Don Landry

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Don Landry is a blogger for Yahoo Canada Sports.

  • Chicago pitcher Chris Sale. (Associated Press)Chicago pitcher Chris Sale. (Associated Press)
    Chris Sale. Good fashion sense. Bad problem-solving skills.

    Did he really find those throwback Chicago White Sox jerseys so reprehensible that he had no choice but to rid the clubhouse of their disco era presence? Maybe. But when the Chicago White Sox ace gave those jerseys a radical redesign with a knife, on Saturday, it was more like a dismayed lover tossing a new ex's belongings out onto the lawn in a climax of relationship decay. It's not about the stuff, actually. Sure, those 1976 inspired White Sox uni's were god-awful and bringing them back into the light is kind of like asking Ben Affleck and Jennifer Lopez to do a remake of Gigli. Sale's rocky relationship with the White Sox pre-dates all of this, though and his Norman Bates attack on the jerseys will go down as a symptom of the problems - not the cause - as Sale makes his way out of Chicago in the near future.

    A limerick, just for Chris Sale:

    There once was a pitcher named Sale. Against throwbacks with collars he'd rail. He

    Read More »from Monday Musings: There once was a petulant southpaw...
  • Monday Musings: I guess that was pretty good, Phil

    Henrik Stenson and Phil Mickelson discuss getting Almost Shot 62 jackets as they walk off the 18th at Royal Troon. (Getty)Henrik Stenson and Phil Mickelson discuss getting Almost Shot 62 jackets as they walk off the 18th at Royal Troon. (Getty)

    Phil Mickelson builds a shed in his backyard. He buys the best possible materials that he can, and meticulously uses top-notch equipment in a skilful display to fashion all of the the pieces together. He measures twice and cuts once. His keen eye and steady hands mean it's a perfectly square foundation, with strong, steady walls and a soaring peaked roof that is exactly, I mean exactly, 90 degrees at its apex. Not only is Phil a master carpenter, but he is also a skilled electrician. He wires that shed up and its lights blaze with the power of the constellations. Then, as the neighbours look on in increasing amazement, Phil paints that shed a glorious hue, one that defies description here, so that it gleams in the sun. He finishes by painting an immaculate, Louvre-worthy fresco on the side of his shed and then affixes a marvellous, golden rooster weather vane - one that he hand forged himself - to the top of that shed. Man, that shed looks fantastic. It's a gorgeous shed and all the

    Read More »from Monday Musings: I guess that was pretty good, Phil
  • Monday Musings: Fist pump, fist pump, fist pump!

    In the end, I don't think winning Wimbledon was the best news Andy Murray got on Sunday. Murray likes to fist pump and he sure lets a lot of them fly. He did that again during his straight sets win over Milos Raonic, to be sure.

    But his most emotional, jacked up fist pump might just have come in the aftermath, as he lugged his trophy all around the clubhouse at the All-England Lawn Tennis Club. Meeting actor Benedict Cumberbatch, who had been a guest in the royal box during the final, Murray asked him what he was up to. When BeneBatch replied that he was shooting upcoming episodes of "Sherlock," Murray greeted the news with the heartiest of pumps. Guy's carrying the championship trophy from his sport's greatest tournament, moments after he wins it and he gets stoked that there are new episodes of "Sherlock" coming? Can't blame him, really. That is a damn good show.

    Then again, maybe Murray fist pumps over everything. Make a good shot? Fist pump. Win Wimbledon? Fist pump. Score a great

    Read More »from Monday Musings: Fist pump, fist pump, fist pump!
  • Monday Musings: I had a dream, I had an awesome dream

    Steven Stamkos: Opting for comfort food. (Getty)Steven Stamkos: Opting for comfort food. (Getty)
    I had a very strange dream over the weekend.

