Don Landry

  • Like
  • Follow
Author

Don Landry is a blogger for Yahoo Canada Sports.

  • (Photo: Anil Mungal/Sportsnet)(Photo: Anil Mungal/Sportsnet)

    It's happening again.

    For the second time this season, the controversy swirling around broom heads used in the sport of curling has leapt to flame and this time it's over the use of hair.

    There are voices out there that say hair ought to be banned. In curling's season of sweeping scandal, some competitors are unhappy with how some others are using these broom heads.

    new video has surfaced on Facebook, put there by members of Team Minera Skifer (skipped by Markus Hoiberg), a Norwegian curling team. The video shows three similar draw shots being taken, brushed in different ways, including twice with new brush heads made of hair.

    Who needs directional fabric? This is us testing a newly changed hairbrush on standard ice conditons. 14,5 hog-to-hog and 4 feet of curl... well normally that is. World Curling Federation

    Posted by Team Minera Skifer on Monday, February 8, 2016

    The video is the source of some contention - you can see that just by perusing the comments underneath it on

    Read More »from Ban the broom, part II: Curling's season of sweeping discontent gets a sequel
  • (L to R) Manitoba's Matt Dunstone, Colton Lott, Kyle Doering and Rob Gordon pose with the spoils of their victory at the 2016 Canadian Junior Men's curling Championships in Stratford, Ontario. (Michael Burns/Curling Canada)(L to R) Manitoba's Matt Dunstone, Colton Lott, Kyle Doering and Rob Gordon pose with the spoils of their victory at the 2016 Canadian Junior Men's curling Championships in Stratford, Ontario. (Michael Burns/Curling Canada)

    Stratford, Ontario - Heading into the final of the Canadian Junior Men's Curling Championship, both teams knew there was a cardinal rule that could not be broken: Do not fall behind by a bunch, or you'll have a steep, almost impossible climb.

    When you have two teams with the ability to play takeouts the way these Manitoba and Northern Ontario Junior Men's teams can, getting too far back of the tail lights means the front runner can peel out of sight.

    That's precisely what happened in the final, won by Manitoba's Matt Dunstone, Colton Lott, Kyle Doering and Rob Gordon, by a score of 11-4, in eight ends.

    It was an impressive display by Dunstone and company, taking down Northern Ontario's Team Horgan a few days after the Copper Cliff Curling Club team had defeated Dunstone's Winnipeg crew during the round-robin.

    With a 7-2 lead after four ends, the outcome wasn't really in doubt, not with the way the young Manitobans can make rocks disappear in a blink.

    Had Northern Ontario kept it close

    Read More »from Manitoba's Dunstone as loud and powerful as a locomotive in taking Canadian junior curling title
  • Stratford Ont, Jan 31 2016. Canadian Junior Curling Championship. Nova Scotia skip Mary Fay (R), gets a hug from teammate Karlee Burgess after guiding her Chester, Nova Scotia squad to a 9-5 victory over British Columbia in the women's final. Teammate Kristin Clarke is at left. (Michael Burns/Curling Canada)Stratford Ont, Jan 31 2016. Canadian Junior Curling Championship. Nova Scotia skip Mary Fay (R), gets a hug from teammate Karlee Burgess after guiding her Chester, Nova Scotia squad to a 9-5 victory over British Columbia in the women's final. Teammate Kristin Clarke is at left. (Michael Burns/Curling Canada)

    Stratford, Ontario - In the end, Nova Scotia's victory at the Canadian Women's Junior Curling Championship was like a crappy flight to The Bahamas. The mid-flight turbulence you endure is god awful. But in the end, you're, you know, in The Bahamas.

    With a good start, and a better finish, the Nova Scotia junior women, skipped by 17-year-old Mary Fay, came away with a decisive, 9-5 win over British Columbia, and their skip, Sarah Daniels, in a meandering game that certainly entertained the gathering at the Stratford Rotary Complex.

    “We knew they were going to fight back," said Fay, of a mid-game swoon that saw B.C. rally from three down to tie things up at 5 in the seventh end. "We just tried to stay confident and know that we were gonna get a break soon.”

