Coronavirus cases in Canada: More than 10,000 cases reported, 130 deaths

Yahoo News Canada

Yahoo News Canada is committed to providing our readers with the most accurate and recent information on all things coronavirus. We know things change quickly, including some possible information in this story. For the latest on COVID-19, we encourage our readers to consult online resources like Canada’s public health website, World Health Organization, as well as our own Yahoo Canada homepage.

Scroll to continue with content
Ad


Total COVID-19 cases in Canada: 11,118 diagnoses and 130 deaths (as of April 2, 3:00 p.m. ET)

  • Alberta - 871 cases, 11 deaths (142 resolved)

  • British Columbia - 1,066 cases, 25 deaths (606 resolved)

  • Manitoba - 167 cases, 1 death (11 resolved)

  • New Brunswick - 91 cases (14 resolved)

  • Newfoundland and Labrador - 183 cases, 1 death (10 resolved)

  • Northwest Territories - 2 cases

  • Nova Scotia - 193 cases (16 resolved)

  • Ontario - 2,793 cases, including 53 deaths (831 resolved)

  • Prince Edward Island - 22 cases (3 resolved)

  • Quebec - 5,518 cases, 36 deaths (29 resolved)

  • Saskatchewan - 193 cases, 3 deaths (30 resolved)

  • Yukon - 6 cases (3 resolved)

  • CFB Trenton - 13 cases


Authorities in Canada are working to contain the spread of COVID-19, which the World Health Organization deemed a pandemic in mid March.

Provinces and territories around the country have ramped up their testing, leading to an increase in cases, but also delays in results that may not reflect the most recent measures that have been applied by officials and citizens, such as social distancing.

Officials say Canadians have contracted the disease while travelling in other countries from all over the world. Certain cases in Canada, which are linked to travel, have led to human-to-human transmission between close contacts. There have also been of signs of community spread in provinces such as Ontario, British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Nova Scotia and Newfoundland and Labrador.

In order to contain the spread, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has restricted Canada’s borders, provinces and territories have declared states of emergencies, while people returning back to Canada must self-isolate for 14 days upon return under the Quarantine Act.

Those who don’t need to necessarily isolate are still being asked to practice social distancing. It involves keeping at least two metres away from others in social settings and staying home when possible in order to limit the spread.

Timeline of coronavirus cases in Canada - March 2020

For cases before March 23, 2020, see our timeline here.

Nova Scotia identifies 20 new cases

Date reported: April 2

Along with extending the province’s state of emergency for another two weeks, officials announced 20 more COVID-19 patients in Nova Scotia.

There are now 193 total cases in the province. Among the diagnoses, one is confirmed to be the result of community transmission, but there are others still under investigation.

Five people are in hospital, but 16 people have recovered from the virus.

As of April 2, health officials have also completed 7,446 negative tests for the virus, to go along with 193 confirmed cases.

New Brunswick diagnoses 10 more patients

Date reported: April 2

There are now 91 cases of COVID-19 in New Brunswick after health officials diagnosed 10 more patients on Thursday.

The new cases range in age from 20-79. Five are in Fredericton region, two in Edmundston, one in Saint John, and a first in the Miramichi region.

Of the total cases, 49 are linked to travel, 25 to close contacts who are also patients, three to community transmission, while 14 remain under investigation. Three people are also in hospital, including one in intensive care.

Twenty-two people have since recovered from the virus, while two people have been discharged from hospital, according to a press release by the province’s health officials.

Prince Edward Island reports a new case

Date reported: April 2

One more person has been diagnosed with COVID-19 in P.E.I., increasing its case count to 22.

The individual is a man in his 50s from the Queens County area who recently travelled internationally.

As of April 2, the province has administered almost 1,000 tests for COVID-19, according to a press release by health officials in P.E.I. Three people have since recovered from the virus.

Manitoba identifies 40 more cases

Date reported: April 2

Among Manitoba’s 40 new cases are three involving health care workers across two different facilities, Health Sciences Centre (HSC) in Winnipeg and Betel Home in Gimli.

Betel Home is also investigating a respiratory illness among nine residents, as they await results for their COVID-19 tests.

Among the province’s 167 total cases, five are in hospital, including four in intensive care. Eleven people have also recovered from the disease, according to the province's chief public health officer Dr. Brent Roussin.

Quebec reports 907 new cases, more fatalities

Date reported: April 2

Health officials in Quebec have diagnosed 907 new cases of COVID-19, bringing its total count to 5,518. There were also three more deaths in the province within the last 24 hours, increasing its death toll to 36.

Among the province’s total cases, 365 people are in hospital, including 96 in intensive care. More than 500 long-term care facilities in the province have also reported at least one case of COVID-19.

Montreal has identified 545 new patients in the past 24 hours, increasing its case count to 2,642. Eight more regions in the province have at least 100 cases.

As of April 2, Quebec health officials have seen 69,024 negative test results, while 4,871 people are under investigation for COVID-19.9.

Eight more cases in Newfoundland and Labrador

Date reported: April 2

There are now 183 cases of COVID-19 in Newfoundland and Labrador after health officials diagnosed eight more patients all located in the Eastern Health region.

Among the province’s total cases, 11 of them are in hospital, including four in intensive care. There are now 143 linked to Caul's Funeral Home in St. John's, where one patient attended a pair of funerals between March 5 and March 7.

As of April 2, the province has tested 2,929 people for the virus.

Ontario brings Canada’s case count to over 10,000

Date reported: April 2

With health officials in Ontario reporting 401 new COVID-19 patients, there are now more than 10,000 cases of the virus across Canada.

Along with the new cases, the Ministry of Health reported 16 deaths in Ontario since Wednesday. It brings the province’s case count to 2,793 and its death toll to 53.

There are also now 831 people who have recovered from the virus, an increase of 142 resolved cases in a 24-hour span. Also among the province’s total number of cases are 405 people in hospital, including 167 in intensive care and 112 on ventilators to deal with the respiratory disease.

As of April 2, the province has administered 62,733 tests for COVID-19, while 2,052 people are still under investigation.

Information on the 16 new victims has yet to be released.

Following Wednesday morning’s Ministry of Health update, which presents the numbers that are current as of 4 p.m. the evening before, two more deaths were reported at the Pinecrest Nursing Home in Bobcaygeon, Ont., six more at Seven Oaks nursing home in Scarborough, and two more in the Lambton Public Health Unit.

Following Thursday’s Ministry of Health update, two additional deaths were reported at the Pinecrest Nursing Home, bringing the total to 17 at the long-term care home.

Various news organizations have reported discrepancies in the Ministry of Health’s numbers compared to the tallies of individual public health units, saying there are in fact more deaths and cases in Ontario than what’s being reported.

Associate chief medical officer Dr. Barbara Yaffe said it might be because individual public health units haven’t updated their latest stats to the province’s data base, before updating their own websites.

“I realize they are very busy and there are a lot of things happening and putting data into a database doesn’t feel that important,” said Yaffe on Wednesday. “But it is important so we can be as up to date as possible and as transparent as possible – that’s what we all want.”

According to the Toronto Star, which has tallied all 34 regional public health units’ statistics, there are 2,965 cases of COVID-19 and 85 deaths as of Thursday morning in Ontario.

Yukon identifies its sixth case, resolves half of them

Date reported: April 1

Health officials reported a sixth case in Yukon, but also said that three of them have since recovered from COVID-19.

The latest case involves an individual who returned from Europe within the last couple weeks. They started to self-isolate in Whitehorse before showing symptoms, and are currently doing well, said Yukon’s chief medical officer Dr. Brendan Hanley.

As of April 1, the territory has administered 722 tests for the virus, while results are still pending for 26 people.

B.C. reports 53 more cases, one more death

Date reported: April 1

Twenty-five people have now died in British Columbia, as health officials announced one more fatality in Fraser Valley, to go along with 53 new COVID-19 cases.

The latest update brings the province’s case count to 1,066.

Among the patients, 142 are in hospital, including 67 in intensive care. There is also at least one case in 21 seniors’ care facilities across the province.

As of April 1, 606 patients have recovered from the virus, according to provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry, while 44,639 people have been tested.

Alberta reports 117 new cases, two more deaths

Date reported: April 1

Officials in Alberta reported 117 new cases of COVID-19, to go along with two more deaths.

The rise in cases is because health officials went through a backlog yesterday of over 4,500 tests. About 98 per cent of them came negative, which is in line with their usual percentage, according to Alberta’s chief medical officer Dr. Deena Hinshaw.

The latest fatalities related to COVID-19 involve two men in their 80s, one in the North zone and the other in the Calgary zone. It brings the death toll to 11 in the province.

Hinshaw said of the province’s cases, 94 may be the result of community transmission. There are also 41 cases among four continuing care facilities in Alberta.

As of April 1, the province has been able to resolve 142 cases since the patients have recovered from the virus. Health officials have also completed 53,141 tests for COVID-19.

Ontario sees its highest surge in cases

Date reported: April 1

To go along with four more deaths, Ontario diagnosed 426 more people with COVID-19 on Wednesday, marking the highest increase in daily reported cases since the start of the outbreak.