    In it, P.K. Subban, Taylor Hall and Steven Stamkos are dining together at an upscale restaurant. Everything seems perfectly normal except that Subban is wearing a cowboy hat and strumming a banjo. Hall is smoking a cigar and working on his pronunciation of the phrase "fuhget aboud it." Nearby, general managers Ray Shero and David Poile are laughing, sporting "Shark Week" T-shirts. Stamkos is studying the menu intensely for what seems an eternity, unable to make a decision on an entrée. "Hmmm," he begins, "so much to choose from. I feel adventurous."

    Three waiters who look suspiciously like Brendan Shanahan, Tim Murray and Ken Holland are all talking at once, trying to convince Stamkos to try their suggestions. Stamkos is politely listening but then shakes his head and utters: "Just give me the usual." A tuxedo-wearing Steve Yzerman steps forward, with a towel draped over his arm and replies "very good, sir."

    At the next table, New England

    Read More »from Monday Musings: I had a dream, I had an awesome dream
  • Scene: Some staggeringly picturesque countryside located in the British Columbia interior. We zero in on a gorgeous mansion where, at the foot of a walkway near the grand entrance, a 26-year-old man stands, waiting anxiously. A limousine pulls up. It will not be the last. Out of that car steps a middle aged man wearing a perfectly tailored suit, a red tie and pocket square popping brightly. As he steps toward the younger man, he ostentatiously fiddles with three championship rings on his fingers. He is Ken Holland, general manager of the Detroit Red Wings. "Hello, Mr. Holland, welcome to the mansion," says the young man. That young man is Steve Stamkos, of course. "I'm so nervous," says Holland as he shakes Stamkos' hand and then throws a shady look at the next limousine which arrives quickly after his own. As Holland walks towards the front door, Buffalo Sabres' GM Tim Murray gets out of his limo, smiling broadly as the briefcase he's carrying springs open, its contents of large,

    Read More »from Monday Musings: A Stamkos reality show, enough of "Shark Week," and let's all learn from McEnroe
  • Yay! Ron MacLean's back! That's puntastic!Yay! Ron MacLean's back! That's puntastic!

    It's arguable as to which game was more epic on Sunday night: The one of thrones or the one of NBA Finals. Seems fans of both basketball and warrior carnage got their fill. You know, that late-game LeBron James block on Golden State's Andre Iguodala was so forceful, so vicious, and so completely dominating, it could have been spliced right into a Game of Thrones death and destruction scene without anyone noticing. The Warriors' Full Court Tickle strategy failed to pay off in game seven of the NBA Finals. (Slam Magazine Twitter photo)The Warriors' Full Court Tickle strategy failed to pay off in game seven of the NBA Finals. (Slam Magazine Twitter photo)Or perhaps even Thronies (that's what they're called, right?) would have watched it and labelled it quite unbelievable, even for a George R.R. Martin tale. At any rate, maybe the Golden State Warriors will be brought back to life in a later episode of the NBA.

    So, it's Vegas is it? The NHL hands out its player awards in Las Vegas this Wednesday, in a splashy show at the Hard Rock Hotel and Casino. The board of governors will meet as well to give the go ahead to an expansion team in the Nevada city. At least that's what they'd like you to believe. I don't - for a second -

    Read More »from Monday Musings: LeBron brings winter to Golden State, MacLean gets his perch back and it's about to go down in Vegas
  • Joe Thornton's beard: Structural miracle or rarity in need of protection? (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)Joe Thornton's beard: Structural miracle or rarity in need of protection? (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

    The San Jose Sharks' loss is the city of Ottawa's gain. Sure, the Sharks might have fallen short in their quest to win The Stanley Cup. With the post-season now behind them, though, it means Joe Thornton can shave that mighty beard of his and its remnants have already found a new home as the city of Ottawa will use it to fill that sinkhole that opened up not far from Parliament Hill, last week (some would say too far from Parliament Hill).

    "We'll have some left over when we're done," said Ottawa mayor Jim Watson, adding that the excess has already been designated for use as insulation as renovations at 24 Sussex Drive progress. There may be a bit of a snag, however. UNESCO will vote, today, on whether to declare Thornton's beard a World Heritage Site.

