Ryan Lambert

  • Like
  • Follow
Author
  • Boy, Hampus Lindholm got screwed (Trending Topics)

    Getty Images

    The thing with the NHL’s current CBA is that we know it’s not fair to the players. The last three labor stoppages were lockouts driven by owner greed, and all the leverage players might have had — or at least should have — has been sapped by the league over a period of two decades.

    The way this manifests itself most plainly is for the League’s youngest players. In almost every case these days, even the highest-level young players in the game simply cannot get paid what they should be, or would be on the open market. This is due in large part to the fact that the general managers in the league long ago assented to an unspoken rule: Don’t sign each other’s restricted free agents.

    [ Join a Yahoo Daily Fantasy Hockey contest now]

    The reason why they do this is obvious: While they might be able to improve their teams by poaching a Ryan O’Reilly or Shea Weber — just to name the last guys to actually sign an offer sheet — the inflationary nature of the salaries needed to attract those players

    Read More »from Boy, Hampus Lindholm got screwed (Trending Topics)
  • Huge if True: Would the Flames actually trade Dougie Hamilton?

    Getty Images

    [Breaking down the plausibility of the week’s biggest rumor.]

    A lot of attention is paid to a good young defenseman in Western Canada who may or may not have fallen out of favor with his club. But this time around, it’s not Jacob Trouba who spent the past several days as the subject of the most intriguing trade rumors in the NHL.

    Instead, the somewhat surprising revelation from a number of reputable sources was that the Calgary Flames may or may not be shopping Dougie Hamilton started to percolate over the weekend. The idea here is that Calgary may no longer enamored of their young defender, less a year and a half after giving him six years at $5.75 million against the cap.

    It would certainly be an interesting wrinkle in this early season, and there is some foundation for the rumors in terms of how Hamilton is used, and has been for some time.

    Take, for example, Hamilton’s ice time last season, as he averaged 19:46 per game under Bob Hartley. This was the fifth-highest number on the

    Read More »from Huge if True: Would the Flames actually trade Dougie Hamilton?
  • Calgary's start, injured Stars and Chicago's PK (Puck Daddy Countdown)

    CALGARY, AB - OCTOBER 18: Johnny Gaudreau #13 of the Calgary Flames in action against the Buffalo Sabres during an NHL game at Scotiabank Saddledome on October 18, 2016 in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. (Photo by Derek Leung/Getty Images)
    CALGARY, AB – OCTOBER 18: Johnny Gaudreau #13 of the Calgary Flames in action against the Buffalo Sabres during an NHL game at Scotiabank Saddledome on October 18, 2016 in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. (Photo by Derek Leung/Getty Images)

    (Ed. Note: The column formerly known as the Puck Daddy Power Rankings. Ryan Lambert takes a look at some of the biggest issues and stories in the NHL, and counts them down.)

    8. Calgary’s start

    Do not, my friends, wade into Flames Twitter these days. There is nothing there for you.

    Unless of course you want to revel in schaedenfreude, in which case, dive in headfirst.

    Calgary picked up a shootout win on Monday night to earn their second W of the season, but a quick look at the standings found them still sitting third-last in a pathetic division, and ahead of only Arizona in points per game. They don’t have a single regulation win yet this season, meaning that opponents have taken 12 of a possible 14 points from them in seven games so far.

    Fingers are flying

    Read More »from Calgary's start, injured Stars and Chicago's PK (Puck Daddy Countdown)
  • NCAA Hockey 101: North Dakota barely taking care of business

     

    Getty Images
    Getty Images

    Anecdotally, the very best teams in any sport say they have a tough time because any time they play anyone, they get that opponent’s A-plus game. Very few teams will go into such a contest anything less than hyped up and ready to go.

    It is therefore understandable why a team like North Dakota would want to schedule soft opening opponents. Ease yourself into the season, collect some crucial W’s, and see where you stand before the actual tough competition ratchets up.

    That seems to have been North Dakota’s plan for this year.

    Much of the Fighting Hawks schedule was undoubtedly set long before they won the national title last spring, and you can only play the teams in front of you. But while North Dakota is 5-0, and haven’t left the greater Grand Forks area yet this season, you have to say that it’s tough to determine how good this team actually is.

    Many other top-level teams have had something resembling measuring-stick games. The Nos. 2 and 5 teams in the country right now

    Read More »from NCAA Hockey 101: North Dakota barely taking care of business
  • What We Learned: Behind the Montreal Canadiens' hot start

    October 20, 2016: Shea Weber (6) of the Montreal Canadiens salutes the crowd after the third period of the NHL game between the Arizona Coyotes and the Montreal Canadiens at the Bell Centre in Montreal, QC (Photo by Vincent Ethier/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)

    (Hello, this is a feature that will run through the entire season and aims to recap the weekend’s events and boils those events down to one admittedly superficial fact or stupid opinion about each team. Feel free to complain about it.) 

    After Sunday night’s games, there was one team in the NHL without a regulation loss: the Montreal Canadiens

    The blew out the Sabres, Penguins(!), Coyotes and Bruins, and also lost in a shootout (so not even real hockey) to Ottawa. And that’s with Carey Price only playing in two games.

    Now, we fundamentally understand that Montreal isn’t this good, in part because no one is. On paper the Canadiens seem to be fairly mediocre if anything else. But mediocre teams go 4-0-1 sometimes, and sometimes even bad teams do it (see also: Vancouver).

