Jeff Eisenberg

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Jeff Eisenberg is the editor of the Dagger. Prior to joining Yahoo! Sports in Feb. 2010, Eisenberg worked for 4 1/2 years at The Press-Enterprise covering everything from UCLA basketball, to USC football, to the Los Angeles Lakers. If he's not watching basketball, you'll usually find Eisenberg enjoying the California sunshine, sampling craft brews or cooking on the grill.

  • Ex-North Carolina player: Women's basketball being made a 'scapegoat'

    Even though North Carolina likely won't respond to the NCAA's Notice of Allegations for another few weeks, one of the school's former women's basketball players fears she knows what's coming.

    Meghan Austin expects the Tar Heels athletic department to sacrifice its tradition-rich women's basketball program in hopes of avoiding serious punishment for its two biggest revenue producers, football and men's basketball. 

    Austin, a 2008 North Carolina graduate currently coaching at Montreat College, penned an editorial for the Raleigh News & Observer on Monday accusing the Tar Heels athletic department of already showing signs of making its women's basketball program "the scapegoat." Austin noted that men's coach Roy Williams got a contract extension earlier this summer but women's coach Sylvia Hatchell has thus far not received the same show of support.

    "Our program was not the only team in the report, yet we are the ones being talked about the most. Roy Williams and his program were in the

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  • Why an AAU team chose to name itself the Motor City Muslims

    The Motor City Muslims pose for a team picture clad in warmups that read Brotherhood. (via Ali Altimimy)The Motor City Muslims pose for a team picture clad in warmups that read Brotherhood. (via Ali Altimimy)

    Only a few weeks before their debut tournament this past spring, members of the nation's only known all-Muslim AAU basketball team were still grappling with an important decision.

    Did they want to select a team name that would make it easier to blend in on the AAU circuit or one that would highlight the differences between themselves and their opponents?

    The Motor City Muslims logo (via Ali Altimimy)The Motor City Muslims logo (via Ali Altimimy)A brainstorming session among the players produced some tolerable yet unimaginative possibilities, from the Ballers, to the Warriors, to the Mustangs. Coach Clarence Archibald offered a more daring alternative when he suggested the team show pride in its faith and culture by opting for a name featuring either the word "Muslim" or "Islam."

    "Some of them were a little hesitant, but I pushed pretty hard," Archibald said. "We all know Islam often is unfortunately portrayed in a negative way in the media. I wanted to be sure we were easily identifiable as an all-Muslim team because it gave us an opportunity to change people's mindsets by

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  • NCAA's tweaks to selection process are subtle but much-needed

    The NCAA announced a pair of subtle but smart tweaks to its selection and seeding process on Monday, one to prevent last March's biggest controversy from reoccurring and the other to avoid a potential issue that nearly arose at the top of the bracket.

    The first change ensures that the last four at-large teams voted into the 68-team tournament field no longer automatically are sent to the First Four. Now the selection committee has the freedom to elevate one or more into the main draw if the ensuing seed scrubbing process reveals they a stronger resume than a team initially voted in ahead of them.  

    This change should be known as the UCLA rule even though the NCAA's release makes no mention of the Bruins. It's a clear response to the uproar over UCLA receiving a spot in the NCAA tournament's main draw last March when many analysts were skeptical Steve Alford's team even had a resume worthy of the First Four. 

    UCLA's inclusion in the main draw ahead of the four teams sent to the First

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  • In a pressure-packed season, UNLV still opts for a tough schedule

    Many coaches whose jobs are in jeopardy assemble a cupcake-heavy schedule designed to make getting to 20 wins as attainable as possible.

    Dave Rice certainly did not take such an easy way out.

    The embattled UNLV coach has put together a schedule laden with challenging opponents entering what appears to be a sink-or-swim season for him and his staff. The Rebels haven't won an NCAA tournament game in Rice's first four seasons and they haven't reached the postseason at all the past two years.  

    The first big challenge for UNLV will be the Maui Invitational, which includes national powers Kansas, Indiana and UCLA and improving Vanderbilt and Wake Forest. The Rebels would probably have to pull an upset to finish with a winning record in Lahaina. 

    UNLV also has three matchups with Pac-12 competition, a road game at likely preseason top 15 Arizona, a home game against Arizona State and a neutral-court matchup in Las Vegas against a very strong Oregon team. The Rebels pulled off a memorable

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  • Three things we learned from Kansas winning the World University Games

    A team consisting mostly of Kansas players won the U.S.'s first World University Games championship in 10 years on Monday. The U.S. overcame a late deficit to defeat Germany in double overtime in the gold-medal game.

    For Kansas, the hope is that a high-level tournament like this will provide a nice springboard into the new season this fall. Here's a look at the three biggest things we learned about Kansas the past few weeks in Korea:

    1. Wayne Selden may finally be ready for a breakout year

    The Wayne Selden that Kansas fans had been hoping to see the past two seasons finally emerged the past few weeks in Korea. The rising junior wing averaged 19.3 points and 6.5 rebounds in Team USA's eight games, all while shooting a much higher percentage than he did during a topsy-turvy sophomore season in which he struggled to finish at the rim.

