Graham Watson

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Graham Watson is the editor of Dr. Saturday. Graham had a brief collegiate soccer career, but traded that in for the life of a journalist and hasn't looked back. Graham has worked for the Dallas Morning News and St. Louis Post-Dispatch, as well as ESPN.com and AOL. She is forever striving to be the cool mom to two boys.

  • Bob Diaco says he doesn't need UCF's permission to call it a rival

    FILE- In this Nov. 1, 2014 file photo, Connecticut head coach Bob Diaco watches from the sideline during the first quarter of an NCAA college football game against Central Florida in East Hartford, Conn. Diaco is looking forward to the team's big rivalry game with UCF this fall, and he's put a countdown clock in the school's training facility right above the game trophy. UCF's coach, on the other hand, says he didn't know there was a trophy, or a rivalry. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer, File)FILE- In this Nov. 1, 2014 file photo, Connecticut head coach Bob Diaco watches from the sideline during the first quarter of an NCAA college football game against Central Florida in East Hartford, Conn. Diaco is looking forward to the team's big rivalry game with UCF this fall, and he's put a countdown clock in the school's training facility right above the game trophy. UCF's coach, on the other hand, says he didn't know there was a trophy, or a rivalry. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer, File)UConn football coach Bob Diaco said Monday that he doesn’t need UCF’s permission to create a rivalry with the Knights.

    No, he really did say that.

    In true rivalry form, Diaco said he didn’t care whether UCF wanted to acknowledge the game as a rivalry and that he was calling it a rivalry and that was that.

    "Why do I have to call their athletic department to say we've got them targeted as our rival, period," Diaco said on a Monday morning conference call. "What control over that would they have and what do I care what they think?... If they don't want to honor our rivalry, we're not their rival, that's on them. I don't control what they want. If they don't want to be a part of the trophy, I don't care about that, either.”

    So this then becomes a philosophical question: Is it really a rivalry if the other teams doesn’t acknowledge it to be?

    UConn football on Twitter last week posted a picture of a trophy UConn created for the newly established rivalry dubbed “The Civil Conflict.”

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  • Germany shows why it's world No. 1 with 10-0 thrashing of Ivory Coast

    OTTAWA, ON - JUNE 7: Melanie Behringer #7 of Germany jumps to celebrate a goal with her teammates including Sara Dabritz #23 and Anja Mittag #11 during the FIFA Women's World Cup Canada 2015 Group B match between Germany and Cote d'Ivoire at Lansdowne Stadium on June 7, 2015 in Ottawa, Canada. (Photo by Andre Ringuette/Getty Images)OTTAWA, ON - JUNE 7: Melanie Behringer #7 of Germany jumps to celebrate a goal with her teammates including Sara Dabritz #23 and Anja Mittag #11 during the FIFA Women's World Cup Canada 2015 Group B match between Germany and Cote d'Ivoire at Lansdowne Stadium on June 7, 2015 in Ottawa, Canada. (Photo by Andre Ringuette/Getty Images)If Germany wanted to assert itself as the team to beat in the 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup, Sunday’s dominance over Ivory Coast was a nice start.

    The Germans scored 10 goals on 31 shots to notch the second-most lopsided victory in Women’s World Cup history.

    [Women's World Cup: Latest news | Scoreboard and Schedule | Groups and Teams]

    Germany came into the match as the No. 1 team according to FIFA’s world rankings and left the pitch with few doubters. It should be pointed out that Ivory Coast came into the game ranked 67th in the world, making this contests the biggest rankings discrepancy between opponents in Women’s World Cup history.

    Still, Germany dominated the match the way a No. 1 should dominated an inferior foe. Its first score came in the 3rd minute when star striker Celia Sasic buried the first of three goals on the day. Her other strikes came in the 15th minute and the 31st minute. It was the fastest hat trick in Women’s World Cup history.

    And it wasn’t the only hat trick.

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  • Norway dominated Thailand 4-0 to sit atop Group B

    Norway provided Women’s World Cup fans the first blowout of the tournament after dismantling Thailand 4-0 on Sunday.

    The result was not unexpected.

