Advertisement

All the Best Looks From Paris Fashion Week Fall/Winter 2024

louis vuitton  runway paris fashion week womenswear fallwinter 2024 2025
All the Best Looks From Paris Fashion Week FW24Yanshan Zhang - Getty Images

Louis Vuitton

Au revoir, fashion month! Louis Vuitton was back to the closing spot on the schedule this season for a celebration of creative director Nicolas Ghesquière’s 10-year anniversary at the helm of the brand. It was a nostalgic show, with cheeky callouts to many of his previous collections, plus lots of new ideas to bring fashion ever forward. Read my full review here.—Kevin LeBlanc, fashion associate

louis vuitton fall winter 2024
Giovanni Giannoni

Louis Vuitton

louis vuitton fall winter 2024
Giovanni Giannoni

Louis Vuitton

a woman walking down a runway
Giovanni Giannoni

Miu Miu

Are skinny jeans...back? That was one of the questions posed by Miuccia Prada in her latest showing for Miu Miu. This season, in lieu of creating viral trends (hello, micro miniskirt), the consummate creative honed in on the essence of the brand with maximalist looks made to stand out. Read our full review here.—Claire Stern, digital director

miu miu fall winter 2024 collection
Courtesy of Miu Miu

Miu Miu

miu miu fall winter 2024 collection
Courtesy of Miu Miu

Miu Miu

miu miu fall winter 2024 collection
Courtesy of Miu Miu

Chanel

Everything in Chanel’s fall/winter 2024 collection was wearable, and when you consider newsboy caps and wide-brimmed hats being integrated into your day-to-day wardrobe, that’s saying quiet a lot. The presentation kicked off with an Inez and Vinoodh-directed short film starring house ambassadors Penélope Cruz and Brad Pitt, set against a soundtrack entirely by Air, and featured Gigi Hadid, Quannah Chasinghorse, and model-on-the-rise Angelina Kendall on the runway, with Blackpink’s Jennie and Naomi Campbell holding court in the front row. Masculine-inspired shearling coats commingled with easy cardigan sets and denim to make welcome additions to any closet. Read our full review here.—Claire Stern, digital director

chanel fall winter 2024 collection
Giovanni Giannoni

Chanel

chanel fall winter 2024 collection
Giovanni Giannoni

Chanel

chanel fall winter 2024 collection
Giovanni Giannoni

Coperni

All eyes might’ve been on Coperni’s latest viral moment (in case you missed it, its new swipe bag is made of 99 percent air and 1 percent glass), but the collection itself was an exploration that felt out of this world. It was space-age meets modern-day, akin to a UFO landing on earth, with metallic jackets, foil dresses, and rocket-ship button-embellishments. Not immune to the trends of this planet, legs were all the rage, with ultra-shiny, almost iridescent tights worn under what can only be described as workwear bodysuits: a trench coat, a leather bomber, and an astronaut’s suit made skimpy. Other pieces in the collection might not have been as obviously trendy, but they were just as interesting. Faux fur coats dipped in blue and green paint, slinky draped jersey dresses, transparent white paneled suits and gowns, and exquisitely patchworked deadstock leather suits gave the assortment a depth outside of the obvious theme, while still maintaining the show’s other-ness. These pieces definitely aren’t all air and no substance, but rather remain wearable and cool for the right customer.—Madison Rexroat, fashion & accessories assistant

coperni
Courtesy, Coperni

Coperni

coperni
Courtesy, Coperni

Coperni

coperni
Courtesy, Coperni

Sacai

Is it a jacket? Is it a dress? Who cares! Chitose Abe has been splicing and dicing the daily wardrobe for years at Sacai, and this collection fused more pieces together than you can count on one hand. A flight jacket front reveals a suit jacket back, with quilted sleeves on the side. It’s as if the woman got dressed in the dark, threw on what her hands felt, and ended up in three different fabrics. With knee-highs elongating the silhouette, you almost don’t need pants. And with the hybrid coat jacket-dresses, you only need to find one piece in your wardrobe when getting dressed. That’s the Sacai way, after all.—Kevin LeBlanc, fashion associate

