily shut up shop.

On their website, they explain: “If you wish to return your item(s) in store, we will be extending our returns period for 28 days after we reopen our store.

“Please keep the receipt of the item you need to return and look out for further information. 

“Our online returns are operating as normal.”

Reiss

The brand have also updated their returns policy.

They state: “You can now return any online items within 60 days from purchase.

“In-store purchases can be returned back to stores within 30 days of our stores reopening again, this includes sale items. Goods must be within their original condition with all tags intact.”

Gap

The chain - who have closed shops - have given customers until July 1st of this year to return all purchases made between January 1st and March 31st.

HMV

The brand have also tweaked their policy so that shoppers have until the end of April to return items purchased this month.

They explain that if restrictions are still in force at the end of April, then they will review this and may seek to give customers even greater flexibility.

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