There are now 2,392 cases of COVID-19 in the province, which includes 37 deaths, according to the Ministry of Health’s website. Among the patients, 332 are in hospital, including 145 in intensive care and 98 people who are ventilators.

There are also 689 people who have recovered from the virus, which is an increase of 258 resolved cases in a 24-hour period.

As of April 1, the province has tested 57,874 people for COVID-19, while there are 3,135 people still under investigation.

It’s unclear at this moment who are the four new fatalities.

Following the update by the Ministry of Health, the Canadian Press reported that there were two more deaths among patients at the Bobcaygeon, Ont. nursing home, where 12 residents and 1 volunteer have already passed away. The Haliburton, Kawartha, Pine Ridge District Health Unit is also reporting that 24 staff members have been infected.

Six new deaths were also reported at the Seven Oaks nursing home in Scarborough, bringing the total to eight. The nursing home has 23 confirmed cases, which includes six residents (and the eight deaths) to go along with nine staff members.

The Lambton Public Health Unit also reported two more deaths, bringing their total to six. Four of the deaths are affiliated with the Landmark Village, a seniors residence in Sarnia. Ont. One of the two most recent fatalities involves an individual in their 80s, while the second is in their 70s. They both tested positive for COVID-19 after passing away.

Various news organizations have reported discrepancies in the Ministry of Health’s numbers compared to the tallies of individual Public Health Units, saying that they are in fact more deaths and cases in Ontario than what’s being reported. Both the Toronto Star and CTV News reported that there are in fact 68 deaths across the province, when the Ministry of Health was only reporting 37 as of 10:30 on April 1.

Associate chief medical officer Dr. Barbara Yaffe said it might be because individual public health units haven’t updated their latest stats to the province’s data base, before updating their own websites.

“I realize they are very busy and there are a lot of things happening and putting data into a database doesn’t feel that important,” said Yaffe. “But it is important so we can be as up to date as possible and as transparent as possible – that’s what we all want.”

The Toronto Star has since reported that as of 5 p.m. on April 1, there are 2,806 confirmed or probable COVID-19 cases in Ontario, including 82 deaths across the 34 public health units in the province.

The CBC is also reporting that at least 40 deaths are among people at nursing and retirement homes in Ontario.

Third death in Saskatchewan

Date reported: April 1

A Saskatchewan resident in their 80s has passed away due to complications relating to COVID-19. It marks the third death in the province.

To go along with the news, health officials reported nine new cases in the province, bringing its total to 193.

Among the province’s total cases, eight are in hospital, including four in intensive care. Of the cases, 87 are linked to travel, 41 to close contacts, while eight have no known exposures, meaning they could be the result of community spread. Fifty-seven of the cases are still under investigation. Thirty people have also recovered, an increase of nine in the 24 hours.

As of April 1, there are 24 cases that can be traced back to a Christopher Lake snowmobile rally dinner held on March 14. The province has also completed 10,528 tests for COVID-19.

Second case in the Northwest Territories

Date reported: April 1

A second individual in the Northwest Territories has been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to health officials.

The patient is in self-isolation with mild symptoms in their home in Inuvik. They returned to the territory on March 21 after visiting British Columbia, and developed symptoms five days later.

As of April 1, 979 people for the virus in N.W.T., while two of them come back positive.

11 more cases in New Brunswick

Date reported: April 1

There are now 81 cases of COVID-19 in New Brunswick, after health officials diagnosed 11 new patients.

The new cases range in age from 20-60 years old. Two of them are in hospital, bringing the province’s total to four.

Of the 81 total cases, 43 are linked to travel as the reason for transmission, 22 to close-contact, and three due to community transmission. There are 13 cases that are still under investigation, while 14 people have recovered the virus.

Manitoba signs ‘early signs’ of community transmission

Date reported: April 1

To go along with reporting 24 new cases of COVID-19, health officials in Manitoba said they’re seeing “early signs” of community transmission.

Dr. Brent Roussin, the province’s chief public health officer, said there are several cases that can’t be linked to travel.

In total, Manitoba has 127 patients. Four people are in hospital, including three in intensive care, while four people have also recovered from COVID-19.

As of April 1, the province has administered 10,004 tests for the virus.

Nova Scotia identifies 26 new cases

Date reported: April 1

Health officials announced 26 more cases of COVID-19 in Nova Scotia, increasing its total to 173.

Among the new cases, one is a staff member at The Magnolia residential care home in Enfield, which now has three staff members and two residents who have tested positive. Two other nursing homes in Nova Scotia have also been infected, according to a press release.

Of the province’s 173 cases, one has been confirmed to be the result of community transmission, but health officials are expecting more as the outbreak continues. There are 11 people who have recovered from the virus, while the province has seen 6,591 negative tests for COVID-19 as of April 1.

Quebec reports two more deaths, 449 cases

Date reported: April 1

Premier Francois Legault announced two additional fatalities and 449 cases in Quebec, bringing the province’s totals to 33 and 4,611, respectively.

Among all the cases, 307 are in hospital, including 82 in intensive care.

Montreal continues to have the most cases among all regions in Quebec, with 2,097. The Montérégie region has at least 400, Laval and Estrie have at least 300, Quebec City, Mauricie-et-Centre-du-Québec, Lanaudière, Laurentides have at least 200, while there also are over 100 cases in Chaudière-Appalaches.

As of April, there have been 65,082 negative COVID-19 results in Quebec, while there are 5,770 people under investigation.

Newfoundland and Labrador reports 23 new cases

Date reported: April 1

There are now 175 cases of COVID-19 in Newfoundland and Labrador after health officials diagnosed 23 more patients.

All of the new cases are in the Eastern Health region.

Among the province’s total cases, 15 people are in hospital, including three in intensive care. One person has died, but there are now 10 people who have recovered.

As of April 1, the province has completed 2,816 tests for COVID-19.

Alberta reports latest death, 64 new cases

Date reported: March 31

Dr. Deena Hinshaw announced a third death at a Calgary long-term care home on Tuesday, the third in that facility and the province’s ninth.

There were 64 new cases in the province, bringing Alberta’s total to 754, including 120 patients who have recovered from the COVID-19 virus.

B.C. reports 43 new cases and five deaths

Date reported: March 31

Dr. Bonnie Henry announced British Columbia had diagnosed 43 more patients with COVID-19, pushing the province’s total to 1,013.

There were also five new deaths in B.C., pushing the province’s total to 24 and Canada’s total to 100.

Dr. Henry said 19 long-term and assisted-living facilities in the province were experiencing outbreaks.

Saskatchewan reports eight new COVID-19 cases

Date reported: March 31

As of Tuesday, there are 184 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Saskatchewan. There are reported cases in the Far North, North, Central, Saskatoon, South and Regina regions, with 90 of the cases in Saskatoon. 83 of the cases are people ages 20 to 44, 64 are aged 45 to 64, 31 are 65 years or older, and six are 19 years old or younger.

Manitoba identifies seven new cases

Date reported: March 31

The provincial tally of COVID-19 cases has risen to 103 with seven more announced Tuesday. The total cases include a health worker at Selkirk Regional Health Centre, where the individual worked in the facility’s emergency department and medical ward from March 19 to 23. Public health is following up with anyone who may have come in contact with the individual.

New public health orders will take effect in the province starting April 1, which include restricting the operation of non-critical businesses. You can read about what is affected on the Manitoba government’s website.

New Brunswick adds two more cases to tally

Date reported: March 31

A total of 70 people in New Brunswick have been diagnosed with COVID-19 after two more individuals were identified on Tuesday.

One of the cases is related to travel, while the other is tied to association with another COVID-19 patient. The individuals are in their 20s and 60s, and in the Fredericton and Edmunston regions.

Chief medical officer of health Dr. Jennifer Russell says that just because there have been some low-number days this week, it doesn’t mean residents should be less vigilant.

“Just because we have had a couple days of low new-case numbers, now is not the time to be complacent,” said Russell. “We will have good days and bad days, but we cannot lose focus.”

Quebec reports six more deaths

Date reported: March 31

On Tuesday, the province announced six more people who had COVID-19 had died. The total number of cases in the province also rose to 4,162.

The increase represents a 21 per cent increase in 24 hours, which is in line with what public health officials had been expecting, given the recent trajectory of cases.

Nearly half of the cases (1,991) are reported to be in the Montreal public health region. Cases have been reported in all regions of the province.

There are 5,601 cases still under investigation for COVID-19, and a total of 63,378 who have tested negative for the virus.

Prince Edward Island identifies more travel-related cases

Date reported: March 31

Three new COVID-19 cases were identified by the province on Tuesday. During a press conference, chief public health officer Dr. Heather Morrison said all three cases were related to international travel, and all three are self-isolating at home. She said that one case is a man in his 20s, while the other two are women, one in her 30s and the other in her 40s.

On the province’s hotline, 60 complaints were made Monday about people who were not staying at home.

Newfoundland and Labrador ties multiple cases to funeral

Date reported: March 31

A funeral that took place between March 15 and 17 in St. John’s is tied to 120 of Newfoundland and Labrador’s 152 confirmed COVID-19 cases. The province’s one death related to COVID-19 is also tied to Caul’s Funeral Home. According to medical officials no one knowingly violated a quarantine order, and they are urging the public not to point fingers at any individual.

