Jay Hart

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Jay Hart is a Senior Editor for Yahoo! Sports.

  • Phil Mickelson falls hard on Muirfield's unforgiving greens in Round 2 of British Open

    GULLANE, Scotland – The roars stopped for Phil Mickelson on the 16th hole when, out of the blue, his putting stroke failed him.

    A four-putt, three of which came from inside 4 feet, sent him tumbling over par for the first time in 34 holes of the British Open. As he strolled up to the 17th fairway, after a perfect tee shot, the crowd watched in stunned silence, in a pall really, not knowing what to do. Eventually it managed a few claps, one "Go Phil," as the normally jovial Mickelson sauntered by staring at the ground.

    To that point, it had been a grueling, but effective second round for Mickelson. He sat 1-under par, only one stroke back of where he started Friday and just three back of then-leader Zach Johnson. A par at 16, then birdie at the next hole, a reachable-in-two par-5, would move him into a tie with Tiger Woods and in the middle of the hunt.Phil Mickelson read the greens well enough on No. 18 to score a par-4 on Friday. (AP)

    He's still in the hunt – just four strokes back of 49-year-old Miguel Angel Jimenez – but has a little more ground to make up.

    [Related:

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  • British Open greens spark complaints from players

    GULLANE, Scotland – Golfers complaining about course conditions are like models bemoaning a slick runway.Boo-freaking-hoo.

    And while the protests fired after the first round of the British Open won't draw much sympathy outside the ropes, they were pointed, harsh and, well, funny.

    Ian Poulter made his opinions known on Twitter after firing a 1-over 72.

    At issue is the speed of Muirfield's greens. The unseasonably warm and dry weather coupled with a constant breeze shooting off the Firth of Forth – even the seas here sound formal – has made for marble-like conditions on the putting surfaces. On 15, Rory McIlroy lagged a 60-some-foot putt that moseyed by the hole and kept trickling all the way into a backside bunker. On 17, Phil Mickelson tried to lag a 15-footer only to watch it slip seven feet by the hole.

    But the

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  • Criticism of Muirfield for not allowing female members doesn't make the cut

    GULLANE, Scotland – In the lead up to Thursday's British Open, the big stink here was that Muirfield, host of the 142nd edition of the Open Championship, doesn't allow female members.

    Predictably, cue the media outrage. Never mind that this is an issue that has no impact on any of our lives – Muirfield isn't in the cards on a journalist's salary – nor the lives of 99.9999999 (I could keep going) percent of the women on this planet. When there's low-hanging fruit to be picked, well, we'll pick it.

    As you said, Peter Dawson, chief executive of the Royal & Ancient Golf Club, was asked in a news conference Wednesday, single-sex clubs are legal, but morally, what's the difference between men only and whites only?

    Peter Dawson, chief executive of the R&A, addresses the media regarding Muirfield's 'controversial' policy. (Getty Images) "Oh goodness me, I think that's a ridiculous question, if I may say so," Dawson responded. "There's a massive difference between racial discrimination, anti-Semitism, where sectors of society are downtrodden and treated very, very badly, indeed. And to compare that with a men's golf

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  • David Duval still striving to recapture former glory

    GULLANE, Scotland – Everywhere he went, the whispers were the same:

    Is that David Duval?

    Yes, it was David Duval making his way around Muirfield on Wednesday in final preparation for the British Open, and while most golf fans know who David Duval is, they can't believe he's here. It's been 12 years since his last Tour win, which also marked the climax of his career. Since winning the 2001 British Open, Duval has gone from Tiger Woods' No. 1 rival to a guy just trying to hang on.

    David Duval, practicing at Muirfield on Tuesday, says he's close to returning to his old form. (Getty Images)He hasn't made a cut in six events in 2013, earned $32,936 in prize money last year and is currently ranked 1,514th in the world – or 1,513 spots lower than he was in 1999.

    And yet raising the Claret Jug on Sunday, he said, isn't out of the question.

    "As we sit here and talk Wednesday afternoon, I feel like if I can do what I've been doing in practice and have been working on, I will play well," Duval told Yahoo! Sports. "Does that translate to winning? Well, I wouldn't be surprised if I had an opportunity to."

    He'd

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  • Tiger Woods' major obstacle: He's good, but no longer dominant

    Tiger Woods plays a shot during a practice round at Muirfield before the British Open begins Thursday. (AP Photo)

    GULLANE, Scotland – A shot here and a shot there, that's how Tiger Woods, as he preps for yet another major championship, explained the difference between winning Major No. 15 and sitting on 14 for five years and counting.

    He specifically pointed to this year's Masters where bad luck turned a great shot into a killer. He hit a dead-on approach to 15 in Round 2 only to have it hit the pin, carom back into the water to spark Drop-gate that eventually led to an 8. Had his approached missed the pin, Tiger likely cards a birdie and there's a good chance he would have been wearing the green jacket that Sunday night and his run at Jack Nicklaus' record of 18 majors would be back on track.

    But here's the thing about the what-ifs: Since when did Tiger Woods need a stroke here, a stroke there to win anything?

    Of his 14 Major wins, seven were by three strokes or more and four by as many as five. Only three times has he won by a single stroke or been stretched to a playoff.

