Jay Hart

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Jay Hart is a Senior Editor for Yahoo! Sports.

  • Medal count | Olympic schedule | Olympic news

    Before this week, had you ever heard the words “fart pool” connected?

    Did you know there was trash talk in swimming?

    Or that Hope Solo has control issues?

    Maybe not everything coming out of Rio has been a surprise. But it certainly has been entertaining.

    Maybe not Bob Costas’ eye entertaining, but come on, that Hungarian husband? Tell me you didn’t want to see his reaction after his wife, Katinka Hosszu, finally lost.

    The Rio Games haven’t been the disaster many predicted. Yeah, one guy got sick in Guanabara Bay, the diving pool looks like it got green slimed and Michael Phelps settled for just five golds and (gasp) a silver, but it’s also had Simone Biles living up to the ridiculous hype, Katie Ledecky admitting she “realized” she’d won the 800 freestyle … before the race started and introduced us all to the “Shot Diva.”

    There are two other words never strung together in the history of vocal communication.

    One week down, another to go. The

    Read More »from Rio Week 1 in review: Fart pool, Hope Solo and no Bob Costas' eye
  • Even Jack Nicklaus thinks the USGA messed up the U.S. Open

    OAKMONT, Pa. — Jordan Spieth couldn't believe it. Rory McIlroy was incredulous. And if you want the ultimate authority chiming in on the USGA nearly turning the final round of the 116th U.S. Open into a complete debacle, how about Jack Nicklaus.

    With Dustin Johnson in the clubhouse at Oakmont Country Club, reviewing video with the USGA to determine if he'd incur a one-stroke penalty for something that happened more than three hours earlier, Nicklaus, standing on the 18th green where he would soon put the gold medal around Johnson's neck, was asked if he'd ever experienced anything like what Johnson just did.

    Here's what Johnson experienced: standing over a putt on the fifth hole, Johnson saw his ball move. Certain he hadn't grounded his club, which would have meant a 1-stroke penalty, Johnson still called in a rules official to be safe. After a brief discussion, the official was satisfied that Johnson had done nothing wrong, and play resumed. Dustin Johnson didn't have to sweat too hard over a controversial penalty stroke at the U.S. Open. (AP) Dustin Johnson didn't have to sweat too hard over a controversial penalty stroke at the U.S. Open. (AP)

    Read More »from Even Jack Nicklaus thinks the USGA messed up the U.S. Open
  • Johnson wins U.S. Open despite Sunday rules fiasco

    OAKMONT, Pa.—Dustin Johnson finally has his major victory, winning the U.S. Open, but not without the USGA getting in his way and nearly turning their national championship into a fisaco.

    Standing at the 12th tee at Oakmont Country Club, holding a two-stroke lead in the U.S. Open, Johnson got a visit from several USGA officials.

    They wanted to let him know that he may have incurred a penalty back on the fifth hole. And just like that, the 116th U.S. Open was engulfed in controversy.

    Johnson, on the fifth green, had called in a rules official to inform him Johnson's ball had moved. Per USGA rules, it's a one-stroke penalty if he had grounded his club. Johnson assured the official he hadn't, so no harm, no foul. Until there was, at least in the USGA's eyes.

    Apparently officials reviewed video and determined that Johnson had in fact caused the ball to move. Or at least had enough question in their minds to inform Johnson—in the middle of his

    Read More »from Johnson wins U.S. Open despite Sunday rules fiasco
  • Dustin Johnson penalized for moving ball [UPDATE]

    OAKMONT, Pa.—Standing on the 12th tee, Dustin Johnson held a two-stroke lead in the U.S. Open. Then several USGA officials approached Johnson, and his lead might not have been so large after all.

    Back on the fifth green, Johnson had stood over a short par putt, then backed off and called in a rules official. His ball had moved. Johnson wanted to let the official know of the movement, and that he had not grounded his club. If he had, he would be facing a one-stroke penalty. [UPDATE: Johnson was indeed penalized, but won the U.S. Open regardless.]

    The rules official at the fifth hole was satisfied that Johnson hadn't incurred a penalty, so Johnson continued on, draining the putt.

    But video replay may have shown rules officials otherwise. USGA officials approached Johnson on the 12th tee to inform him that the tale of the moving ball wasn't yet finished.

    After the discussion with officials on the 12th tee, Johnson's playing partner Lee Westwood appeared to be pleading a case to the USGA

    Read More »from Dustin Johnson penalized for moving ball [UPDATE]
  • U.S. Open: Why the longest of shots hasn't faded

    OAKMONT, Pa. — When he led after Round 1, the thought was, "Nice story, but he'll fade."

    When he went bogey, bogey, double bogey in the middle of Round 2 it was, "Well, there he goes."

    So what is there to say now after 49 holes that the kid, Andrew Landry, ranked 624th in the world, is still very much in the mix at the 116th U.S. Open?

    Shane Lowry held the lead as Round 3 was suspended due to darkness Saturday night. At 5-under with four holes still to play, Lowry held a 2-stroke lead over Landry. (UPDATE: As Round 3 concluded Sunday morning, Lowry moved to 7-under to stretch his lead to four over Landry and Dustin Johnson.)

    But so far nothing has fazed Landry. Not the grandness of the stage. Not the bogey spurt in the middle of Round 2. Not playing alongside ultra-bomber Dustin Johnson in Saturday afternoon's Round 3, where Landry routinely found himself 30-plus yards behind in virtually every fairway. Not back-to-back bogies when things

    Read More »from U.S. Open: Why the longest of shots hasn't faded
  • U.S. Open Round 3 cheat sheet: What happened to Andrew Landry?