"Nobody went out and intentionally spread this," Dr. Janice Fitzgerald, Newfoundland and Labrador’s chief medical officer of health, said Sunday. "This happened at a time when we didn't have the same measures in place that we do now.”

Nova Scotia identifies 20 new cases

Date reported: March 31

The province announced on Tuesday that 20 more people had been diagnosed with COVID-19, bringing the provincial total to 147. Nova Scotia reported Monday that one of those cases is a confirmed community transmission. It also confirmed that four of the patients are public health employees.

Nova Scotia is also closely watching cases in long-term care homes. Currently there are four staff and two residents of long-term care facilities who are positive for COVID-19.

Affected individuals include four who are currently in hospital. Across all cases ages range from under 10 to over 80.

Ontario cases just shy of 2,000

Date reported: March 31

Ontario saw 260 new COVID-19 cases identified over the last 24 hours, a 15.2 per cent jump from Monday’s total. The province now has 1,966 cases and 33 deaths related to COVID-19.

Of the COVID-19 patients in Ontario, 49.8 per cent of them are male, 49.5 per cent are female, and 12 cases are not known; 1,496 cases are between the ages of 20 and 64, while 46 are under 20 and 421 are over 64. The Greater Toronto Area public health unit accounts for 59.1 per cent of cases. While transmission is unknown for 47.3 per cent of cases, it has been confirmed that 25.7 per cent of patients travelled in the 14 days prior to becoming ill, 10.2 per cent of patients had close contact with a known COVID-19 case, and 16.8 per cent had neither.

Early Tuesday morning, a Bobcaygeon, Ont. nursing home confirmed that three more of its residents had died. In total, 12 residents and one volunteer at Pinecrest Nursing Home have died with links to COVID-19. At least three other residents and 24 staff members (about a third of the home’s staff) have tested positive for COVID-19. Since the Pinecrest Nursing Home information came in after the 4:00 p.m. reporting deadline Ontario follows, the most recent cases and deaths from the nursing home are not yet included in the provincial statistics.

Yukon announces one more case

Date reported: March 30

Yukon said it confirmed its fifth case in the territory on Monday. Chief medical officer Dr. Brendan Hanley said the case could be part of a “cluster investigation” from which “one or two” other cases could be expected. In total, 688 people in Yukon have been tested; 90 tests are still pending.

Alberta reports five more deaths

Date reported: March 30

Alberta’s chief medical officer Dr. Deena Hinshaw called Monday “one of the hardest days yet” as she announced five patients died of COVID-19 complications, bringing the province’s total to eight. One of the victims was a man in his 30s. The other four were two women in their 50s and 70s and two men in their 80s.

There were 29 new cases in Alberta, bringing the total number to 690.

Ontario sees biggest single-day jump in cases

Date reported: March 30

Reporting for a second time on Monday, Ontario announced a total of 1,715 cases in the province, and a total of 33 deaths. Ten more people were reported to have died related to COVID-19.

While Ontario’s official tally remains at 23 deaths, associate chief medical officer Dr. Barbara Yaffe said during an afternoon conference that 10 more deaths have been reported since the morning update. It is unknown what the specifics are of the cases, but Dr. Yaffe confirmed the deaths were in Haliburton, Lambton, Haldimand Norfolk and Huron Perth public health regions.

At a press conference on Monday, Premier Doug Ford advised that all people over the age of 70 should stay at home and self-isolate.

“We need to protect them,” Ford said.

Of Ontario’s confirmed cases, 26.3 per cent had travelled within 14 days of falling ill, 9.6 per cent had close contact with someone confirmed to have COVID-19, 16.2 per cent had neither, and the remaining 47.9 per cent were still pending exposure information.

B.C. identifies 86 new cases over the weekend

Date reported: March 30

From Saturday to Monday, 86 new cases were identified in British Columbia, according to provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry. This brings the province’s total to 970. B.C. confirmed two more deaths, bringing the province’s total to 19.

Saskatchewan reports first COVID-19-related deaths

Date reported: March 30

Two people (not in the same location, but both in hospital) are reported to have died, Saskatchewan reported on Monday. Both patients were in their 70s. This marks the first and second COVID-19-related deaths the province has seen since the beginning of the pandemic. The province also reported that 20 more people had tested positive.

Manitoba nears 100 cases

Date reported: March 30

Twenty-four additional cases of COVID-19 have been identified in Manitoba, bringing the total number of cases to 96 for the province.

Four people are currently hospitalized due to COVID-19 in Manitoba, and one of those individuals is currently in intensive care. Investigations are currently underway to determine how it was transmitted.

Manitoba has performed 8,550 tests so far, including 1,430 over the weekend.

Quebec cases climb past 3,000

Date reported: March 30

Twenty-five people have died due to COVID-19 in Quebec, Premier François Legault said in his daily briefing on Monday. The province also reported an increase in the number of cases, with Quebec’s total now reaching 3,430. Among them, 235 people are hospitalized and 78 of them are in intensive care.

In the premier’s briefing, he also outlined additional measures the province would be taking to support Quebecers in the fight against COVID-19: all retailers will now be closed on Sundays and $133 million in aid would be made available for seniors’ residences and other facilities supporting vulnerable populations.

Nova Scotia identifies five more cases

Date reported: March 30

Five more people have been identified as having COVID-19, bringing the province’s total number of cases to 127. The province also said on Monday that it had determined at least one of the cases was from community spread and not related to travel.

Of the 127 total cases, patients range in age from under 10 to mid-70s. Four individuals are in hospital.

Seven new cases in Prince Edward Island

Date reported: March 30

A total of 18 people have been diagnosed with COVID-19 in P.E.I., as seven new cases were announced on Monday. The new cases are between the ages of 20 and 80, and include four women and three men.

P.E.I. opened a phone line earlier this month for residents to report people who were not adhering to social distancing procedures. Since it opened, the line has received about 2,000 calls, averaging 900 per week. Over the weekend, the province followed up on 56 complaints, issued 12 verbal warnings and nine written warnings.

Newfoundland reports its first death

Date reported: March 30

The province reported its first death attributed to the COVID-19 virus on Monday, along with 13 new positive cases, bringing the provincial total cases to 148. All new cases reported were in the Eastern Health region for the province.

The deceased was a retired man in the Eastern Health region. He passed away on Sunday, reportedly deteriorating quickly after being hospitalized about three days earlier.

According to the CBC, Newfoundland has the second-highest rate of infection per-capita in the country.

Second surge in as many days in Ontario

Date reported: March 30

Ontario saw the highest single-day increase for a second day in a row, this time with 351 new cases of COVID-19 on Monday. No new deaths were reported.

The increase comes after Ontario Premier Doug Ford invoked the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act to prevent gatherings of more than five people in the province over the weekend. Exceptions exist for families of more than five people, and child-care centres supporting frontline health care workers.

Alberta reports 40 new cases, one more death

Date reported: March 29

Health officials in Alberta have reported more 40 cases of COVID-19, but also the province’s third death.

It brings the province’s case count to 661, after its smallest rise in daily reported cases since March 21.

No new information about the most recent fatality has been made available, since Alberta did not host a press conference Sunday, but instead issued a news release.

Of the 40 new cases, 11 of them are at the McKenzie Towne Long Term Care home, which now has 26 total diagnoses.

Among the province’s total cases, 41 are in hospital, which includes 14 in intensive care. Up to to 60 cases may be the result of community transmission. There are also 73 people who have recovered.

Ontario sees new record surge in cases, four more deaths

Date reported: March 29

To go along with 211 new diagnoses of COVID-19, marking the highest daily rise in cases since the outbreak started, health officials also reported four more deaths.

It brings the province’s case count to 1,355, and its death toll to 23. Two of the deaths have still not been confirmed by a lab.

One of the fatalities involves a man in the Haldimand-Norfolk Health Unit, who was a resident of a retirement home in the area. It marks the first fatality in the region. No other information about the individual, such as his reason for transmission, has been provided.

It’s unclear at this moment who are the other three fatalities in the province.

According to the Toronto Star, more than 100,000 residents in Ontario have been “directed to seek immediate medical assistance” after using the province’s online assessment tool. While another 500,000 were directed to self-isolate because of their symptoms.

As of March 29, health officials have tested 49,186 people for the virus. The province continues to see a decrease of how many people are under investigation, which there are currently 7,203 patients. Among the province’s 1355 cases, eight have recovered, and 21 people have passed away.

Saskatchewan reports 22 new cases, four new recoveries

Date reported: March 29

Health officials in Saskatchewan have diagnosed 22 more people with COVID-19, increasing the province’s total case count to 156. Four more people have also recovered, brining the number of resolved cases to eight.

Five people are in hospital, including two in intensive care. Among the patients, seven are believed to be the result of community transmission. The rest of the cases are linked to travel or mass gatherings.

Health officials continue to report diagnoses linked to a Christopher Lake snowmobile rally dinner held on March 14. Of the approximately 130 people at the dinner, health officials have reached 76 of them and diagnosed 20.

As of March 29, the province has administered 9,086 tests for COVID-18.