a person wearing a black and white outfit with a white scarf
HIROKAZU OHARA

Sacai

a man in a uniform
HIROKAZU OHARA

Sacai

a person wearing a green coat
HIROKAZU OHARA

Marine Serre

To address the elephant in the room, no, that wasn’t in fact Kate Mossjust a mind-bending lookalike. But, yes, that was the real Winnie Harlow you saw on the catwalk for Marine Serre’s newest collection. Prepare for a resurgence of the designer’s crescent moon print as it’s back in a variety of new interpretations, including on bags, a leather jacket, and even a baby carrier. Apart from that motif, Serre had fun playing with patchwork and prints. Python alternated with laces, and one hooded dress was constructed out of stitched together sweatsuits. Some looks had a nostalgic, Elle Woods-esque vibe to them, like fur-trimmed tops and a mini tube dress with a bubble skirt. The few non-patterned looks had just as much of an impact, such as a navy midi skirt suit. The details—like funky charm jewelry and one model pushing a grocery cart—really livened up the show, as did the reusable grocery bags as show invites.—Meg Donohue, associate fashion commerce editor

marine serre rtw fall 2024 runway
WWD - Getty Images

Marine Serre

marine serre rtw fall 2024 runway
WWD - Getty Images

Marine Serre

marine serre rtw fall 2024 runway
WWD - Getty Images

Stella McCartney

Sustainability was at the root of Stella McCartney’s fall/winter 2024 collection, which the brand called “a message from Mother Earth.” Opening with an eco-manifesto read by Olivia Coleman and Helen Mirren, McCartney’s activism is far from just talk. What followed was a parade of the latest and greatest in sustainable materials: regenerative wool twill, responsibly sourced wool, UPPEAL™ (made of apples), YATAY B (made of agricultural waste), vegan leather, forest-friendly viscose, lead-free crystal rivets and metallic snaps, recyclable hammered aluminum sequins, regenerative cashmere, regenerative cotton, repurposed deadstock chains, and finally, Airlite, “a pioneering environmentally friendly technology that actively purifies the air.” The show notes practically read like a list of ingredients; in all, 90 percent of the ready-to-wear in the collection is made of responsible materials, and entirely free of leather, feathers, fur, and exotic skins. In a very fur- and leather-heavy season (with its share of animal rights runway protesters), it actually stands as incredible proof that if a brand wanted to, they wouldand absolutely could. And without sacrificing an ounce of style either.—Rosie Jarman, market editor

a person wearing a brown dress and sunglasses
Courtesy of Stella McCartney

Stella McCartney

a person walking on a runway
Courtesy of Stella McCartney

Stella McCartney

a person wearing a fur coat
Courtesy of Stella McCartney

Mugler

Mugler is known for creating a spectacle, for being out-of-the-box, futuristic, and hot. You can always expect to be surprised. It’s remarkable, then, that Casey Cadwallader still managed to put on a show that enthralled its audience. As drones flew overhead in a high school gymnasium, a cast of all-stars models like Eva Herzigova, Irina Shayk, and Precious Lee debuted the designer’s fall/winter 2024 collection. Inspired by Thierry Mugler’s archives, the garments stayed true to the label with abstract and asymmetrical silhouettes, transparent fabrics, and an abundance of exposed nipples. Red tinsel and strips of leather fringe made the classic styles feel fresh, but the most novel was the introduction of prints. Cadwallader, who works mostly with solid black, collaborated with painter Ambera Wellmann to create patterned velvets and denims for fall that feel impossibly fresh.—Meg Donohue, associate fashion commerce editor

mugler runway paris fashion week womenswear fallwinter 2024 2025
Marc Piasecki - Getty Images

Mugler

mugler runway paris fashion week womenswear fallwinter 2024 2025
Pascal Le Segretain - Getty Images

Mugler

mugler runway paris fashion week womenswear fallwinter 2024 2025
Taylor Hill - Getty Images

Johanna Ortiz

Colombian-born designer Johanna Ortiz gave Paris Fashion Week attendees a welcome respite from the schedule with a salon-style presentation at the Collège des Bernardins. Models walked throughout the space in a repeated loop as guests enjoyed espresso martinis made with rum. Inspired by the late 1800s Orientalist paintings, the fall/winter 2024 collection featured earth tones, the Amapola flower, and rich textures, with a touch of metallic mixed in for good measure. Leather bags (pictured here) served as a nod to the Colombian Arhuaco Community.—Claire Stern, digital director

johanna ortiz fall winter 2024 collection
Miguel Peña

Johanna Ortiz

johanna ortiz fall winter 2024 collection
Miguel Peña

Johanna Ortiz

johanna ortiz fall winter 2024 collection
Miguel Peña

Valentino

The reign of Pink PP has officially come to an end. In a dramatic shift from Pierpaolo Piccioli’s signature shocking pink hue, Valentino now presents “Le Noir.” The entirely black collection focuses on texture, silhouette, and delicately crafted embellishment and embroidery (and is arguably more wearable.) Piccioli, the undisputed master of color, is certainly not using black as a blank slate. Rather, as the brand’s show notes state, “Black is seen as a vessel of light, an entire spectrum of shades within one.” From supple polished leathers to diaphanous transparent dresses, tailored wool to joyful fringe, the collection manages to imagine a wardrobe for every occasion, completely uninhibited by the choice of a singular shade.—Rosie Jarman, market editor

