49ers' Jaquiski Tartt rips ball from Seattle's DK Metcalf on amazing play

DK Metcalf is a big, strong dude. We know that from all the viral pictures of his physique before the Seattle Seahawks drafted him earlier this year.

That’s part of what made San Francisco 49ers defensive back Jaquiski Tartt’s big play on Monday night so great.

Metcalf was bulling forward for what looked like a possible touchdown when Tartt got a hold of the ball and wouldn’t let go. Initially Metcalf was ruled down at the 1-yard line, but replays showed a different story.

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Tartt was able to rip the ball out of Metcalf’s hands and fall on it for a fumble recovery. That likely cost the Seahawks at least a field goal, and probably a touchdown in the final minute of the first half. The 49ers went into halftime with a 10-7 lead. Seattle eventually won the game 27-24 in overtime.

Tartt was standing out of bounds when he first got his hands on the ball, but because Metcalf had possession, it didn’t matter that Tartt wasn’t in bounds. Tartt established himself in bounds before ripping the ball away.

Tartt’s play was an impressive display of hustle and determination. His strip was a bit reminiscent of Alabama safety George Teague’s famous Sugar Bowl play when he ran down Miami’s Horace Copeland and ripped the ball from his hands. You don’t see that too often in the NFL, or anywhere.

Give Tartt a lot of credit for not giving up on the play, and somehow getting the ball away from Metcalf.

Jaquiski Tartt (29) of the San Francisco 49ers strips the ball from DK Metcalf of the Seattle Seahawks. (Photo by Lachlan Cunningham/Getty Images)
Jaquiski Tartt (29) of the San Francisco 49ers strips the ball from DK Metcalf of the Seattle Seahawks. (Photo by Lachlan Cunningham/Getty Images)

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Frank Schwab is a writer for Yahoo Sports. Have a tip? Email him at shutdown.corner@yahoo.com or follow him on Twitter! Follow @YahooSchwab

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