New Brunswick sees its biggest rise in cases

Date reported: March 29

Fifteen more people have tested positive for COVID-19 in New Brunswick, marking the biggest increase in cases in a 24-hour span in the province.

Of the province’s 66 total cases, two of them have recovered from the virus. The Fredericton region is home to the most patients with 23. There are 17 in the Moncton region, 15 in the Saint John region, seven in Campbellton region, and four in Edmundston region.

Health authorities are still working to understand if any of the new patients contracted the disease through community transmission. New Brunswick saw its first sign of community spread March 28.

Quebec reports 342 new cases, brings Canada’s case count to over 6,000

Date reported: March 29

There are now 2,840 cases of COVID-19 in Quebec, after health officials diagnosed 342 more people. The latest update also brings Canada’s total case count to over 6,000.

Among the province’s cases, 22 have died, while 192 are in hospital, which includes 72 in intensive care.

Montréal continues to lead the province with 1,361 cases, while the Québec City, Mauricie-et-Centre-du-Québec, Estrie, Laval, Lanaudière, Laurentides and Montérégie regions all have over 100 patients.

As of March 29, the province has also seen 49,364 negative COVID-19 tests, while 6,313 are still under investigation.

The jump in cases in Quebec this week is due to a change in process: cases that tested positive by hospital laboratories are now considered confirmed and no longer need to be validated by the Quebec Public Health Laboratory.

Premier François Legault cites the fact that Quebec had its March break before all other provinces. When kids had time off between March 2-6 in Quebec, there weren’t nearly as many measures in place across the country to contain the spread as there were when the rest of the provinces had their spring break from March 16-20.

Newfoundland and Labrador detects 15 new cases

Date reported: March 29

Health officials diagnosed 15 more people with COVID-19, bringing the province’s case count to 135.

All 15 of the new cases are in the Eastern health region.

Among the province’s total cases, seven are in hospital, including two in intensive care, while four people have recovered. About 99 of the cases can also be traced back to Caul's Funeral Home in St. John's, where one patient attended a pair of funerals between March 5 and March 7. According to Premier Dwight Ball, it marks the largest cluster of cases in the country.

As of March 29, the province has tested 2,107 people for COVID-19.

Nova Scotia identifies COVID-19 in long-term care home workers

Date reported: March 29

Three workers at separate Nova Scotia long-term care homes have been diagnosed with COVID-19, health officials announced.

The homes include Magnolia residential care home in Enfield, R.K. MacDonald Nursing Home in Antigonish, and Lewis Hall, a private retirement community in Halifax. All three workers tested positive before showing symptoms.

The recent news is among the 12 positive tests the province has had in the past 24 hours, bringing their total case count to 122.

Most of the province’s cases are being linked to travel or to another close contact, but health officials are still investigation potential community spread. As of March 29, the province has also seen 4,731 negative tests.

Eight more cases in Manitoba

Date reported: March 29

Health officials in Manitoba have diagnosed eight more people with COVID-19, increasing their total case count to 72.

Investigations into how the eight people contracted the disease is still ongoing.

Among the province’s total cases, two people are in hospital, including one in intensive care. Sixty of the cases live in Winnipeg, while each region has a case except for Northern Health. There are also two people who have recovered from the virus.

As of March 29, at least 7147 people have been tested.

Alberta announces new cases, new recoveries

Date reported: March 28

While Alberta diagnosed 79 new cases of COVID-19 in the province, it also reported 20 new recoveries.

There are now a total of 621 cases in Alberta, including two deaths and 53 recoveries. Among its patients, 38 are in hospital, which includes 12 in intensive care.

As of March 28, health authorities in the province have tested 42,527 people for the virus.

Saskatchewan sees record surge

Date reported: March 28

Health officials in Saskatchewan have diagnosed 30 more people in the province, increasing their cases count to 134.

It marks the biggest increase in daily reported cases in the province.

Among Saskatchewan’s total cases, seven of them are believed to be the result of community transmission. The rest are linked to travel or large mass gatherings. Health officials said in a press release that 18 cases have been linked to a Christopher Lake snowmobile rally dinner held on March 14. All 18 patients are now in self-isolation at home.

Among the province’s cases, six are in hospital, which includes three in intensive care. Four people have also recovered from the virus.

As of March 28, the province has completed 8,248 tests for COVID-19.

British Columbia continues to see recoveries

Date reported: March 28

Among the province’s 884 total cases, 396 of them have recovered, according to provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry.

The province’s case count rose to 884 when they announced 92 new cases in B.C., to go along with one more death in the Vancouver Coastal Health region. More information about the fatality has not been provided at the moment.

Henry said the about 45 per cent recovery rate is due to two reasons. The province started to see a substantial rise in cases before everyone else, which included health care workers with mild cases. Therefore, patients in B.C. started to recover before everyone else.

People who have mild cases, and don’t have to go to hospital, are also being considered recovered if they’re symptom-free for 10 days. It’s a method that’s being adopted internationally, and has been approved nationally, since patients aren’t considered to be contagious after being asymptomatic for at least 10 days. Henry said other provinces, such as Ontario, are considering the criteria for their own patients.

People in B.C. with severe forms of the illness, and who have to go to hospital, still need to have two negative COVID-19 tests that are 24 hours apart in order to be considered resolved.

Among the province’s cases, 81 are in hospital, which includes 52 in intensive care. There are now also 12 long-term care homes that have a COVID-19 diagnosis among a resident or staff member, said Henry.

Nova Scotia surpasses 100 cases

Date reported: March 28

Twenty more people have been diagnosed with COVID-19, bringing Nova Scotia’s case count to 110.

It’s the biggest increase in daily reported cases in the province.

The reason for transmission for “most” of the patients is travel or close contact with another patient, but “public health cannot confirm community spread as several cases are still under investigation,” said a press release.

Among the 110 cases is an employee at R.K. MacDonald Nursing Home in Antigonish, and a staff member at Lewis Hall, a private retirement living community in Dartmouth.

The 110 cases range in age from under 10 years old to mid-70s. Three patients are in hospital, while four people have also recovered form the virus.

To date, Nova Scotia has also seen 4,031 negative COVID-19 test results.

Quebec reports four deaths, brings Canada’s case count to over 5,000

Date reported: March 28

Health officials in Quebec have reported four more fatalities among COVID-19 patients, bringing the province’s death toll to 22.

More information about the recent deaths has not been made available.

Along with the fatalities, officials diagnosed 477 people with COVID-19, which increases Canada’s total case count to over 5,000, and Quebec’s to 2,498.

Canada had just reached 4,000 cases March 26; 3,000 cases March 25; 2,000 cases March 23; and 1,000 cases March 20.

Among the Quebec’s cases, 164 of them are in hospital, which includes 57 in intensive care.

In the past 24 hours, Montreal has seen an increase of 248 cases, for a total of 1,129. The Estrie, Laval, Québec City, Lanaudière, Laurentides and Montérégie regions all also have over 100 cases.

As of March 27, health officials in the province have also seen 43,589 negative COVID-19 tests, while 6,757 people are still under investigation.

The jump in cases in Quebec this week is due to a change in process: cases that tested positive by hospital laboratories are now considered confirmed and no longer need to be validated by the Quebec Public Health Laboratory.

New Brunswick surpasses 50 cases

Date reported: March 28

Six more people have been diagnosed with COVID-19 in New Brunswick, according to a press release by health officials, bringing the case count to 51.

The new cases range in age from 20 to 79 years old. Two of them are located in the southeast region of the province, and four in the south.

Among the province’s 51 cases are also two people who have since recovered from the virus.

Newfoundland and Labrador reports community spread

Date reported: March 28

There is now a case of community transmission in Newfoundland and Labrador, said provincial chief medical officer of health Dr. Janice Fitzgerald.

The patient’s source of infection can’t be linked to travel or another close contact who’s been diagnosed with COVID-19.

Health officials in the province have also diagnosed 18 more people with COVID-19, bringing their case count to 120. Of the 18 new diagnoses, 16 are in the Eastern Health region, and one each in Central Health and Labrador-Grenfell Health regions.

There are now also two people in N.L. who are in hospital, while four people have recovered from the virus.

Manitoba identifies 25 new cases

Date reported: March 28

There are 64 cases in Manitoba, after health officials diagnosed 25 more patients with COVID-19.

Among the patients, one is in intensive care, according to chief provincial public health officer Dr. Brent Roussin. It marks the second person who’s had to go to hospital with the virus. The first involved a Winnipeg woman in her 60s, who passed away March 27.

Roussin said the province has also started to see recoveries, but that they can’t release numbers at the moment. Among the current cases, all are connected to travel or close contact with another patient.

Ontario surpasses 1,000 cases, sees one more death

Date reported: March 28

With health officials reporting 151 new diagnoses in Ontario, the province’s total case count has risen to 1144.

One more fatality in Ontario was also reported, involving the first death in the Middlesex-London region. A man in his 70s passed away Friday night in a hospital in London, Ont., after being diagnosed March 19. He had recently travelled to Portugal.

Among the cases are now eight people who have recovered and 19 patients who have since passed away. On the province’s Ministry of Health website, they said that two of the deaths have still not been confirmed by a lab.