    [Women's World Cup: Latest news | Scoreboard and Schedule | Groups and Teams]

    Norway, the world’s 11th-ranked team, is one of the favorites to advance to the knockout rounds in Group B and Thailand was a late add to the World Cup after it qualified by virtue of North Korean players testing positive for steroids and being banned from the competition.

    Still, Thailand made it interesting early with a quality chance in the eighth minute, but that was one of very few opportunities.

    Norway opened the scoring in the 15th minute when Trine Ronning swung a free kick over the wall and past the outstretched arm of goalkeeper Waraporn Boonsing, who tipped the ball into the side netting.

    Norway would add two more goals by Isabell Herlovsen in the half to essentially put the game out of reach.

    Ada Hegerberg, Norway’s 19-year-old phenom, added the last

    Read More »from Norway dominated Thailand 4-0 to sit atop Group B
  • USMNT's Jurgen Klinsmann wishes USWNT good luck, urges support

    U.S. men’s national team coach Jurgen Klinsmann took a few minutes between celebrating the men’s unexpected win against the Netherlands and preparation for Wednesday’s game against Germany to wish the U.S. women’s team good luck on its upcoming World Cup run.

    The U.S. women open World Cup play Monday against Australia. Those two teams last met in 2013 and the U.S. walked away with a 4-0 victory at the Alamodome in San Antonio.

    [Women's World Cup: Latest news | Scoreboard and Schedule | Groups and Teams]

    The U.S. women are one of the favorites to win the FIFA Women’s World Cup, but first have to get through the “Group of Death,” which features three teams — U.S., Sweden and Australia — ranked in the top 10 of FIFA’s world rankings.

    And in case you’re wondering whether the famed American Outlaws heard Klinsmann’s impassioned plea, well, here’s your answer:

    Read More »from USMNT's Jurgen Klinsmann wishes USWNT good luck, urges support
  • Artificial turf during Women's World Cup registers 120 degrees

    There’s a reason why many female players were upset with FIFA’s decision to use artificial turf during the World Cup in Canada — it gets freakin’ hot.

    According to a Fox sideline reporter, the on-field temperature prior to the opening game between Canada and China was 120 degrees.

    And it might have been even warmer if the temperature gauge had a larger range.

    Actually, the air temperature in Edmonton — the site of the opening games — was a pleasant 75 degrees. But when plastic and rubber — the two core ingredients to artificial turf — sit under direct sunlight for several hours, it gets a tad bit toasty.

    While players aren’t likely to burn themselves on the turf during normal gameplay, the radiating heat will ultimately take a toll on fitness at the tournament treks on.

    The use of artificial turf was seen as

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  • FIFA website identifies female World Cup players with male pronouns

    The FIFA website did not have a great start to the Women’s World Cup on Saturday when its gamecast — the live play-by-play of each game — used male pronouns to identify the female players in the Canada-China game.

    That’s right, several players were referred to as “he” or “his” for the opening game of FIFA’s largest women’s tournament ever.

    FIFA’s social media manager said the error was due to a bug and it was fixed for the tournament’s second game between Netherlands and New Zealand.

    This is just another blemish for a soccer organization that has struggled with its relationship with the women’s game. In 2004, then-FIFA president Sepp Blatter said female players would bring more attention to their game if they wore tighter shorts.

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  • Christine Sinclair's PK secures World Cup-opening win for Canada

    Christine Sinclair prevented Canada from flopping in its opening game of the FIFA Women’s World Cup by slotting a penalty kick into the side netting and securing a 1-0 victory against China in stoppage time.

    [Women's World Cup: Latest news | Scoreboard and Schedule | Groups and Teams]

    Sinclair's penalty kick came after Zhao Rong mauled Adriana Leon two minutes into stoppage time. After that, it was merely a formality for Sinclair, who is Canada’s all-time leading scorer.

    Sinclair’s goal was the latest go-ahead goal in regulation in Women's World Cup history.