    One of the reasons people generally seemed so down on Montreal coming into this year was that Michel Therrien is still the coach of this team and while he’s a lot of things, confidence-inspiring doesn’t necessarily seem

    Read More »from What We Learned: Behind the Montreal Canadiens' hot start
  • Why does Henrik Lundqvist start slow? (Trending Topics)

    NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 13: Henrik Lundqvist #30 of the New York Rangers skates against the New York Islanders at Madison Square Garden on October 13, 2016 in New York City. The Rangers defeated the Islanders 5-3. (Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)
    NEW YORK, NY – OCTOBER 13: Henrik Lundqvist #30 of the New York Rangers skates against the New York Islanders at Madison Square Garden on October 13, 2016 in New York City. The Rangers defeated the Islanders 5-3. (Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)

    It was hard not to notice Henrik Lundqvist having another rough outing on Wednesday night. Bad giveaway for a goal, yeah, but also stopping just 16 of 18 overall isn’t very good.

    And hey, bad performances happen to even the best goalies on earth. They’ve been a little more common than the New York Rangers might like so far in this (extremely) young season, but you roll with it a little bit and hopefully things work out for you long-term. Certainly, expecting Lundqvist to stay below .900 on his save percentage is a fool’s errand, but on some level, you don’t like to see a team expected to have a decent amount of problems squandering what has been a solid start to the season, possession-wise.

    [Join a Yahoo Daily Fantasy Hockey contest now]

    Read More »from Why does Henrik Lundqvist start slow? (Trending Topics)
  • Puck Lists: Ranking every starter based on their name's spoonerism

    BOSTON, MA - FEBRUARY 28: Ben Bishop #30 of the Tampa Bay Lightning looks on during the third period against the Boston Bruins at TD Garden on February 28, 2016 in Boston, Massachusetts. The Lightning defeat the Bruins 4-1. (Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)
    BOSTON, MA – FEBRUARY 28: Ben Bishop #30 of the Tampa Bay Lightning looks on during the third period against the Boston Bruins at TD Garden on February 28, 2016 in Boston, Massachusetts. The Lightning defeat the Bruins 4-1. (Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)

    Spoonerisms have seen an odd uptick in popularity in recent years, mainly on Twitter.

    The idea is basically that if someone tweets something with which you disagree, you just say their name back to them with the letters reversed. If I make a dumb tweet (impossible), you reply, “Lyan Rambert,” to show that you are not taking what I say seriously. It’s dumb itself, but it’s effective.

    And once you start doing it, it is very difficult to stop. Tronald Dump and Clillary Hinton are both very strong. And college football’s Dark Mantonio is even stronger. Kave Dingman? Also up there. Or NFL washout/possible burnout Gosh Jordon. People love spoonerisms, is what I am saying to you.

    Meanwhile, I have always been fascinated with hockey

    Read More »from Puck Lists: Ranking every starter based on their name's spoonerism
  • Bad NHL takes, Oilers vs. CBA and cute dogs (Puck Daddy Countdown)

    Getty Images

    (Ed. Note: The column formerly known as the Puck Daddy Power Rankings. Ryan Lambert takes a look at some of the biggest issues and stories in the NHL, and counts them down.)

    7 – Circumventing the CBA cuz your boss guilts you into it

    Hey wow the Oilers played like garbage in a game recently. That never happens, right?

    So anyway, they played so badly — and Connor McDavid was so bad personally — that as The New Captain he probably felt like he needed to show he’s a company man or whatever. So they had a practice even though they should have had a CBA-mandated day off.

    And why did they do it? Because Todd McLellan asked them to!

    Now folks, I’m not saying players don’t occasionally deserve to get bag-skated for playing like crap, but what do you do when you have a day off built into your schedule thanks to one of the extremely few gives from management? Let’s ask Colby Armstrong:

    Read More »from Bad NHL takes, Oilers vs. CBA and cute dogs (Puck Daddy Countdown)
  • NCAA Hockey 101: Let's talk about Maine

     

    Maine

    It wasn’t that long ago that a year like 2015-16 would have been unthinkable for Maine hockey.

    Eight wins. That’s it. In a whole damn season. And not one of those wins came against a team with a record of .500 or better. And really, it wasn’t just last season. Maine hockey has been putrid for years, less than a decade after making two consecutive Frozen Fours.

    There are a lot of reasons why the Black Bears haven’t been consistently good for a long time. Coaching problems have been obvious, but more to the point the recruiting just hasn’t been there. Red Gendron and Tim Whitehead before them could still get a handful of good players, but depth routinely fails them. With more schools in Division 1 than ever, it’s hard to attract kids to a college that’s 20 miles from nowhere, and whose last national title — which you still hear about endlessly — came when they were in diapers. It’s not a new problem, and it’s why they have one 20-win season since 2007-08.

    The athletics budget has been

    Read More »from NCAA Hockey 101: Let's talk about Maine
  • What We Learned: When NHL teams don’t know they’re rebuilding

    Getty Images

    (Hello, this is a feature that will run through the entire season and aims to recap the weekend’s events and boils those events down to one admittedly superficial fact or stupid opinion about each team. Feel free to complain about it.) 

    Call it one hand not knowing what the other is doing.

    The good news for the Canucks is that they know they should be rebuilding this roster. It’s flat-out not very good, even if it’s leaning young. Ryan Miller, The Sedins, Alex Burrows, Loui Eriksson, Derek Dorsett, Alex Edler and Jannik Hansen are all on the wrong side of 30, but that’s only eight guys. It’s not a terrible position.

    The bad news for the Canucks is that they seem to not know how to go about this rebuild, with a combination of misevaluation of talent and an idea that they’re significantly better than they actually are. The GM and the team president seem to very much not be on the same page.

    This has become a bit of a well-known laugh line already, but for those who haven’t heard, Trevor

    Read More »from What We Learned: When NHL teams don’t know they’re rebuilding

Pagination

(813 Stories)