a woman wearing a black coat
Courtesy of Valentino

Valentino

a woman wearing a black leather jacket and sunglasses
Courtesy of Valentino

Valentino

a woman wearing a black dress
Courtesy of Valentino

Duran Lantink

Plays on proportion and exaggeration, a now recognizable signature for Duran Lantink, were once again abundant in his fall/winter 2024 collection, dedicated to interpreting his artistic designs in the context of ski culture. Knit bodysuits, dresses, and sweater jackets were met with the designer’s typical puffed-up effect. Layers were cropped, but inflated, and skirts were ultra-mini but architectural. Not everything was an exaggerated silhouette, though. Lantink experimented with cut-outs and transparent paneling to create illusions of gravity-defying garments, while other pieces looked simply cozy, in an unexpected way. There were balaclavas and thigh-high sock boots, furry boots and vests, and Fair Isle knit patterns. Lantink’s arrival onto the sartorial scene has been an interesting one to watch with his unique design sensibility, a rarity among the copycat aesthetics running rampant. Stay tuned for more.—Madison Rexroat, fashion & accessories assistant

duran lantink
@Luca Tombolini

Duran Lantink

duran lantink
@Luca Tombolini

Duran Lantink

duran lantink
@Luca Tombolini

Balenciaga

Demna is not interested in resolved, easily translatable fashion. The Balenciaga designer’s latest show featured massive screens playing AI-generated content of nature, city life, ending in grey TV static. His obsession with the real and fake, the human and artificial, was on display in the tenuous, haphazard nature of the finale looks, juxtaposed alongside his de rigeuer streetwear and crinkled couture. Read my full review here.—Kevin LeBlanc, fashion associate

a person walking on a runway
Courtesy of Balenciaga

Balenciaga

balenciaga
Courtesy of Balenciaga

Balenciaga

a person in a dress
Courtesy of Balenciaga

McQueen

Perhaps the most anticipated debut collection of the season, not to mention in recent years, was Seán McGirr’s McQueen (they dropped the Alexander, by the way). In a derelict warehouse, attendees took in his youthful, irreverent take on London’s East End characters of the night. Leather coats were paired with pointed-toe Oxford shoes and even pointier hats for a Slenderman look, and knitwear from the Loewe cutting floor cocooned model’s necks to the point of immobility. There was promise in some of the men’s pieces, like a studded leather jacket, and the smashed-car window dresses, but overall, what was sorely missing was the brand’s knife-sharp suiting, love for women, and subversion and immolation of the everyday into a concise worldview. Let’s hope next season proves more focused. Read our full review here.—Kevin LeBlanc, fashion associate

a woman walking on a runway
INDIGITAL.TV

McQueen

a man walking on a runway
INDIGITAL.TV

McQueen

a person walking down a sidewalk
INDIGITAL.TV

Ann Demeulemeester

In his second collection since being appointed creative director for Ann Demeulemeester, Stefano Gallici is finding his vision for the brand. Dark and seductive, rock and roll and witchy, the collection is everything a winter line for the brand should be. Models donned silky neglige short sets under floor-length leather coats with shearling trims; distressed cropped sweaters were styled over transparent gowns and pleated maxi skirts. The boots? Moto. The pants? Baggy. The hair? Tousled. This is the woman you want to be—effortlessly cool, unaffected, and edgy with an IDGAF attitude—but, more often than not, we’re simply in awe of. At least with a showing like this, we have the beginnings of a blueprint.—Madison Rexroat, fashion & accessories assistant

model on the catwalk at the ann demeulemeester fashion show in paris, fall winter 2024 ready to wear fashion weekphoto by valerio mezzanotti
Valerio Mezzanotti

Ann Demeulemeester

model on the catwalk at the ann demeulemeester fashion show in paris, fall winter 2024 ready to wear fashion weekphoto by valerio mezzanotti
Valerio Mezzanotti