Unlike previous updates, officials did not provide a breakdown of the new cases, which usually includes the patients’ age bracket, public health unit, reason for transmission and recovery status. Instead, “information for all cases today is pending.”

As of March 28, the province has tested 43,072 people for COVID-19. Among those tests, 33,240 have come back negative. There are 8,690 people who are still under investigation, but it’s a decrease compared to a day prior when there were over 10,000.

British Columbia reports two deaths, more recoveries

Date reported: March 27

Two more people in British Columbia have died after contracting COVID-19, bringing the province’s death toll to 16.

There are also 67 additional cases, increasing their case count to 792. Among those cases, 275 have recovered from the virus, according to a press release from provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry and Health Minister Adrian Dix.

The two most recent fatalities were reported in the Vancouver Coastal health region, but no other information has been provided.

Among the new cases, are staff members at two additional long-term care homes in the Fraser Health region, being The Harrison at Elim Village and Chartwell Independent Living at Langley Gardens. There are now 11 long-term care homes in the Vancouver Coastal and Fraser Health regions that have confirmed cases of COVID-19.

Among the province’s total cases are 73 people in hospital.

Earlier in the day, Henry said that physical distancing restrictions in B.C. have successfully helped slow the number of COVID-19 cases, even by as much of half.

"I'm trying not to over-call it, but I do believe we've seen a flattening, a falling-off of that curve," said Henry. "What we need, though, is for everybody to continue to pay attention to these [physical distancing] measures so we can continue to prevent transmissions in our communities ... for the coming weeks."

As of March 27, the province has tested 36,643 people for virus.

Fourth case in Yukon

Date reported: March 27

A fourth person has been diagnosed with COVID-19 in Yukon, according to public health officials.

The most recent patient is a close contract of the territory’s third case, which was announced March 25. The third patient in the territory recently travelled outside of Yukon, but still within Canada.

Along with the news about the fourth case, Premier Sandy Silver announced a state of emergency that will last 90 days.

Alberta surpasses 500 cases

Date reported: March 27

There are now 542 cases in Alberta, after health officials identified 56 new cases of COVID-19.

Among the new cases are two patients at the Mckenzie Towne facility, a long term care home in Calgary that now has 15 patients.

Among the province’s total cases, 42 are believed to be the result of community transmission from an unknown source, said the province’s chief medical officer Dr. Deena Hinshaw.

There are also 23 people in hospital, including 10 in intensive care, while there are 33 people in Alberta who have recovered from the virus.

As of March 27, the province has also seen 37,673 negative test results for COVID-19.

Saskatchewan surpasses 100 cases

Date reported: March 28

Health officials in Saskatchewan have diagnosed nine more people with COVID-19. It brings their total case count to 104.

Six of the province’s total cases are the result of local transmission, while the rest are travel-related. There are also six people in hospital, which include two in intensive care. Among their patients, four of them are 19 years old or younger. The majority of their cases (49) involve people between the ages of 20-44 years old.

Among the province’s cases are two staff members at the Saskatoon Correctional Centre. They are now in self-isolation, as the province works on an approach for how they’ll manage the inmate population amid the pandemic.

Three people have since recovered from the virus.

As of March 27, the province has tested 7,580 people for COVID-19.

Prince Edward Island reports two more cases

Date reported: March 27

Two more people in P.E.I. have tested positive for COVID-19, increasing their case count to 11.

Both cases involve women from Prince County, one in her 20s and the other in her 50s, who recently travelled internationally.

The two patients are currently doing well and in self-isolation, according to P.E.I.’s chief public health officer Dr. Heather Morrison.

10 more deaths in Quebec, 392 new cases

Date reported: March 28

Ten more people have died in Quebec, according to Premier François Legault, bringing the province’s death toll to 18.

An increase of 392 cases has also been reported, putting Quebec’s total at 2,021.

The jump in overall cases in Quebec this week is due to a change in process: cases that tested positive by hospital laboratories are now considered confirmed and no longer need to be validated by the Quebec Public Health Laboratory.

Among the province’s 2,021 cases, 141 people are in hospital, including 50 in intensive care. There are also 29 people who have since recovered from the virus.

Montreal still leads the way with 971 cases, while the Estrie, Québec City, Laval and Montérégie regions all have at least 100 cases each.

Dr. Howard Njoo, Canada’s deputy chief public health officer, suggested that the rise in cases in Quebec may be because the province had its March break before the rest of country. When kids had time off between March 2-6 in Quebec, there weren’t nearly as many measures in place across the country to contain the spread as there were when the rest of the provinces had their spring break from March 16-20.

As of March 27, Quebec has seen 32,335 negative COVID-19 tests, while there are 7,236 people under investigation.

New Brunswick sees its first recovery, sign of community spread

Date reported: March 28

New Brunswick announced 12 new cases in the province, one of which is being investigated for community spread, said chief public health officer Jennifer Russell.

The other 11 cases can be linked to travel outside of the province.

The rise in confirmed cases brings New Brunswick to 45 total diagnoses. Among the cases, one person has since recovered from the virus.

The group of 12 people range in age from 20-79 years old.

Health officials also said that there was one case each on Air Canada Flight 8900 from Montreal to Moncton on March 16, and Sunwing Flight 169 from Punta Cana to Fredericton on March 18. People on those flights should be self-isolating.

Newfoundland and Labrador surpasses 100 cases

Date reported: March 28

Health officials in Newfoundland and Labrador have reported 20 more cases, raising their case count to 102.

Among their patients, one is currently in hospital because of the virus, which is a first for the province. One patient has also recovered.

Of the province’s 102 cases, 68 are linked to Caul's Funeral Home in St. John's, where one patient attended a pair of funerals between March 5 and March 7.

As of March 27, there have been 1,491 people tested for COVID-19, which has led to 102 positive results and 1,409 negatives. The remaining cases are still under investigation.

Nova Scotia matches record surge

Date reported: March 27

Health officials in Nova Scotia have diagnosed 17 more people with COVID-19, increasing their case count to 90.

It matches their stat from March 25 for the most daily reported cases in the province.

In a press release, health officials said that “most are connected to travel or a known case.” A day earlier, the province said that they couldn’t identify the reason for transmission for one of their cases, but they still can’t confirm if the patient was infected as a result of community spread.

Among their new cases, none are connected to the St. Patrick’s Day gathering in Lake Echo, Halifax Regional Municipality. On March 26, officials said a person, who’s since tested positive, visited the party with 50 attendees.

The province’s 90 patients range in from 10-year-old to mid-70s. Two of them are also in hospital, while three people have recovered. As of March 27, the province has also seen 3,649 negative COVID-19 test results.

Manitoba reports first death, three more cases

Date reported: March 28

One person has died in Manitoba after contracting COVID-19, according to the province’s chief public health officer Dr. Brent Roussin.

It marks the province’s first death relating to the virus, and Canada’s 43rd. Manitoba is now the fifth province to record a fatality, joining Ontario, British Columbia, Quebec and Alberta.

The patient who passed away was a woman in her 60s who was in intensive care earlier this week, said Roussin.

Along with the news, officials reported three more cases in the province, bringing their total to 39.

Starting Monday all gatherings in Manitoba will be capped at 10, which is down from the current 50, in order to contain the spread of COVID-19.

Ontario announces 135 more cases, three more deaths

Date reported: March 27

Ontario has reported 993 cases of COVID-19, which includes eight patients who have recovered and 18 people who have passed away.

Since Thursday, it’s an increase of 135 cases and three more deaths. For the first time this week, Ontario did not see a record increase in daily reported cases. On March 26, they reported 170 cases; there were 100 cases March 25, 85 cases March 24, and 78 cases March 23.

Among the fatalities were two residents of a Bobcaygeon, Ont., nursing home, who were not tested until they passed away. Three other residents have also tested positive, to go along with at least 14 staff members, according to the Haliburton, Kawartha, Pine Ridge District Health Unit. There are also at least 35 residents who have shown symptoms, but haven’t yet been tested.

One more death was reported by the Regional Municipality of York, involving a woman in her 80s, who lived in Vaughan until she passed away March 26. The reason for transmission for all three fatalities has not yet been made available.

Unlike previous updates, the Ministry of Health’s website did not provide a breakdown of the new cases, which usually includes the patients’ age bracket, public health unit, reason for transmission and recovery status. Among the province’s total cases, 60 are in hospital, including 43 in intensive care and 20 on ventilators.

As of March 27, health officials in Ontario have tested 41,032 people for COVID-19. Among their results are 29,967 negative tests, while there are still 10,074 people under investigation.

British Columbia brings Canada’s case count to over 4,000

Date reported: March 28

Canada’s COVID-19 case count has surpassed 4,000 after British Columbia recorded 66 new diagnoses.

A rise in cases nationwide continues at a record rate, with Canada hitting the 3,000-case mark on March 25.

With the update from B.C., it means that there are now 725 cases in the province. That includes the 186 people who have since recovered from the virus, according to provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry.

Of the 66 new patients, there are four residents and three health care workers at Lynn Valley Centre, a long-term care home in North Vancouver that’s recorded 11 of the province’s 14 fatalities. There were also two residents and one health care worker who were diagnosed at Haro Park, another long-term care home that reported a COVID-19-related death March 23.

