Alex Jones Claims His Kanye West Interview Was a ‘Setup’

·5 min read
alex-jones-kanye-west.jpg alex-jones-kanye-west - Credit: Joe Buglewicz/Getty Images; MEGA/GC Images
alex-jones-kanye-west.jpg alex-jones-kanye-west - Credit: Joe Buglewicz/Getty Images; MEGA/GC Images

Alex Jones has a new conspiracy theory: That his infamous interview of Kanye West, where Ye declared his love for Hitler, was an elaborate “setup” — orchestrated by “eugenicist super Nazis” who control the “New World Order.”

Jones made the bizarre declaration during an InfoWars broadcast last week. Jones — a tireless conspiracy theorist who insists that freedom loving Americans are under assault — declared that Kanye West had been turned into a pawn by a tyrannical elite whose dark ambitions make “Hitler look like a lightweight.”

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Jones made the pivot to Kanye, by way of even-darker and dishonest vitriol against the Anti-Defamation League. Jones insisted that the New World Order crowd — whom he claims seek to impose “a biomedical, mad scientist, de-population tyranny” — had “hired leftist groups like the ADL to be their front,” lying that the anti-semitism watchdog is part of a “false flag” plot.

Jones warned his watchers: “We have to transcend that, and not become Kanye West — who I’m not attacking,” he insisted, “but obviously has been sucked into the paradigm.”  (A note to readers: It’s useless to fact check Jones, a demonstrated liar. He is quoted here because his hateful conspiracy theories are newsworthy, not because they are true.)

Jones elaborated, without evidence, that the New World Order cabal might have used the rapper’s “tax issues” to pressure Ye to “go around and try to set people up — like he did that day, sitting here in that chair next to me,” Jones said, snapping and pointing at where Ye had been seated when the rapper declared, “I like Hitler.”

Jones’ unhinged yarn appears to have been a pretext for the host to declare that he’s not, in fact, a hater. “I love everybody,” Jones insisted. “I love the Muslims. I love the Jews. I love the Christians … I love the agnostics and the atheist,” he said. “I really don’t want to see us all destroyed together,” Jones added, conspiratorially invoking the dark ambitions of the New World Order once again. “I really don’t want to see this planetary-collapse into hell world.”

Jones’ remarks sparked a sharp rebuttal, Saturday, from the white supremacist and Holocaust denier Nick Fuentes, who accompanied the rapper on Jones’ notorious Dec. 2022 broadcast, and was working for Ye at the time.  “Alex Jones wasn’t ‘set up,’’’ Fuentes insisted on Telegram — calling out Jones for a “flat-out lie.” The hate-monger Fuentes argued that the conspiratorial InfoWars host “knew full well what Ye’s views were before the show.”

“I know Alex doesn’t agree with us on the Jews or Hitler, which is… what it is.” Fuentes continued. “But he has been mischaracterizing that interview for the last 6 months, insinuating that we were there to sabotage his show, which is a malicious, ass-saving lie.”

Fuentes has been at the heart of a power struggle over Ye’s political future. The rapper and potential 2024 presidential candidate had been paying Fuentes as an adviser, from the coffers of his past run in 2020. But Ye recently re-hired the right wing troll Milo Yiannopoulos as his “political director,” which has put Fuentes on the outs (even as it has embroiled the rapper’s incipient 2024 campaign in scandal).

Fuentes leads a group of young, white supremacist followers known as the Groypers. And he alleges that Jones’ rhetoric was a form of “bad jacketing” — a psychological tactic used to sow distrust. “Understand that when Alex says that we ‘set him up’ or suggests that Ye became a fed, or that he’s secretly working with the ADL, this is extremely calculated,” Fuentes warned.

“Alex isn’t being ‘paranoid’ and it isn’t about a difference of opinion. He is mindfully and deliberately using a fed tactic to discredit our movement,” Fuentes insisted, before making an assertion rarely, if ever, made of Alex Jones:

“He knows exactly what he’s doing.”

InfoWars is Jones’ bizarre, far-right show dedicated to dark lunacy. Jones feeds his watchers paranoid delusions about shadowy forces that he declares are working against everyday Americans and their populist leaders.

Jones’ dark history is well known: He peddled the perverse, false notion that the Newtown school massacre was staged by crisis actors — a “wanton, malicious, and heinous” lie against the parents of the victims, a judge recently ruled, that will cost Jones up to $1.5 billion in damages.

Jones is still making hay off of fever-swamp fictions. His convoluted show last week was anchored on the grotesque falsehood that U.S. hospitals set up “secret kill floors to murder Covid patients” during the pandemic.

After Jones railed, too, against the annual meeting of the secretive, ultra-elite Bilderberg group in Portugal, Jones soon began spouting hateful nonsense about ADL, which he lied is part of a plot to “assassinate” populists, or resort to “putting us in slave labor camps.”

Jones then worked himself into a lather about the aims of the New World Order: “It is about human-animal cloning. It is about euthanasia,” he growled. The evil ambitions of this power-mad cabal, he declared, “makes Hitler look like a lightweight.”

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