    Andrew Landry hits from rough on the sixth hole. (AP)Andrew Landry hits from rough on the sixth hole. (AP)Updated as of 2:15 p.m. ET

    OAKMONT, Pa. — Thought Andrew Landry would shrivel up under the U.S. Open pressure and go away, didn't you?

    Looked that way for a moment, when the stunning first-round leader went bogey-bogey-double on the front nine of Round 2 Saturday to fall from 4-under to even par. But Landry held tough – real tough. He birdied 13, drained a long birdie putt at 17, then stuck his approach at 18 to three feet for another birdie.

    And just like that, the 624th-ranked player in the world worked his way into the final group when Round 3 begins sometime around 3 p.m. Saturday afternoon. Landry (3-under) will be paired with Dustin Johnson (4-under) and Scott Piercy (2-under).

    "I feel very comfortable," Landry said after firing a second-round 71. "I feel like this golf course suits me very well. I can just get out there and play my game. I don't have to – I'm not the player that's going to go out and shoot 28 under par. I've never been that guy, so I'm always the guy that's

    Read More »from U.S. Open Round 3 cheat sheet: What happened to Andrew Landry?
  • U.S. Open is Dustin Johnson's to win … or lose

    OAKMONT, Pa. — Dustin Johnson comes to every major trying to exorcise the demons. And if he needed a reminder of his mission Friday, all he had to do was look to his playing partner, Sergio Garcia, for a reminder.

    The USGA likes to have fun with its pairings come U.S. Open time. They've had the pleasantly plump pairing. They had the short-name long-name pairing Friday (Na, Kim and Aphibarnrat). DJ's was the best-players-never-to-have-won-majors pairing.

    Garcia is as famous for that as he is his enthusiasm. The wonder kid who almost won the PGA Championship as a 19-year-old in 1999 has finished second three other times in majors.

    What Sergio was to the majors in the 2000s, Johnson is to the 2010s.

    Multiple heartbreaks, grueling at times. Painful and unfortunate, too.

    Dustin Johnson greets fans on the way to the 14th tee. (AP)Dustin Johnson greets fans on the way to the 14th tee. (AP)He went to the 18th at the 2010 PGA with a one-stroke lead only to wind up fifth after he infamously hit a ball out of a hazard, incurring a 2-stroke penalty. He was charging toward

    Read More »from U.S. Open is Dustin Johnson's to win … or lose
  • U.S. Open: The Big Three deliver The Big Thud

    OAKMONT, Pa. — Jason Day arrived at the tee box of the 331-yard 14th and didn't hesitate. He whipped out his driver.

    All week long, in the lead up to the 116th U.S. Open here at Oakmont Country Club, player after player talked about leaving the driver in the bag, Day included. Better to play it safe than to tempt Oakmont's narrow corridors. Day estimated he'd maybe hit driver on four holes total.

    Jason Day reacts to his putt on the 18th hole. (AP)Jason Day reacts to his putt on the 18th hole. (AP)But there he was, at the 14th, grabbing driver without hesitation.

    And why not? He was sitting 5-over par for the championship, not a birdie on his card and very much in danger of missing the cut even with Round 1 not even in the books. The only solace out there, if he'd even consider it that, was that he wasn't alone.

    While the 624th-ranked player in the world sat atop the leaderboard, Oakmont had its way in Round 1 with not just Day, but Jordan Spieth and Rory McIlroy, as the Big Three delivered The Big Thud. Day, Spieth and Rory McIlroy, the world's

    Read More »from U.S. Open: The Big Three deliver The Big Thud
  • OAKMONT, Pa. — The 2016 U.S. Open is a mess, mostly because of stop-and-go rain Thursday that threw the schedule into chaos, but partly because of how the USGA has responded to said chaos.

    Consider this: At 7:30 a.m. ET Friday morning, when Round 1 play resumed, tournament leader Andrew Landry lined up a 10-foot putt on his final hole, drained it, then went home for the day.

    Two hours later, Phil Mickelson, who didn't play at all on Thursday, teed off to start his U.S. Open. If his round takes about 4½ hours to complete, that puts him in the clubhouse at around 2 p.m., giving him about two hours to regroup before he heads back out to the course for another 18 holes.

    So, Phil Mickeslon is going to play 36 holes Friday, while Andrew Landry will hit one putt.

    Fan leave the course during the third rain delay on Thursday. (AP)Fan leave the course during the third rain delay on Thursday. (AP)And it's going to be like that for the entire field.

    Tee times for the first two rounds are set up in waves – there's a morning wave and an afternoon wave, with waves flip-flopping between

    Read More »from US Open: Why Phil Mickelson will play 36 holes Friday while Andrew Landry will hit one putt
  • Andrew Landry brings his mother to tears at U.S. Open

    OAKMONT, Pa. — Sitting on a shuttle in a Macy's parking lot, on her way to the Houston airport earlier this week, Tricia Landry picked up her phone and dialed her son Andrew.

    "I just needed to hear your voice," she said, tears flowing down her face.

    "It's going to be OK," Andrew reassured her. "It's just another tournament."

    Only it's not really just another tournament; it's the U.S. Open. And it's especially not just another tournament for Andrew Landry, the Texan ranked 624th in the world who had to qualify just to be here.

    So on Thursday when her son strolled up the seventh fairway Thursday at mighty Oakmont, the leader of the U.S. Open by three strokes, Tricia Landry looked back.

    Back to the day she told her brother, a golfer, her two sons wanted to play the game. "Don't let 'em go to the range," he told her. "They'll get lazy. Buy 'em a bucket of balls and take 'em to the school."

    Back to the summer weekends in Texas when she and Drew (as she

    Read More »from Andrew Landry brings his mother to tears at U.S. Open

Pagination

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