    An exhausted Selden shot only 6-for-28 in Monday's double overtime title game against Germany, but even then he found a way to make an impact. He sank a

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  • Eight takeaways from the Nike Peach Jam tournament

    NORTH AUGUSTA, S.C. — The highlight of the first week of the July live period is the Nike EYBL finals at the Peach Jam, an event that annually lures some of the most well-known college coaches in the nation thanks to its star-studded field.

    I spent this past Thursday, Friday and Saturday at the Peach Jam watching games and chatting with the coaches on hand. I've written extensively about Duke's recruiting successes already, but here are eight other takeaways from the event:

    1. At a tournament featuring many of the most coveted prospects in the nation, the MVP was an unranked 5-foot-9 point guard without nearly as much hype. Auburn commit Jared Harper was outstanding at times during the tournament, tallying 24 points in the semifinals and 34 in the title game to lead a loaded Georgia Stars team to the championship. With Auburn coach Bruce Pearl watching courtside, Harper expertly controlled the pace of play and showed a knack for scoring and passing, sinking 21 threes in eight games

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  • How Duke reclaimed its status as the top destination for elite recruits

    The most exaggerated storyline from Duke's national title run this past spring was the notion that the Blue Devils' reliance on one-and-done freshmen represented some sort of seismic shift in recruiting philosophy.

    In reality, Mike Krzyzewski has long pursued prospects of that caliber. The difference is Krzyzewski is now landing them in bunches.

    A Duke program that once appeared to be falling behind both Kentucky and North Carolina in the hunt for elite talent suddenly is threatening to overtake both as college basketball's trendiest destination for top recruits.

    In their past two recruiting classes, the Blue Devils have landed seven Rivals.com Top 25 prospects — Jahlil Okafor, Justise Winslow, Tyus Jones, Brandon Ingram, Chase Jeter, Derryck Thornton and Luke Kennard. Duke added to its haul Sunday when elite forward Jayson Tatum, Rivals.com's No. 3 prospect in the Class of 2016, chose the Blue Devils over fellow suitors North Carolina, Kentucky and Saint Louis.

    The scary thing for

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  • Top recruits Harry Giles, Jayson Tatum ponder potential package deal

    NORTH AUGUSTA, S.C. — Two of the top recruits in the Class of 2016 couldn't help but notice last spring when longtime friends Tyus Jones and Jahlil Okafor achieved their goal of capturing the national championship together.

    Forwards Harry Giles and Jayson Tatum have spoken about trying to do something similar in college, whether at Duke or one of the other top programs that would gladly make room for both of them.  

    “You see something like that, two great players teaming up, it definitely influences you,” Tatum said. “They had one goal in mind, they accomplished it and they had a great time doing it. Who wouldn’t want to do that?”

    The increasing possibility that Giles and Tatum could opt to play together in college could make Duke, Kentucky or North Carolina next year’s big winners in recruiting. The Blue Devils are regarded as the favorite to land Tatum, while the Wildcats and Tar Heels are the only other programs both players are still considering.

    Whereas Jones and Okafor conducted

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  • Eight noteworthy stats from the NCAA's annual attendance report

    Syracuse is college basketball's attendance kings for the second straight year.

    The Orange edged Kentucky and Louisville for the crown, drawing an average of 23,854 fans a game despite an uncharacteristically mediocre season and a self-imposed postseason ban. The Wildcats were second at 23,572 fans per game and the Cardinals were third at 21,386.

    The NCAA released its entire attendance report from the 2014-15 college basketball season Monday. Here's a look at some of the stats that stand out:

    • Highest attendance per game: 1. Syracuse (23,854), 2. Kentucky (23,572), 3. Louisville (21,386)

    Comment: Syracuse's two-year run as average attendance leaders is notable because Kentucky had long been the kings in that category. Before the 2013-14 season, the Wildcats finished No. 1 in 17 of the previous 18 years.

    • Lowest attendance per game: 1. Grambling (305), 2. St. Peter's (442), 3. Chicago State (477)

    Comment: How did Grambling manage to draw smaller crowds than most high school teams last

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  • Four things we learned from the U-19 World Championships

    The FIBA U-19 World Championships concluded Sunday with a dramatic title game rife with clutch shots, jaw-dropping highlights and end-to-end action.   

    Croatia's Luka Bozic could have given his team the lead when he went to the free throw line trailing by one with four seconds left in regulation, but instead he offered the U.S. new life by sinking only one of two foul shots. The heavily favored Americans responded by seizing control in overtime and escaping with a well-earned 79-71 victory.

    Give USA Basketball credit for winning gold at the past two U-19 World Championships because that age level has traditionally been the most difficult for the Americans to dominate. Before its victory in 2013, the U.S. had only held the U-19 world title once since 1995, a product of other nations sending more cohesive teams and top American prospects passing on the chance to play to focus on preparing for college or the NBA draft instead.

    Besides delivering heartache for Croatia and a mixture of

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