    Sunday red didn't become a

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  • Blackhawks now facing tough fight against Kings, with or without Duncan Keith

    LOS ANGELES – It took nearly an hour, but finally Jeff Carter emerged from the Los Angeles Kings dressing room, fresh stitches poking out from under his right lip. Those came courtesy of a high stick from Chicago defenseman Duncan Keith, who was trying to get Carter's attention but wound up doing more than that.

    As the two skated up ice midway through the second period after a brief scuffle in the Chicago zone, Keith swung his stick upward at a streaking Carter, catching him in the face. Carter immediately went down; Keith went to the penalty box with a questionably light four-minute minor.

    "You can watch the video," Carter said when asked if it was a dirty play. "Draw your own assumptions."

    Kings center Jeff Carter (right) left Game 3 with some stitches after getting hit by Duncan Keith. (USA Today Sports)Darryl Sutter doesn't need to see the video. The Kings coach has already drawn his assumption.

    "It's retaliation with a stick," he said. "It's not a high stick. … Don't even need video."

    Keith may get a phone call Wednesday from Brendan Shanahan, the NHL's director of player safety, who will decide if

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  • Kings sound desperate to hold Stanley Cup again after winning Game 7 thriller over Sharks

    LOS ANGELES – Dustin Brown sat in the locker room, pads still on, teeth still out, sweat still dripping down his face, when he pondered where it all turned around for the Los Angeles Kings.

    They were an eight seed in last year's playoffs, yet waltzed straight on through the Stanley Cup playoffs without ever facing an elimination game in what amounted to one of the more dominant postseason runs in NHL history. And now here they are again, having survived a grueling 2-1 victory over the San Jose Sharks in Game 7 of the conference semifinals on Tuesday night.

    How did the Kings get from there – the lowest seed ever to win a Stanley Cup – to here, on a path to win back-to-back titles?

    Two things.

    Justin Williams scored both of the Kings' goals Tuesday night to push L.A. into the Western Conference final. (AP) "First, sometimes you have to lose before you can win," Brown said. 

    And the second?

    "I didn't know this until June 12 last year," he explained. "Those previous years, when we got knocked out by Vancouver and San Jose, I didn't truly know what I just lost out on. And that's just a different perspective

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  • Malcolm Armstead's decision to pay his own way at Wichita State leads to Final Four trip

    LOS ANGELES – Of all the people who bet on Wichita State to reach the 2013 Final Four, no one's gamble paid off bigger Saturday night than Malcolm Armstead's.

    Here is a kid who two years ago left a full-ride scholarship at Oregon for a part-time job at a car dealership in Cheney, Kan., all with a hope that he'd play point guard for the Shockers this season. There were no scholarships available at Wichita State, so he took out student loans, put himself in debt all because he thought Gregg Marshall's program provided the best environment for him to play basketball.

    To reset that, he thought paying his way at Wichita State, a Missouri Valley Conference member, was a better place for him to play than a full ride at the University of Oregon, a Pac-12 member and Phil Knight's personal philanthropy.

    Friday night, Oregon got bounced from the NCAA tournament by Louisville. Less than 24 hours later, Armstead, the Ducks' former point guard, helped Wichita State – the

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  • Wichita State's Carl Hall trades in light bulbs for hoops after overcoming heart condition

    LOS ANGELES – Sitting in the bowels of Staples Center, just a few minutes removed from a 16-point, eight-rebound, three-block performance, Carl Hall talked about making light bulbs.

    "I worked in what they called the paint booth – I painted the lights," the Shockers' forward explained after helping ninth-seeded Wichita State beat LaSalle 72-58 to move within a game of reaching the Final Four. "I worked the graveyard shift, from 11 at night to 7 in the morning."

    Shockers forward Carl Hall shoots over La Salle Explorers forward Jerrell Wright on Thursday night. (USA TODAY Sports)He made 12 bucks an hour – which was a lot, he said, for an 18-year-old living at home with his mother. When he'd get home from work he'd go straight to school, head home for a quick na, then back to the factory.

    Working in the factory wasn't part of his plan. Playing basketball was, but while playing one day in high school, he fainted. Dehydration, the doctors told him. Then he fainted again six months later. And then again. And that's when he found out he suffered from neurocardiogenic syncope, a condition that means the

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  • Fence repaired, Daytona 500 will go on, NASCAR searching for answers

    DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. – Neither NASCAR nor Daytona International Speedway has a lot of answers following the horrific crash at the conclusion of Saturday's Nationwide Series race that sent shards of metal and two tires flying into the stands injuring at least 28 fans.

    The prevailing sentiment offered from NASCAR's vice president of operations Steve O'Donnell and track president Joie Chitwood was they don't have a lot of answers, they're going to look into the situation and they'll do whatever they can to create an even safer environment in the future.

    Rescue workers respond next to a hole in the catchfence. (REUTERS)Track officials worked into the early morning Sunday to repair the hole ripped in the catchfence following the 12-car accident on the final lap of the Race4COPD 300. Work was completed at 2 a.m. ET. Chitwood and O'Donnell met at 8 a.m. Sunday morning to review the repairs, are confident they are satisfactory and the 55th running of the Daytona 500 will start on time, at 1:30 p.m.

    Asked if the speedway would consider

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