Ann Demeulemeester

ann demeulemeester
Valerio Mezzanotti

Hermès

Hermès went for a ride this season, bolstering its equestrian roots with a biker edge. It was both tough and ever so chic: motorcycle motifs like studs and boots were tempered by the transparent luxury of leather, tailoring, and finishes on offer by a brand like Hermès. In rich neutrals from brown to burgundy to buttery yellow, with just a splash of red, it makes the continued case for quiet luxury even as it applies to an adventurous backstory like this imagined motorcycle chick. The ultimate showstopper, however, had to be the indoor rain encasing the runway. An Instagrammable hit amongst attendees, and the perfect setting for a dramatic, atmospheric collection, even as it poured outside the venue.—Rosie Jarman, market editor

a man wearing a garment
Photo: Filippo Fior / Gorunway.com

Hermès

a man wearing a coat and boots
Photo: Filippo Fior / Gorunway.com

Hermès

a person wearing a leather jacket and boots
Photo: Filippo Fior / Gorunway.com

Andreas Kronthaler for Vivienne Westwood

As is standard for the house, the latest Andreas Kronthaler collection for Vivienne Westwood was chock-full of historical references made new. This time, costumes found in late Renaissance painter Giovanni Battista Moroni’s work was met with sports protection gear to create a juxtaposition that, in the world of AK for VW, somehow makes sense. Intentionally slashed fabrics created textural movement, while bold, oversized shoulders and embellished chest plates felt athletic...in a Westwood kind of way. Ruffled shoulders and capri-cropped pants with knee-high socks, along with multiple all-black looks, typical of Renaissance-era elegance, gave the collection the historical balance it sought out while adding the Westwood sensibility of grungy playfulness. As quoted by Henry James in the show notes, “A tradition is kept alive only by something being added to it.”—Madison Rexroat, fashion & accessories assistant

andreas kronthaler for vivienne westwood fall winter 2024
Ugo Camera

Andreas Kronthaler for Vivienne Westwood

andreas kronthaler for vivienne westwood fall winter 2024
Ugo Camera

Andreas Kronthaler for Vivienne Westwood

andreas kronthaler for vivienne westwood fall winter 2024
Ugo Camera

Carven

Louise Trotter’s second collection at Carven was the picture of a thoroughly modern woman: sculptural yet wearable, with delightfully unexpected details from top to bottom. Satin boots, furry flats, and puffy slingbacks paired fantastically with ready-to-wear that felt like modern artall about shape, form, and texture as it would apply to daily staples like coats, dresses, and trousers. It’s a very promising second chapter in the rebirth of Carven, honoring the history of the house while giving fans of the brand lots to love and newcomers a ton to look forward to.—Rosie Jarman, market editor

a woman wearing a tan jacket
Courtesy of Carven

Carven

a man wearing a trench coat
Courtesy of Carven

Carven

a woman in a black dress
Courtesy of Carven

Junya Watanabe

Math class? At fashion week? Junya Watanabe’s fun-loving collection of geometric shapes was a study in form, as the designer riffed off constricting triangles and circles on molded biker jackets, belted leather skirts, and tented coats. His singular view drew everything together, and with a metal flair on some badass neckpieces over simple wool overcoats, drove home the rough glamour and impractical couture he’s known for.—Kevin LeBlanc, fashion associate

junya watanabe rtw fall 2024 runway
WWD - Getty Images

Junya Watanabe

junya watanabe rtw fall 2024 runway
WWD - Getty Images

Junya Watanabe

junya watanabe rtw fall 2024 runway
WWD - Getty Images

Victoria Beckham

It’s always exciting to see Victoria Beckham give her sophisticated spin to current trends and fit them into a wearable everyday wardrobeand on crutches, no less. This time, it’s trompe-l’oeils and proportion play that are the clear motifs of the season. Ultra- high collars and waistlines met with flattened sweaters blazers, all in autumnal dark primary tones, with the exception of a few buttery yellow and pale pink garments. As this is no longer Beckham’s first Paris Fashion Week rodeo, she seems to be experimenting more with cheeky design, perhaps venturing into a space popularized by JW Anderson. Incorporating sculpture into clothing might be a work in progress here, but the chin-grazing and sometimes even face-blocking collars were particularly sublime, along with Beckham’s penchant for making practical clothes covetable and alluring.—Madison Rexroat, fashion & accessories assistant

victoria beckham fall winter 2024
Courtesy, Victoria Beckham

Victoria Beckham

victoria beckham fall winter 2024
Courtesy, Victoria Beckham

Victoria Beckham

victoria beckham fall winter 2024
Courtesy, Victoria Beckham

Nina Ricci

Touches of flamboyance and heavy sweeps of nostalgia were the vibes for Harris Reed’s third season at Nina Ricci. Oversized bow structures, twinset suits, polka dots, and pops of color gave the collection a jolt of femininity, while pinstripe suits and croc-embossed leather added edginess, a balance that Reed strives to make effortless in a customer’s wardrobe. While decades past might’ve been the inspiration, particularly the 1960s, a heyday for the brand, lace catsuits, transparent blouses, and hot pants (a silhouette we can’t seem to escape) made the collection feel firmly grounded in 2024. There was nothing “quiet” about the aesthetics, nor the intentions. The clothes themselves had obvious glamour, but it’s the wearer that will—and should—bring that glamour to life.—Madison Rexroat, fashion & accessories assistant