    Still, things might have completely unravelled had B.C. scored a big steal in the eighth end, lying four with a couple of their stones in hard to reach places. It was then that Nova Scotia third Kristin Clarke made a turnaround shot

    Read More »from Nova Scotia junior women outlast the turbulence, win national curling championship
  • Jake (L) and Tanner Horgan at the 2016 Canadian Junior Curling Championships in Stratford, Ontario. (Curling Canada)Jake (L) and Tanner Horgan at the 2016 Canadian Junior Curling Championships in Stratford, Ontario. (Curling Canada)

    During the seventh end of Northern Ontario's Wednesday night win over Ontario at the Canadian Junior Curling Championships, 15-year-old Jake Horgan leapt from the hack at about a million miles and hour and then gave his rock an extra shove as he released it.

    Seconds later, blammo. Five stones were gone from play.

    It was something. Not the usual peel shot, I assumed. I was wrong, apparently.

    “That’s a normal peel weight," said Horgan after the game. "That's what I throw every time.”

    The Northern Ontario Junior Men's Curling Team has ridden shots like that all the way to a berth in this Sunday's final, to be held at the Stratford Rotary Complex in Stratford, Ontario. The team - with Maxime Blais at lead and Nick Bissonnette at second - has a powerful punch at vice with young Jake, and another one at skip in the form of Jake's 17-year-old brother, Tanner Horgan.

    With their father, Gerry, serving as coach, the Horgans might just be on their way to world domination, along with their

    Read More »from Northern Ontario's Horgan brothers adding strong branches to family curling tree
  • Quebec skip Félix Asselin curls in a sling after suffering a ping-pong injury. (Curling Canada)Quebec skip Félix Asselin curls in a sling after suffering a ping-pong injury. (Curling Canada)

    Wait. What? Say that again?

    That might just be, of all the headlines I've ever written, my all-time favourite.

    In what will surely be one of the more memorable stories of the 2016 Canadian Junior Curling Championships, Quebec skip Félix Asselin led his team to an 10-9 win over New Brunswick on Thursday afternoon at the Stratford Rotary Complex in Stratford, Ontario.

    He did it a few hours after injuring himself - badly - in a ping-pong mishap.

    According to the story on Curling Canada's website, Asselin dislocated his shoulder while playing ping-pong at the team's hotel, on Wednesday night. That was either one really heavy ping-pong ball that hit him or one hell of a wicked smash he was attempting.

    “I’ve been playing (table tennis) every single day since we got here, and I was playing like I usually do,” Asselin told Curling Canada's Al Cameron. “Somehow it just happened. I went for a forehand and somehow it popped out.”

    According to Cameron's story, the 21-year-old Asselin wore a sling

    Read More »from Junior curler dislocates shoulder playing ping-pong. Curls in a sling, rallies from 6-1 deficit to win
  • Nova Scotia junior skip throws a smooth stone, plays a mean piano

    Nova Scotia junior skip Mary Fay keeps her eyes on a shot during the 2016 Canadian Junior Curling Championships in Stratford, Ontario. (Curling Canada)Nova Scotia junior skip Mary Fay keeps her eyes on a shot during the 2016 Canadian Junior Curling Championships in Stratford, Ontario. (Curling Canada)

    A lot of people say a lot of nice things about 17-year-old Nova Scotia skip Mary Fay.

    "She could be a Rhodes Scholar someday," said one observer this week at the Canadian Junior Curling Championships in Stratford, Ontario. "She's like a concert-level pianist," said another. "She could probably win the Nova Scotia Women's Championship right now," said someone else. "Well, she's the next one," said yet another, referring to Fay's obvious curling talents and bright future in the sport.

    A straight 'A' student and a level 9 Royal Conservatory of Music (RCM) pianist, Fay is trying to skip her home province to its first national junior championship since Jill Mouzar did it in 2004. So far, so good. Heading into Thursday night's draw, Fay and her teammates found themselves tied for top spot (with British Columbia) with a record of 7 and 1, with Fay being outshot by the opposing skip, percentage-wise, just once in those eight games.