    It saved what could have been a huge stumble for the Canadians, who are favored to advance out of Group A and make a run in the tournament. The host nation dominated the game, but just couldn’t get past goalkeeper Wang Fei, who made three saves and saw a Canadian shot glance off the crossbar in the first half. In fact, one of the best opportunities for the Canadians came from Sinclair in the 82nd minute when she tried to finesse

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  • Texas A&M RB Brandon Williams moves to CB

    Texas A&M running back Brandon Williams (1) finds running room against Louisiana Monroe in the first half of an NCAA college football game, Saturday, Nov. 1, 2014, in College Station, Texas. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)Texas A&M running back Brandon Williams (1) finds running room against Louisiana Monroe in the first half of an NCAA college football game, Saturday, Nov. 1, 2014, in College Station, Texas. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)Texas A&M running back Brandon Williams is experimenting with a position change.

    Coach Kevin Sumlin announced during a fan event Thursday night that the former five-star back would move to cornerback this summer.

    “He can always come back and play running back, we know that,” Sumlin said, according to the Houston Chronicle. “Let’s see what he can do, and he’s excited about it. If he can help us (on defense), and it helps him in his career, it will be a great move for both of us.”

    Williams, an Oklahoma transfer, has been a sparse contributor at running back for the Aggies in his two seasons with the program. Senior Tra Carson and sophomore James White are the top backs on the depth chart.

    However, cornerback is a hole in the Aggies defense and could be an opportunity for Williams to see more playing time. And as a senior, it might be a way for Williams to draw the attention of pro scouts.

    “(Brandon Williams) has got average size at 6 foot and 195 or 200 pounds for a running back, maybe

    Read More »from Texas A&M RB Brandon Williams moves to CB
  • C-USA announces UAB will remain a member of its conference

    UAB’s status as a member of Conference USA is secure.

    In a statement Thursday, Conference USA announced it would not take any action against UAB now that it has reinstated football. That means all Blazers sports get to keep their spot in the conference even though football is not likely to field a team until 2017, according to athletic director Mark Ingram.

    "In light of UAB's decision to reinstate football, the board took no action to affect UAB's membership status in the conference," C-USA said in a statement. "At its fall meeting, the Board expects UAB to submit for review a comprehensive plan addressing the key elements of UAB's football program going forward. No additional action from the Board is expected until that time."

    UAB’s status with the conference was in jeopardy if Blazers didn’t reinstate its football program. Conference bylaws mandate its members have an FBS-level football program or be in the process of working toward one.

    Ingram told AL.com that the Blazers might not

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  • A solid foundation at UAB will build sustainable success

    File - In this Saturday, Jan. 3, 2015, file photo, an UAB fan declares his loyalty for the terminated football program at the Birmingham Bowl NCAA college football game between Florida and East Carolina, in Birmingham, Ala. UAB president Ray Watts is bringing the football program back. He told The Associated Press that he decided on Monday, June 1, 2015 to reverse the earlier decision after meetings with UAB supporters continued through the weekend. He says donors have pledged to make up the estimated $17.2 million deficit over the next five years if football is restored. (AP Photo/Butch Dill, File)File - In this Saturday, Jan. 3, 2015, file photo, an UAB fan declares his loyalty for the terminated football program at the Birmingham Bowl NCAA college football game between Florida and East Carolina, in Birmingham, Ala. UAB president Ray Watts is bringing the football program back. He told The Associated Press that he decided on Monday, June 1, 2015 to reverse the earlier decision after meetings with UAB supporters continued through the weekend. He says donors have pledged to make up the estimated $17.2 million deficit over the next five years if football is restored. (AP Photo/Butch Dill, File)When UAB president Ray Watts announced Monday that the university was reinstating its football program six months after it disbanded it, there was a huge sense of pride by the Birmingham community.

    From the day Watts announced the program was leaving to the day he announced it was coming back, students, fans, boosters, alumni and former players banded together in a grassroots effort to secure the money to float the program for the next five years and create a strong foundation for the program moving forward.

    “It’s just a very unprecedented situation, but it’s also a very optimistic situation,” Justin Craft, former player and head of UAB’s Football Foundation, told Yahoo Sports. “I think UAB’s gonna get a chance to do things the right way and make the investment that, for whatever reason, had not been made in the last 10 years. And I think once that happens, it’s just going to build on the momentum that’s here now. It’s a very exciting day for me as a former player and alumni and I’m

    Read More »from A solid foundation at UAB will build sustainable success

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