nina ricci fall winter 2024
Courtesy, Nina Ricci

Nina Ricci

nina ricci fall winter 2024
Courtesy, Nina Ricci

Nina Ricci

nina ricci fall winter 2024
Courtesy, Nina Ricci

Giambattista Valli

Ever-feminine and ever-poised, Giambattista Valli’s fall/winter 2024 showing was a study in elegance. Lee Radziwill acted as muse to the designer this season (well-timed for fans of FX’s Feud: Capote vs. The Swans, for whom these society ladies are no doubt top of mind at the moment). Her influence shined through in the careful ’60s tailoring of coats and minidresses, with bohemian florals and the sweetest of pinks popping throughout. Valli signatures are perfectly matched with Radziwill’s style codes; we really couldn’t ask for a better pairing.—Rosie Jarman, market editor

a person wearing a white coat
Photo: Daniele Oberrauch / Gorunway.com

Giambattista Valli

a person wearing a dress
Photo: Daniele Oberrauch / Gorunway.com

Giambattista Valli

a person wearing a dress and sunglasses
Photo: Daniele Oberrauch / Gorunway.com

Loewe

Jonathan Anderson’s latest for Loewe was concise, exploratory, and based itself on British aristocracy infused with inspiration from American painter Albert York’s homely paintings of quotidian moments. The result was highly wearable (for some), rife with desirable accessories, heavily beaded dresses, plus vegetable prints and sweeping pants. Read my full review here.—Kevin LeBlanc, fashion associate

a woman wearing a dress
Photo: Daniele Oberrauch / Gorunway.com

Loewe

a person wearing a dress
Photo: Daniele Oberrauch / Gorunway.com

Loewe

a man in a suit and tie
Photo: Daniele Oberrauch / Gorunway.com

Isabel Marant

Infused with wanderlust and a rough-and-tumble energy, Isabel Marant headed west for fall/winter 2024. What Marant does so well is, ultimately, storytelling: Each piece was immediately recognizable for belonging to the brand, but always creating new adventures for the Marant woman. Signature silhouettes like slouchy boots and cocoon jackets were done up in leathers and suedes, trimmed in brilliant fringe and heavy hardware. The olive palette was occasionally accentuated by shocks of red and an array of animal prints, playing with texture, sheen and shine. Slightly ’80s in styling and spirit, it presented us with a vision of a woman on the open road who I just know owns a mean cassette collection.Rosie Jarman, market editor

a man wearing a brown jacket
Photo: Filippo Fior / Gorunway.com

Isabel Marant

a person wearing a leather jacket
Photo: Filippo Fior / Gorunway.com

Isabel Marant

a person wearing a leather jacket
Photo: Filippo Fior / Gorunway.com

Schiaparelli

It’s hard to discuss anything on this runway other than the braided neckties that looked to be made of hair, but Schiaparelli’s craftsmanship can’t be denied. From denim sets to puffer coats, everything creative director Daniel Roseberry touches turns to gold, and for some ensembles, I mean that literally. He struck a fine mix of both flawless tailoring and extremely oversized suiting offset by garments made in a giant croc pattern. But as always, the devil is in the details. For this showing, that included bags with faces, belt buckles used as wrist cuffs, and the recirculation of a few of Elsa Schiaparelli’s favorite touches: keyholes and shells.—Meg Donohue, associate fashion commerce editor

schiaparelli rtw fall 2024 runway
WWD - Getty Images

Schiaparelli

schiaparelli rtw fall 2024 runway
WWD - Getty Images

Schiaparelli

schiaparelli runway paris fashion week womenswear fallwinter 2024 2025
Estrop - Getty Images

Rabanne

In a somewhat bold departure from the brand’s recent show aestheticsthink: paillettes, modernism, and lots of metallicsthe Rabanne fall/winter 2024 collection was a cacophony of prints, layering, and fringe. While other brands are indeed leaning back towards ’70s-inspired, 2010s-esque boho-chic, Rabanne makes a case for bohemian maximalism, with layers on top of layers (on top of more layers and more layers) and clashing prints of plaids, florals, and chevron (and polka dots, and animal prints, and on and on and on). It’s a delightful disruption, though not totally unexpected given the palpable shift toward the free-spirited aesthetic. Rabanne’s take is decidedly grungier, and yet very on-brand. Perhaps Julien Dossena was even a bit ahead of the curve, since we started seeing the layered styling and mixed prints in the brand’s 2019 collections and the quilted chevron pullover style as far back as 2015. Whether styled like in the show or as individual pieces, this latest collection will certainly make for bold fall looks and a welcome return to the anti-matchy-matchy, imperfectly perfect aesthetic.—Madison Rexroat, fashion & accessories assistant

