CBC Sports extends coverage plans to include women's sitting volleyball

·2 min read
Canada's Danielle Ellis spikes the ball during a sitting volleyball game at the Rio 2016 Paralympics. CBC Sports has expanded coverage plans to include live streams of Canada's first two women's sitting volleyball matches from the Tokyo 2020 Paralympics. (Atsushi Tomura/Getty Images - image credit)
Canada's Danielle Ellis spikes the ball during a sitting volleyball game at the Rio 2016 Paralympics. CBC Sports has expanded coverage plans to include live streams of Canada's first two women's sitting volleyball matches from the Tokyo 2020 Paralympics. (Atsushi Tomura/Getty Images - image credit)

CBC Sports is extending coverage plans at the Paralympics to include live streams of the first two Canadian women's sitting volleyball games in coordination with the International Paralympic Committee, Olympic Broadcasting Services and Canadian Paralympic Consortium.

Canada opens the tournament Friday in Tokyo at 6:30 p.m. local time against Brazil (5:30 a.m. ET in Canada).

All of Canada's games will now be available for audiences across the country to watch live on cbc.ca/tokyo2020.

"To be able to tell my family back home that they can watch me play and compete in my second Paralympics as team captain is unreal. Absolutely unreal," Danielle Eliis told CBC Sports.

"I'm so excited to be here and I really want to share this sport with the world."

Devin Heroux/CBC Sports
Devin Heroux/CBC Sports

Ellis, from White Rock, B.C., was part of the team that finished seventh in Rio. Canada is ranked fifth in the world entering the Tokyo Paralympics.

The team earned its ticket to the Games at the final qualification tournament on home soil in Halifax in February 2020. It's been a long wait with the year delay but the 11-member team is ready to deliver.

"We're feeling excited. The team is feeling good. We start every day with gratitude and we're ready," Ellis, who is the captain, said.

"It was a long 16 months away from competition. We've worked really hard. Have done a lot of zoom meetings as a team. We're all over the country. So it wasn't easy to get together and train."

Awareness 'means everything'

Heidi Peters, from Neerlandia, Alta., was also part of the Rio team. The team's preliminary games were not broadcast during those Paralympics.

"It's so important that people see our sport. We know how important it is," she told CBC Sports.

"It means everything. It means people are hearing us and want to see us. I hope that's true of all para sports across the board. It's really important to push what the Paralympics are supposed to be and that's a parallel to the Olympics. We work just as hard. It's a dream come true. It's magic. And we just want people to see that."

Julie Kozun, from Melfort, Sask., is making her Paralympic debut — bright-eyed with the prospect of wearing the maple leaf on this grand athletic stage and thrilled her family, friends and home province will get to see every game.

"I have a whole community at home behind me. Melfort. It's known that I'm here," Kozun said.

"I think Saskatchewan will be very happy. I have a really big family so there are a lot of people who want to watch. They've been following this team since I joined it. More people need to know about this. It needs to be shown and known that it's out there. This can help people."

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