    John McEnroe is coaching Milos Raonic as the upcoming Wimbledon championships approach. British Tennis sent out this picture (below) of them together last week. I don't know exactly what McEnroe is saying to the young Canadian in this

    Read More »from Monday Musings: Thornton's beard to the rescue, Cuban says "pick me, pick me!" And when confetti cannons attack
  • Curling's broom summit: We've come a long way from corn and cocktails

    Sweeping goes under the microscope at the broom summit, in Ottawa this week. (Anil Mungal/Sportsnet)Sweeping goes under the microscope at the broom summit, in Ottawa this week. (Anil Mungal/Sportsnet)

    Holy Hackner, just what is going on here?

    The sport of curling is, this week, holding a "broom summit" in Ottawa, flush with high profile players, national and international organizers and equipment manufacturers, as well as members of Canada's scientific community.

    A broom summit. Yeah.

    Who would have ever imagined, prior to this past season, that such a thing would ever exist. I mean, who would have thought of that? "We need a broom summit," is something absolutely no one would have ever, ever said unless by "broom summit" they meant a bathtub filled with ice and Molson Canadian in Ed Werenich's hotel room.

    This, though, is a whole other thing with protractors and lasers and gauges. Lab coats and hypotheses and testing and probably hardly any beer at all. I might be wrong on that. For all I know, scientists might be the freakiest of party animals. I barely made it through high school so I hang with a different crowd.

    Those with big stakes in the game and those who possess the power

    Read More »from Curling's broom summit: We've come a long way from corn and cocktails
  • Ryan Harnden works the broom while his brother, E.J. watches at the 2016 Players' Championship. (Anil Mungal/Sportsnet)Ryan Harnden works the broom while his brother, E.J. watches at the 2016 Players' Championship. (Anil Mungal/Sportsnet)

    It's been a season unlike any other in curling.

    When the issue of new, more aggressive materials on broom heads first came to the fore last autumn, it ushered in a year of measures and counter-measures peppered with finger-pointing, accusations of cheating and of frustration. As well as charges of "corporate bullying." When a moratorium on one abrasive synthetic fabric was brought in, good old-fashioned hair brushes then became a target of new regulation. Now, a third wave of consternation. Because with virtually all teams using what's called "Top Gun" material on their broom heads (it's said to be less abrasive than the material banned earlier this season yet still of an aggressive nature), the World Curling Federation is poised to take some off-season action on regulating the game and the equipment used to play it more rigidly.

    With next month's "Broom Summit" looming, and many of the best players on the planet in Toronto to take part in The Players' Championship, it seemed a good

    Read More »from What to do about the broom? Top skips weigh in on curling's possible sweeping solutions
  • (L to R): Sarah Reid, Cathy Overton-Clapham, Vicki Adams and Eve Muirhead hoist the trophy after their 2016 Players' Championship win. (Anil Mungal/Sportsnet)(L to R): Sarah Reid, Cathy Overton-Clapham, Vicki Adams and Eve Muirhead hoist the trophy after their 2016 Players' Championship win. (Anil Mungal/Sportsnet)

     One skip positively owns The Players' Championship.

    The other had been fruitlessly chasing it through his entire career.

    For Scotland's Eve Muirhead, a win in Toronto has become almost an annual rite. For Brad Gushue, a Players' Championship victory had been as slippery as one at The Brier, the one great trophy that still eludes the 35-year-old from St John's.

    Gushue finally ended the Players' Championship drought, taking a 5-4 win over the 2015 winner, Brad Jacobs and his crew from The Soo.

    "We've put in the work, we're reaping some of the benefits right now," Gushue told Sportsnet's Joan McCusker immediately after the win.

    The win pushes Gushue and his teammates - Geoff Walker, Brent Gallant and Mark Nichols - to 97 on the season with a chance to hit the century mark at the season-ending Champions Cup, beginning April 26th. Once again, they are the number one ranked team on the planet according to the World Curling Tour's Order of Merit Standings (year-to-date).

    Muirhead and her

    Read More »from Muirhead continues her Players' Championship dominance while Gushue finally gets his first

Pagination

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