Among the province’s patients, 66 are in hospital, which includes 26 in intensive care.

Of the 725 cases, 359 are in the Vancouver Coastal Health region, 241 in Fraser Health, 62 in Interior Health, 52 in Island Health, and 11 in the Northern Health region.

As of March 26, officials in B.C. have tested 34,561 people for the virus.

Alberta reports 27 recoveries

Date reported: March 26

There are now 486 patients diagnosed with COVID-19 in Alberta, after health officials identified 67 new cases.

Of the province’s total cases, there are 27 people who have recovered from the virus. There are also 34 people who are believed to have contracted the virus through community transmission.

Of the 486 patients, 21 are in hospital, which includes 10 in intensive care.

A day earlier, the province’s chief medical officer Dr. Deena Hinshaw said that there nine long term care homes that have cases of COVID-19. Since then, only one of them has seen an increase in diagnoses, in the Mckenzie Towne facility in Calgary, which has 13 symptomatic patients.

As of their last update, health officials in Alberta have seen 36,174 negative COVID-19 tests, to go along with their 486 positive results.

Saskatchewan sees more signs of community spread

Date reported: March 26

Health officials in Saskatchewan have diagnosed nine more patients with COVID-19, increasing the province’s total to 95.

Most of the cases are travel-related, but there are five linked to community transmission, which now includes one from the northern part of the province.

Four of the cases involve people 19 years old or younger, while the rest are adults. Among the 95 cases, five people are in hospital, including two in intensive care.

Health officials have now reported that three people have recovered from the virus in the province.

As of March 26, Saskatchewan has tested 6,915 people for the virus.

Four new cases in P.E.I.

Date reported: March 26

There are now nine cases of COVID-19 in Prince Edward Island, after health officials diagnosed four more patients.

All four cases involve men between 55-70 years old, who recently travelled internationally. Two patients were in Europe, one in the Caribbean and one in the United States.

Two of the cases live in Prince County, and the other two in Queens County. All four patients are in self-isolation.

Of the province’s original five cases, one has recovered, according to Dr. Heather Morrison, P.E.I.’s chief public health officer.

Ontario sees another record surge, records two more deaths

Date reported: March 26

Two more people in the Durham Region have died after contracting COVID-19, according to a statement by health officials on March 26.

One of the fatalities includes a man in his 80s, with a recent travel history, but officials have not specified which destinations he visited. The man was hospitalized at Lakeridge Health Oshawa on March 23, and passed away a day later.

The second individual is a male in his 40s who had no recent travel history. He was hospitalized at Lakeridge Health Oshawa on March 19 and passed away March 25.

The Ministry of Health’s website says there are 15 fatalities in the province, but another death was reported in the Simcoe Muskoka District Health Unit, a third for the region. It involved a woman from Orillia in her 70s. According to CTV News, officials believe that she contracted the disease in the community. She had also pre-existing medical conditions. It would bring the death toll to 16, but it has not yet been reported by the Ministry.

Along with the fatalities, Ontario health officials reported 170 new diagnoses of COVID-19, bringing the province’s total case count to 858.

It’s the fourth day in a row Ontario’s surges have been record highs. On March 25, officials reported 100 cases; there were 85 new cases March 24 and 78 cases March 23.

In an afternoon press conference, Toronto’s medical officer of health, Dr. Eileen de Villa said that there are now 339 cases in Toronto. Of the cases, 25 per cent of them are believed to be the result of community spread. It means that officials can’t identify the reason for transmission, such as travel or close contact with another COVID-19 patient.

Among the province’s 858 cases are eight people who have recovered from the virus, and 15 people who have passed away, according to the Ministry of Health’s website. There are also 29 people in intensive care, which includes 20 patients on ventilators.

Information about the newly announced 170 patients is still pending, but at least 12 of them are hospitalized with the virus. That includes five seniors in Lambton and a pair of individuals in their 20s from Toronto and Middlesex London. At least 90 people are also in self-isolation.

Among the 170 cases, five people are under the age of 20. There are also 17 people in their 20s and 25 people in their 30s who were recently diagnosed with COVID-19. The oldest patients are two people in their 90s.

There are 56 people who are believed to have contracted the virus through close contact with another COVID-19 patient, and 35 people with recent travel histories. Destinations include the United States, the United Kingdom, Austria, Costa Rica, Spain, France, Egypt, Dubai, the Philippines, Colombia, Germany, Ecuador, Jamaica and Denmark.

As of March 26, Ontario has tested 38,550 people for COVID-19. Of those results, 26,727 have come back negative, while there are still 10,965 people under investigation. Health officials in Ontario are hoping to ramp up their efforts, to test about 18,900 people a day by mid-April. Currently, the province tests about 3,000 people a day, but they are hoping to reach 5,000 a day by this week.

New Brunswick reports seven more cases

Date reported: March 26

Seven more people have been diagnosed with COVID-19 in New Brunswick, according to the province’s chief medical officer of health Dr. Jennifer Russell.

All seven cases are related to travel, and they bring the province’s total to 33.

Among the new cases, three are in the southeast part of the province, one in the south, and three are in the central west zone. They range in age from 20-70 years old.

In New Brunswick, at least 1,550 people have been tested for the virus.

Newfoundland and Labrador diagnosis 15 new patients

Date reported: March 26

There are now 82 cases of COVID-19 in Newfoundland and Labrador, after health officials diagnosed 15 new patients in the Eastern Health region.

Dr. Janice Fitzgerald, the province's chief medical officer of health, said that the province’s 82 patients are all recovering at home, and that they range in age from eight to 80 years old. The median age of their patients is 55.

The majority of the cases in N.L. are in the Eastern Health region. Of the 76 patients, the majority of them are linked to Caul's Funeral Home in St. John's, said Fitzgerald, where an infected individual attended two funerals between March 15 and March 17.

As of March 26, the province has tested 1,491 people for COVID-19, leading. to1,409 negative tests.

Quebec reports 290 new cases, two deaths

Date reported: March 26

Two more people have died after contracting COVID-19, according to Premier François Legault.

There are now 1,629 cases of COVID-19 in Quebec after health officials diagnosed 290 more patients with the virus.

Among the province’s cases, 106 people are currently in hospital, including 43 in intensive care.

Of the two most recent deaths, one was reported on March 25 by Montreal health officials following the premier’s daily press briefing. It involved an elderly citizen in Montreal and was the city’s first fatality related to COVID-19.

The eighth death is a 91-year-old man in the Laurentians who lived in a seniors' residence, public health officials confirmed Thursday morning.

The jump in cases in Quebec this week is due to a change in process: cases that tested positive by hospital laboratories are now considered confirmed and no longer need to be validated by the Quebec Public Health Laboratory.

As of March 26, the province has had 31, 854 negative COVID-19 tests, while there are 2,622 under investigation. Among their 1,629 confirmed cases, eight people have died and two have recovered. By region, Montreal still leads the way with 782 patients, followed by Estrie, Quebec City, and Montérégie, who all over 100 cases.

Nova Scotia sees signs of potential community spread

Date reported: March 26

Health officials in Nova Scotia have reported five new cases of COVID-19, which includes one case that can’t be linked to travel or close contact with another COVID-19 patient.

“The investigation to determine the source of the exposure and whether any others may have been exposed is ongoing,” said the province in a press release. “At this point, public health cannot confirm that this case is linked to community spread.”

The five new cases bring the province’s total to 73. According to the release, they range in age from under 10 to mid-70s. Among the patients, two are in hospital, while two have also recovered from the virus.

As of March 26, health officials in Nova Scotia have also had 3,201 negative tests for COVID-19 and 73 confirmed positives.

Manitoba reports one more case

Date reported: March 26

There is one new “probable” case of COVID-19 in Manitoba, bringing the province’s case count to 36.

The latest diagnosis involves a man in his 20s who lives in Winnipeg. It’s believed that the individual contracted the disease from a close contact, said the province’s chief public health officer Dr. Brent Roussin.

Among the province’s 36 cases, one person is in intensive care.

As of their last update, health officials have tested 5,606 Manitobans for COVID-19.

B.C. records 42 cases, one more death

Date reported: March 25

Health officials in British Columbia have diagnosed 42 cases of COVID-19, while one more death has been reported in the province.

The updates bring B.C.’s total case count to 659, to go along with 14 fatalities. There are also now 183 people who have recovered from the virus in the province.

The most recent death occurred at the Lynn Valley Centre, a long term care home in North Vancouver, said provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry. It marks the 11th death at the home, but Henry said there have been no new cases in the past 24 hours.

There are now also nine care homes that have identified a case of COVID-19 in B.C., with the most recent one being the Broadway Pentecostal Lodge in Vancouver. A larger outbreak has been identified recently at Haro Park Centre in Vancouver, with 27 staff members and 28 residents testing positive for the virus. However, no one part of the long term care home has been hospitalized, said Henry.

In the province, there are now 55 health care workers who have tested positive for COVID-19. Among the province’s total cases, 64 are in hospital, which includes 26 people in intensive care. Most of the people are over the age of 50, but one individual who has been hospitalized is under the age of 10, said Henry.