rabanne
YANNIS VLAMOS

Rabanne

rabanne
YANNIS VLAMOS

Rabanne

rabanne
YANNIS VLAMOS

Givenchy

What is womanhood if not a precarious balancing act? Gentle yet strong, practical but playful, this dynamic dichotomy has been central to the house since its origins. Looking back to the founder’s muses, the fall/winter 2024 collection can be summed up as “instinctive elegance,” as written in the show notes. Dramatic necklines and bustle dresses in black, navy, and red set the Givenchy woman squarely in Paris, as did oversized knits and voluminous fur and wool fringe. The monogrammed tailoring from the recent menswear showing carried over for the ladies, offering a subtle cohesion. The house’s classic bag styles were reimagined for the season, and the famed Shark Lock Boots made their triumphant over-the-knee debut.—Meg Donohue, associate fashion commerce editor

a person wearing a dress
photo: Alessandro Lucioni / Gorunway.com

Givenchy

a woman wearing a dress
photo: Alessandro Lucioni / Gorunway.com

Givenchy

a man wearing a fur coat
photo: Alessandro Lucioni / Gorunway.com

Chloé

One of the most anticipated shows of the week was Chemena Kamali’s debut collection as creative director of Chloé. Of course, her ties to the label run deep: She’s worked for the brand three separate times, and her deep understanding of the Chloé woman, and customer, was on full display today in her winning debut. transparent floral blouses paired with slouchy thigh-highs and massive Chloé gold belts effused boho-chic cool, patent leather capes in muted colors had epaulet shoulders that demanded space, and killer outerwear included sweeping plaid coats. There was such an innate ease to it all, including the flouncy finale dresses in pastels and rich mauves, nothing uncomfortable, nothing too severe, everything totally Chloé. BTW: the wooden clog is so back. Read our full review here.—Kevin LeBlanc, fashion associate

a person wearing a blue dress
photo: Carlo Scarpato / Gorunway.com

Chloé

a woman walking on a runway
photo: Carlo Scarpato / Gorunway.com

Chloé

a person wearing a camouflage jacket and sunglasses
photo: Carlo Scarpato / Gorunway.com

Rick Owens

Out-of-this world knitwear and continued innovation in footwear were the defining motifs of Rick Owens’ fall/winter 2024 showing. Inspired by the settings in space fantasy novels that Owens dreamed of escaping to during his childhood, the collection was an interpretation of what life could be like in a different world, or a different planet. Head-to-toe knitwear, from balaclavas and catsuits to gowns and floor-dusting coats, gave the clothes a cozy feel, while puffer jackets and viral puff boots stayed true to the brand’s unique aesthetic. What might appear outlandish on earth might be considered leisurewear elsewhere, a balance Owens has always struck. Perhaps no one was better equipped to model the pieces than Gena Marvin, the trans Russian performance artist known for fearless, otherworldly looks in seemingly mundane settings. While black, brown, and olive neutrals were ever-present, mint greens were teamed with deep burgundy, while canary yellow accented bubblegum-pink silhouettes. The show ended with a run of sculptural sequined garments in black, white, brown, and olive green. In this vibe of space-age sci-fi fantasy, could they be cages, tree roots, or wires? In Owens’ world, anything goes.—Madison Rexroat, fashion & accessories assistant

rick owens
OWENSCORP

Rick Owens

rick owens
OWENSCORP

Rick Owens

rick owens
OWENSCORP

Balmain

Last season, creative director Olivier Rousteing built a rose-themed collection in honor of the brand’s namesake founder. This season, he went back to his own roots, drawing inspiration from his upbringing in Bordeaux. Fruits were the through line, with an emphasis on grapes in celebration of his hometown’s vineyards, and the occasional sculptural shell spiral embellishment was meant to evoke escargot. Edible components aside, the assortment saw dramatically broad shoulders and snatched waistlines in palettes of black, khaki, sage green, and leather. Bodices fanned upwards, platform heels were sky-high, and don’t forget about the cherry-red market tote bags. In another ode to the house, Rousteing brought back the iconic Vichy print on an enlarged scale.—Meg Donohue, associate fashion commerce editor

