People are queuing up for two hours to spend one minute in this room

Francesca SpecterYahoo Style UK deputy editor
A visitor stands inside Japanese artist, Yayoi Kusama mirrored 'Infinity Room-Gleaming Lights of Souls' room during a media preview at National Gallery Singapore on June 6, 2017 in Singapore. [Photo: Getty]
A visitor stands inside Japanese artist, Yayoi Kusama mirrored 'Infinity Room-Gleaming Lights of Souls' room during a media preview at National Gallery Singapore on June 6, 2017 in Singapore. [Photo: Getty]

People are queuing up for up to two hours to spend just a minute in an art installation room.

We’ve all heard of seven minutes in heaven, but one 90-year-old Japanese artist promises New York’s art fans a 60 second experience worth queuing up for hours for.

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Yayoi Kusama’s infinity mirror room is the piece de resistance in her “Every Day I Pray For Love” exhibition which is at the David Zwirner gallery.

She has previously done such installations before, including for her “Life is the Heart of the Rainbow” exhibition in Singapore in 2017, and has become known for the popular (and highly-Instagrammable) installations.

READ MORE: Artist swaps gender roles in sexist vintage ads

A video shared by Bloomberg’s TicToc platform portrays the incredible experience, together with the exhibition’s other offerings, which include a floor installation made up of reflective pieces.

Despite the one minute limit, most visitors who have visited the room are declaring on Twitter it is “worth the wait”.

Others offer a handy framework to dividing up your time in the room: 50 seconds to experience it and 10 seconds to take pictures.

But, unsurprisingly, some are saying they wished they had more time in the room.

It’s not the only popular tourist attraction which imposes a time limit, however. The Chicago Skydeck imposes a time limit of 60 to 90 seconds on guests visiting its popular Ledge experience.

The room has unsurprisingly proved a big hit on Instagram.

The Broad Museum, where the exhibition was previously housed, shared a proposal which took place in one of Kusama’s Infinity Mirrored Rooms in 2013.

Earlier this year, an Istanbul art installation featuring high heels marked the hundreds of women killed by their partners in domestic violence cases in Turkey last year.

Turkish artist Vahit Tuna has hung 440 pairs of high heels on a building in Istanbul, the country’s capital city, to highlight the national problem of domestic violence.

The open-air art installation is exhibited as part of Yanköşe, a not-for-profit arts platform started in 2017 by Kahve Dünyası, a Turkish coffee chain.

“We wanted everyone passing by the road to see [the work]. This is why we did not want to host the exhibition in a closed area,” artist Tuna told Turkish media, as reported by the Hurriyet Daily News.

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