Because of travel bans, officials said they’re seeing less cases related to travel, but there are continuing signs of community transmission in the province. As of March 25, officials in B.C. have tested 31,739 people for COVID-19.

Alberta sees highest surge in cases

Date reported: March 25

There are now 419 new cases of COVID-19 in Alberta, after health officials diagnosed 61 new patients with COVID-19.

It marks the biggest rise in daily reported cases in the province

Alberta’s chief medical officer Dr. Deena Hinshaw said up that up to 33 of the patients may have been infected through community transmission.

Of the province’s cases, 20 are in hospital, which includes eight in intensive care.

Health officials also learned that there’s a new cluster of cases at an adult group home for people with development disabilities. As of March 25, one staff member and two residents have been infected.

There are also nine cases at long-term care homes or assisted living facilities in the province among staff or residents. Mckenzie Towne facility in Calgary has six, while there’s one case at Rosedale On The Park and two at Shepherd's Care Kensington Village, which are both in the Edmonton zone.

As of March 25, the province has conducted 35,089 tests for COVID-19, to go along with 419 positive tests.

14 more cases in Saskatchewan

Date reported: March 25

Health officials in Saskatchewan have reported 14 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the province’s total to 86.

Among the total cases, four of them are believed to have been contracted through community spread, meaning they can’t be linked to travel. Saskatchewan reported its first signs of community transmission on March 18.

The rest of the 82 patients’ infections are linked to travel.

Among the province’s total cases, four are 19 years old or younger, 69 of them are 20-64 years old, and 13 are 65 years or older. There are also four people in hospital, which includes two in intensive care, but some were already there for other underlying medical conditions.

There are now 41 cases in Saskatoon, 27 in Regina, three in the North, eight in Central region (excluding Saskatoon) and seven in the South (excluding Regina).

As of March 25, the province has tested 6,270 people for the virus.

Two more cases in P.E.I.

Date reported: March 25

There are now five cases of COVID-19 in Prince Edward Island, after chief public health officer Dr. Heather Morrison announced two more cases.

Both patients are men in their 30s who recently travelled internationally. One of them returned from the U.S. on March 13 and was tested six days later. The other returned from the Dominican Republic on March 19, and was tested March 23.

Morrison said that flight details will soon be released. As of March 25, health officials in P.E.I. have tested 539 people. To go along with the five positive test results, 326 of them have come back negative, while 208 are still under investigation.

One more case in Yukon

Date reported: March 25

A third case of COVID-19 has been diagnosed in Yukon, according to the territory’s chief medical officer of health Dr. Brendan Hanley.

The individual recently travelled outside of Yukon, but still within Canada. They were tested March 23, but results came in Wednesday morning. Officials did not provide more information about their travel history or location, but said the person has mild symptoms and is currently in self-isolation at home.

As of March 25, 517 people in Yukon have been tested for COVID-19. There have been 412 negative results, while 102 individuals are still under investigation. Three people have tested positive, which includes the territory’s first two cases that were announced late March 22.

Eight new cases in New Brunswick

Date reported: March 25

There are now 26 cases of COVID-19 in New Brunswick, after health officials diagnosed eight more patients.

Dr. Jennifer Russell, the province's chief public officer of health, said that seven of the cases are related to travel, while one is believed to have contracted the virus through close-contact with another infected individual who recently travelled.

Three cases each are located in the southeast and south regions of the province, while there is one each in the centre and northwest zones. The eight patients range in age from 10 to 70 years old.

According to a press release, the province has conducted more than 1,700 cases as of March 25.

Quebec brings Canada’s case count to over 3,000, death toll to 30

Date reported: March 25

Health officials in Quebec have diagnosed 326 more cases of COVID-19, bringing their provincial count to 1,339.

Officials also announced three more fatalities in the province. It means that there are now seven COVID-19-related deaths in Quebec, and at least 30 in Canada.

Two of the fatalities were reported at a press conference by provincial officials, while Montreal's regional public health authority reported another death shortly after. The death in Montreal involves a senior citizen and marks the first fatality for the island. No other information about the individual has been provided.

Dr. Horacio Arruda, Quebec’s public-health director, did not want to provide many details on the two other most recent fatalities. Both were “of an advanced age," while neither of them were in a metropolitan area. One of them was connected to travel.

Quebec’s first four deaths occurred at the same seniors home, EVA Lavaltrie residence, in the town of Lavaltrie in the Lanaudière region. There are currently outbreaks in three senior care homes, which includes one each in the regions of Montréal, the Eastern Townships and Lanaudière, said Arruda.

The jump in cases in Quebec this week is due to a change in process — cases that tested positive by hospital laboratories are now considered confirmed and no longer need to be validated by the Quebec Public Health Laboratory.

Among the province’s cases, 78 of them are in hospital, which includes 35 people in intensive care.

Over 600 of the province’s cases are in the Montreal region, while Estrie and Montérégie have diagnosed more than 100 patients.

In Montreal, 31 health care workers have tested positive for COVID-19, but director of public health for the Montreal region Dr. Mylène Drouin could not provide transmission details. People experiencing homeless in Montreal will also be housed in a hotel as they await their COVID-19 results. The decision comes after a homeless man was left to wander the streets of Montreal after his screening, which turned out positive.

As of March 25, Quebec health officials have also had 26,634 negative COVID-19 tests, while there are 2,998 people under investigation. Among their province 1,339 positive cases is one person who has recovered, and six deaths.

Newfoundland and Labrador almost doubles its cases

Date reported: March 25

Health officials have announced 32 new presumptive cases of COVID-19 in Newfoundland and Labrador, which brings their province’s total to 67.

Among the new cases is the first one in the Western Health region, which is believed to be travel-related. The other 31 cases are within the Eastern Health region.

Among the 67 cases, the patients range in age from eight to 78 years old. Health officials also said that 44 of their province’s cases are linked to one Caul's Funeral Home in St. John’s. It was reported March 22 that a person infected with COVID-19, who recently travelled outside the country, visited the home to attended two funerals between March 15 and March 17. Everyone who’s recently been to the funeral home is being asked to self-isolate.

As of March 25, there have been 1,336 people tested for COVID-19 in the province, while 1,269 of them have come back negative.

Nova Scotia sees its biggest rise in cases

Date reported: March 25

Health officials in Nova Scotia have announced that there are now 68 cases of COVID-19 in the province, after diagnosing 17 new patients.

The cases are all related to travel or transmission through close-contact with another COVID-19 patient. Some of the newest cases are connected in groups or families who have recently returned to Nova Scotia after international travel.

The province’s cases range in age from an individual who is younger than 10, to someone in their mid-70s.

One person is in hospital with the virus, but there are two people who have also recovered, according to a press release by the province.

As of March 25, health officials in Nova Scotia have also seen 2,772 negative COVID-19 tests, to go along with 68 positive diagnoses.

Manitoba diagnosis 14 more people

Date reported: March 25

There are now 35 cases in Manitoba, after provincial health officials diagnosed 14 more people with presumptive cases of COVID-19.

Among the new cases is a girl under the age of 10 who lives in Winnipeg. Among the 14 new cases, she is one of 11 people who live in the capitol. The other three cases involve two people in the Southern Health Santé Sud health region, and one from Prairie Mountain Health.

The oldest patients include three people in their 60s. One of them is in intensive care in hospital.

Health officials are still working to understand how the 14 patients became infected, but at the moment it’s believed most of them were through travel or exposure to a close contact who has been diagnosed with COVID-19.

Ontario reports 100 new cases, five more deaths

Date reported: March 25

In addition to announcing 100 new cases of COVID-19 in Ontario, health officials reported that five more people have died in the province after contracting the virus.

The rise in daily cases is the largest the province has seen since the start of the outbreak, and brings Ontario’s total to 688. The five fatalities increases the death toll to 13 in Ontario.

The first fatality that was announced March 25 involved an 84-year-old resident of Ina Grafton Gage Village in St. Catharines, according to the St. Catharines Standard. The individual contracted the disease from a family member who had recently been to Europe, and died 11 days after he was confirmed to have COVID-19 in a hospital in St. Catharines.

Dr. Barbara Yaffe, associate medical officer of health for Toronto Public Health, confirmed the death later in the day and said the patient was male. As part of an afternoon press conference, Yaffe said there are 40 people in the province who are in hospital with COVID-19, which includes 17 people in intensive care and 15 people who are on ventilators.

In the afternoon, Toronto’s medical officer of health, Dr. Eileen de Villa said three more people have died in Toronto after contracting COVID-19. It brings Toronto’s death toll to four, after the city recorded its first fatality March 22.

Of the three most recent fatalities, one of them involves an elderly man with pre-existing health conditions, who was tested at North York General Hospital. The two other patients were residents of the Seven Oaks long-term care home in Scarborough.

In Toronto, de Villa said there are now 319 cases, while 22 of them are in hospital. Of the city’s patients, 16 per cent of them are believed to have been infected through community spread, meaning their diagnoses can’t be traced back to travel.

The fifth fatality was reported on Ontario’s public health website, as the province raised its death toll to 13. No information has been made available about the fifth fatality on Ontario’s website.