a person wearing a white shirt and black pants
Courtesy of Balmain

Balmain

a man wearing a military uniform
Courtesy of Balmain

Balmain

a person wearing a dress
Courtesy of Balmain

Acne Studios

At Acne Studios, guests in the middle of the runway sat on massive lumps of reworked tires that served as chairs. The rough-and-ready aesthetic translated into the severe show, which featured oversized fur coats, sleek and fitted leather mini and maxi dresses, and molded leather skirts, plus denim that riffed on the dirty denim Kylie Jenner donned for the brand. This aesthetic was countered by minidresses in mixed patterns and light knits and henleys. It was a somewhat anonymous, lacking identity, but no doubt will do well in stores and look great on friends of the brand (we’re looking at you, Emma Chamberlain!).—Kevin LeBlanc, fashion associate

a person wearing a black suit
Photo: Isidore Montag / Gorunway.com

Acne Studios

a person wearing a garment
Photo: Isidore Montag / Gorunway.com

Acne Studios

a person wearing a black fur coat
Photo: Isidore Montag / Gorunway.com

Meryll Rogge

Belgium-based brand Meryll Rogge celebrated four years in the biz with a runway show located in a Marais school. Models strutted through the school gym (and basement) in Rogge’s signature vintage-infused ready-to-wear. This season, chintzy florals splattered silk mini dresses and blouses, luxe sweats paired with roomy leather jackets, and Savile Row-level tailored vests and coats had exquisite form, with apron-style buttons running down the back. I'm adding this shimmering grandma cardigan to my shopping list.—Kevin LeBlanc, fashion associate

a person walking down a runway
ALESSANDRO GAROFALO

Meryll Rogge

a person walking down a runway
ALESSANDRO GAROFALO

Meryll Rogge

a man in a robe
ALESSANDRO GAROFALO

Casablanca

Casablanca’s fall/winter 2024 show was a clean slateliterallyfor a brand built on rainbow-bright tropical psychedelia. The show opened with a series of all-white looks, letting the focus fall on the form and fit of slinky dresses, draped suiting, and classic coats. When its signature ombrés were introduced, they came in monochromatic teal, while primary colors acted as teeny accents or technicolor takes on Grecian motifs. All in all, the Casablanca DNA was certainly there: an old-money-gone-new take on the après-ski vibe, and plenty of covetable collabs for the fans.—Rosie Jarman, market editor

Umberto Fratini / Gorunway.com

Casablanca

Umberto Fratini / Gorunway.com

Casablanca

Umberto Fratini / Gorunway.com

Dries Van Noten

If modern art had a fashion equivalent, it would be Dries Van Noten’s fall/winter 2024 runway. A mix of watercolor pastels, saturated brights, and autumnal tones, with artistic prints and bold textures mixed in, (most of) the clothes were incredibly wearable. So wearable, in fact, that the collection jumpstarted a conversation in the fashion community on elevated sweatpants (you read that right). Though if anyone can actually elevate sweatpants, it’s Dries. Oversized turtlenecks and wide-leg denim were met with splashes of unexpected patching, twisted zip hoodies, backwards button-down shirts, and sleeved scarf vests. Yes, pieces are wearable, but your favorites will say a lot about you, as well as answer questions like, are you a realist or a surrealist? The accessories also deserve some commotion: furry clutches, puffy medicine bags, and fuzzy metallic heels in the brand’s classic rounded square-toe silhouette tied the assortment, full of quiet and loud statement makers, together.—Madison Rexroat, fashion & accessories assistant

dries van noten
Imaxtree

Dries Van Noten

dries van noten
Imaxtree

Dries Van Noten

dries van noten
Imaxtree

Undercover

Luxury was anything but quiet at Undercover this season. Instead, it was all about the remix, cheekily merging our everyday layers into singular garments. Suiting, blue jeans, sweatsuits, knitwear, anoraks, and rain coats met pops of metallic tinsel and fuzzy furs in a method the brand refers to as “adhesion.” Styled with embroidered organza and “grocery bags” brimming with fruits and flowers, the collection raised the question: What if you had a little more fun on your bodega run?—Rosie Jarman, market editor

a person wearing a garment
Valerio Mezzanotti

Undercover

a person wearing a white dress
Valerio Mezzanotti

Undercover

a person in a trench coat
Valerio Mezzanotti

Courrèges

Nicolas Di Felice of Courrèges has one of the most singular points of view in fashion today, embracing the rich history of the brand he now helms while threading the needle towards the future. This was evident at their latest show in a stark white box, where models walked around with hands tucked into pockets right in front of their panty lines. Severe necklines covered mouths, while crafty illusion panels brought others down to the nipple. Embellishments were minimal, with transparent dresses and tops finely feathered and plush furs shrouding over. It is a tough version of femininity, but one that is damn sure of what it is, a refreshing and cohesive perspective that is only getting better with each season.—Kevin LeBlanc, fashion associate