In the evening, Ottawa health officials announced the city’s first COVID-19-related death. The fatality involves a man in 90s who was living at home. According to a press release by Ottawa Public Health, the man had no travel history, and developed a fever March 15. He was admitted to hosptial March 20, and died March 25. It’s unclear at this moment if the fatality is Ontario’s 13th.

A lot of information about the 100 patients is currently pending on Ontario’s public health website.

There are at least five people who are hospitalized with the virus. That includes a woman in their 70s, a woman in her 80s, a man and a woman in their 50s from Porcupine District health unit, and a woman in her 20s from the Peel public health unit; it’s unclear how she contracted the virus at this point.

There are also at least 46 people who are in self-isolation.

There are 22 people who are believed to have contracted the virus through recent travel, to destinations such as Spain, France, the Dominican, the United Kingdom, U.S., Philippines, Mexico, U.S., Bahamas, Peru and Egypt.

There are 21 people who are believed to have contracted the virus through close contact with another patient.

Of the 100 new patients, they range in age from their 90s, to a pair of individuals from Toronto and Peel who are listed to be younger than 20 years old.

The new cases are in public health units such as Wellington Dufferin Guelph, York, Toronto, Peel, Halton, Porcupine District, Durham, Windsor Essex, Middlesex London, Hamilton, Simcoe Muskoka, Kingston Frontenac Lennox Addington, Hastings Prince Edward, Haliburton Kawartha Pineridge, Niagara, Peterborough and Timiskaming.

As of March 25, health officials in Ontario have tested 35,635 people. Of those tests, 24,458 have come back negative, while there are still 10,489 still under investigation. Among the province’s 688 confirmed cases, eight are resolved, while nine people have passed away.

B.C. announces 145 new cases

Date reported: March 24

British Columbia announced 145 new COVID-19 cases in the province Tuesday, but provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry noted the data covers almost two days, since Monday’s announcement was made much earlier in the day.

Henry added that 28 per cent of all cases have been resolved as 173 patients recovered from the illness.

“I think that’s a really positive thing,” Henry told reporters. “It shows us that most people – particularly young, healthy people who have milder illness – are able to be managed at home and are recovering from this.”

Alberta announces second provincial death and 57 new diagnoses

Date reported: March 24

Alberta’s chief medical officer Dr. Deena Hinshaw announced the “extremely sad” news of a second COVID-19-related death in the province. The victim was a woman in her 80s at the McKenzie Towne Continuing Care Centre in Calgary.

The province announced 57 new cases, bring its total to 358.

Saskatchewan diagnosis six new cases

Date reported: March 24

Health officials in Saskatchewan have reported six new cases of COVID-19, bringing the province’s total to 72.

Among the total cases in the province, eleven of the patients are 65 or older, 59 of them are 20-64 years old, and two are 19 or under.

Dr. Saqib Shahab, Saskatchewan’s chief medical health officer, said they can’t identify the reason for transmission for four of the cases in the province. It gives evidence that they contracted the disease through community transmission, but the patients are still under investigation.

As of March 24, the province has tested 5,757 people for COVID-19.

Newfoundland and Labrador identify 11 more presumptive cases

Date reported: March 24

The province announced on Tuesday that 11 new presumptive cases that had been identified in the last 24 hours.

All the cases were from the Eastern health region in Newfoundland, and brings the province’s total number of presumptive and confirmed cases to 35.

Sharp uptick in Quebec cases for second consecutive day

Date reported: March 24

Quebec became the first province in Canada to reach 1,000 cases of COVID-19.

Reporting 385 new cases to add to their 628 existing patients, health officials said 67 people were in hospital, 31 of them in intensive care. This means the province now has 1,013 cases.

There were no further deaths reported in the latest announcement on Tuesday afternoon.

All non-essential businesses and services have been ordered to close in the province for three weeks as of midnight Tuesday.

Nova Scotia reports 10 new cases

Date reported: March 24

10 new cases of COVID-19 were identified in Nova Scotia. All of the new cases are travel-related or connected to earlier reported cases.

Several of the new cases are connected to groups or families who have returned to Nova Scotia following travel outside of Canada. None of these cases are from spread within the community.

The 51 individuals affected across the province range in age from under 10 to mid-70s.

Manitoba announces one additional case

Date reported: March 24

One more case was announced in Manitoba, bringing the provincial total to 21.

The newest case is a man in his 40s who lives in Winnipeg. Public health officials say investigators are still working to determine whether it is related to travel.

Ontario reports 85 new cases, two more deaths

Date reported: March 24

On Tuesday, health officials in Ontario reported that 85 more people have tested positive for COVID-19, to go along with two more fatalities.

It brings the province’s case count to 588, and death toll to eight.

A woman in her 90s from the Durham Region has died, but the cause of how she contracted the virus is still pending. She was a resident at a long-term care home in Oshawa, where five people have tested positive.

Later in the day, health officials also announced that a woman in her 80s at a Hamilton nursing home passed away.

Of the cases that have been confirmed, 18 are related to travel to other countries, including Austria, Brazil, the United Arab Emirates, the United States, Italy, Singapore and the United Kingdom.

Among the new patients, five are from individuals have close contact with someone who is positive for COVID-19. They include a woman in her 30s from Hamilton, a woman in her 30s and a man in his 40s from Ottawa, a man in his 30s from Toronto, and a woman in her 40s from York Region.

The remaining cases are all awaiting confirmation of the source of transmission. They are from public health units based in Kingston, Waterloo, Brant, Peel, Halton, Wellington, Grey Bruce, Windsor, Niagara, Sudbury and Durham.

Saskatchewan identifies 14 more cases

Date reported: March 23

The province has found 14 new cases of COVID-19, bringing Saskatchewan’s total to 66. One case is presumptive and awaiting confirmation.

Two of the cases are people between the ages of five and 19, while the rest are adults. The majority (61 per cent) of people diagnosed with COVID-19 in the province are male.

British Columbia death toll reaches 13

Date reported: March 23

B.C. public health officials announced on Monday that three more people who had COVID-19 have passed away, bringing the total number of COVID-19-related deaths to 13.

The province also announced 48 new cases to bring B.C's total number of cases to 472, while notifying the public 100 people have now recovered from the virus.

Among the three newly reported fatalities, one is at the Lynn Valley Care Centre in North Vancouver, where nine other residents have passed away. The second fatality is at the Haro Park Centre, another long term care home in Vancouver. The third fatality involves an elderly person living in Fraser Health.

Of the province’s 472 cases, there are also 33 people in hospital, which includes 14 in intensive care.

Newfoundland and Labrador more than doubles its amount of cases

Date reported: March 23

Health officials in Newfoundland and Labrador diagnosed 15 new presumptive cases of COVID-19, bringing the province’s count to 24.

Of the new patients, one is in the Central Health region, while the other 14 are in the Eastern Health region.

Quebec cases rocket to 628

Date reported: March 23

In the biggest single day increase for any province to date, Quebec public health officials announced an increase of 409 cases on Monday, bringing the province’s total to 628.

The jump in cases is due to a change in process — cases that tested positive by hospital laboratories are now considered confirmed, and no longer require validation by the Quebec Public Health Laboratory (LSPQ). The majority of these cases are in the Montreal public health region, with a total of 265 cases.

Among the province’s 628 cases, four people have died and one person has recovered from the virus. As of March 23, the province has also had 11,211 negative tests, while there are 1,888 people under investigation.

Manitoba identifies new probable case, resolves another

Date reported: March 23

Manitoba identified an additional probable case on Monday, but ruled out another probable case when results returned negative for COVID-19. Manitoba’s total probable cases count remains at 20.

The latest probable case in the province is a man in his 50s who lives in Winnipeg. It is suspected that the case is related to travel.

Public health officials are now advising all residents in the province avoid non-essential travel, including health care providers. The province is now recommending anyone who returns from travel should enter a 14-day self-quarantine.

Nova Scotia has 13 new cases

Date reported: March 23

Nova Scotia identified 13 new cases of coronavirus, bringing the new total in that province to 41.

Among the new cases is one involving a child. The province says the latest cases are all travel-related or related to previously reported cases.

Several of the new cases are connected and involve groups or families who have returned to Nova Scotia after travelling outside Canada.

Ontario reports 78 more cases

Date reported: March 23

Health officials in Ontario reported a further 78 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the province’s total to 503.

It marks the highest jump in daily reported cases in the province.

Among the new cases, 14 were travel-related as patients returned to Canada from countries including the United States, Costa Rica, Spain, Italy, Jamaica, Egypt and Switzerland. All of the travel-related patients, except one, are self-isolating. A woman in her 50s from the York region has been hospitalized.

Of those who tested positive, the reason for transmission for 16 patients was close contact with another infected person. Patients were from the York Region, Toronto, Ottawa, Peel Region, Eastern Ontario Region, Hamilton, Durham and Hastings Prince Edward. Their ages range from a woman in her 20s to a man in his 70s.

Details on 48 other patients listed on Ontario’s public health website were pending.

For a timeline of cases from Jan. 25 - March 22, please check our full-roundup here.

What to Read Next