courreges fall winter 2024
Courtesy of COURREGES

Courrèges

courreges fall winter 2024
Courtesy of COURREGES

Courrèges

a person wearing a trench coat and sunglasses
Courtesy of COURREGES

Saint Laurent

The humble tight was front and center at Saint Laurent, where hosiery fabric was used to craft the majority of the barely-there looks that walked on the runway. With the signature Opium fragrance pumping through the curtain-lined showspace under the Eiffel Tower, models whose hip bones jutted out of their transparent skirts circled the room in dusty tones of beige, green, red, and blue, in mostly the same silhouette. Where the transparent was not, there were great suits and jackets that we predict will actually sell. Read my full review here.—Kevin LeBlanc, fashion associate

saint laurent winter 2024
Alessandro Lucioni

Saint Laurent

saint laurent winter 2024
Alessandro Lucioni

Saint Laurent

saint laurent winter 2024
Alessandro Lucioni

Ester Manas

After a hiatus from the runway, Ester Manas returned in fine form on Tuesday evening with a runway that expanded on her worldview that is ingeniously inclusive (no tokenism here.) Her usual scrunched dresses were present, plus some great outerwear pieces in leather and assorted fabrics. She showed similar looks on different body types so everyone could see themselves reflected, a sadly rare occurance in fashion today. A real hit was the yellow long-sleeve dress with blue fringe hem, sure to fly off the racks come fall.—Kevin LeBlanc, fashion associate

ester manasautumn winter 2024paris, france
Courtesy of Ester Manas

Ester Manas

ester manasautumn winter 2024paris, france
Courtesy of Ester Manas

Ester Manas

ester manasautumn winter 2024paris, france
Courtesy of Ester Manas

Dior

Dior’s runway show was a throwback to the ’60s, when the diffusion line Miss Dior was founded. The collection embraced the ease of ready-to-wear back then, with A-line skirt suits, trenches, relaxed suiting, plus some show-stopping finale dresses that took the best of the 1920s, 1960s, and today to create spectacular pieces that don’t sacrifice comfort. Read my full review here.—Kevin LeBlanc, fashion associate

dior fall winter 2024 runway
Courtesy of Dior

Dior

a man wearing a white suit
Courtesy of Dior

Dior

a person in a uniform
Courtesy of Dior

Peter Do

On a brisk Tuesday morning, Peter Do opted out of a runway show in exchange for an intimate presentation. The concise 20 looks were inspired by his late grandmother, which resulted in sensuous body-con printed dresses, voluminous suiting in tan, gray, and black, plus some fabulous transparent maxi skirts layered upon pants and short skirts. The vision was clearer than it has been in a few seasons, and ultimately felt more approachable and easily translatable to a woman’s wardrobe than in seasons past.—Kevin LeBlanc, fashion associate

a person wearing a white shirt and black pants
Courtesy of Peter Do

Peter Do

a man wearing a brown suit
Courtesy of Peter Do

Peter Do

peter do fall 2024
Courtesy of Peter Do

Vaquera

This season, Vaquera was all about the money...literally. The brand’s show winked at our late-stage capitalist obsession with money. We all wish we could print it, and in this collection, Vaquera literally did, with cummerbunds, scarves, and shirts all printed in faux Vaquera-branded currency. Elsewhere, the duo behind the cult label honed in on their oversized denim offerings with skirts and pants, plus a killer Chanel-esque jacket and skirt in brown leather. The ruffled flower tops that are also a signature found their way onto black dresses and money-printed blouses. The bridal look felt part Gaultier, part Westwood, yet somehow 100-percent Vaquera, a rare feat these days. Almost as rare as printing money in fashion.—Kevin LeBlanc, fashion associate

a person wearing a garment
natalie Ivanova

Vaquera

a woman wearing a skirt
natalie Ivanova

Vaquera

a person wearing a coat and hat
natalie Ivanova

CFCL

For the first time since joining the Paris Fashion Week schedule, CFCL hosted a runway show to demonstrate its powerful take on knit dressing. The whole wardrobe was rounded out this season, with an emphasis on easy, breezy spun wools in cute transparent separates, striped bomber jackets, and sequined dresses with contrasting paillettes. Bonus: each piece of clothing was made with zero cutting, minimizing waste. After all, CFCL is a certified B-Corp apparel company in Japan, a powerful statement for the industry to take note of. It shouldn’t cost the planet its life to look good, and this runway is proof that it doesn’t have to.—Kevin LeBlanc, fashion associate

a person walking down a runway
Koji HIRANO

CFCL

cfcl fw24
Koji HIRANO

CFCL

a person wearing a dress
Koji HIRANO

You Might Also Like