    Regardless of this week's outcome, Fay will then head to

    Read More »from Nova Scotia junior skip throws a smooth stone, plays a mean piano
  • Members of the Nunavut Junior Men's curling team pose behind the scoreboard after their first ever win at a national championship. (L to R): Qamaniq Siksik, Tyson Komaksiutiksak, Javen Komaksiutiksak, Ryan Aggark and coach Sean Turriff. (Al Cameron/Curling Canada)Members of the Nunavut Junior Men's curling team pose behind the scoreboard after their first ever win at a national championship. (L to R): Qamaniq Siksik, Tyson Komaksiutiksak, Javen Komaksiutiksak, Ryan Aggark and coach Sean Turriff. (Al Cameron/Curling Canada)

    Well there's no stopping them now.

    On Tuesday night at the Canadian Junior Curling Championships, the women's team from Nunavut ended the territory's combined (both men and women) losing streak at 64 games, scoring Nunavut's first ever victory at the tournament. Less than 24 hours after that, the junior men's team, skipped by 20-year-old Qamaniq (pronounced COM-uh-nick) Siksik, got their maiden victory, scoring a nervous 9-6 decision over Northwest Territories.

    “It... It’s... It’s the best," said an obviously happy and relieved Siksik, overcome by the removal of a heavy weight from his shoulders. "I don’t know. I don’t know what to say.”

    Siksik had played with the team in 2013 and 2014 and had suffered through six straight losses at this year's event, meaning he'd been a part of 24 of the team's 33 straight defeats. This year's losses include a 23-1 decision to Alberta, an 18-1 decision against Nova Scotia and a 33-1 (yes, 33-1) loss to Manitoba in the opening draw.

    On Wednesday

    Read More »from Nunavut junior men's curling team rebounds from lopsided losses, ending 33 game losing streak
  • Junior women's curling team ends Nunavut's 64 game losing streak

    The Nunavut junior women's curling team scored an historic win in Stratford, Ontario. (L to R): Sadie Pinksen, Christianne West, Kaitlin MacDonald, Melicia Elizaga and coach Donald Mattie. (Al Cameron/Curling Canada)The Nunavut junior women's curling team scored an historic win in Stratford, Ontario. (L to R): Sadie Pinksen, Christianne West, Kaitlin MacDonald, Melicia Elizaga and coach Donald Mattie. (Al Cameron/Curling Canada)

    Nights are long this time of year in Nunavut, we all know that.

    But not as long as the losing streak that the territory's junior curling teams had been on. Had being the operative word.

    Since the Arctic territory was first invited to take part in the Canadian Junior Curling Championships, in 2013, both the young men's and young women's teams had failed to score a single victory over any opponent. Nine losses each in that first year, nine losses each in the second. And the third. Add an oh and five start for both again at this year's nationals in Stratford, Ontario. Do the math and you ring up a total of 64 straight losses.

    That streak, however, stopped on Tuesday night, with Nunavut's junior women scoring a decisive 7-3 win over Northwest Territories, in eight ends.

    They didn't celebrate like they won the whole thing, they didn't hoot and holler. They shook hands with the vanquished, hugged a bit and then assembled for a picture near the scoreboard, at the request of a Curling Canada

    Read More »from Junior women's curling team ends Nunavut's 64 game losing streak
  • John Epping (L) delivered a tour de force performance at the Canadian Open. (Anil Mungal/Sportsnet)John Epping (L) delivered a tour de force performance at the Canadian Open. (Anil Mungal/Sportsnet)

    Victories at the Grand Slam of Curling's Meridian Canadian Open were fashioned in entirely different ways, on Sunday, in Yorkton, Saskatchewan.

    For Team John Epping, it was a clinical, superb show of force, capped with the shooting wizardry of the skip, who dropped jaws every end. For Team Rachel Homan - the bullet train of women's curling in 2015, it was a scratch and a claw against the opposition as well as themselves.

    EPPING GETS HOT AND STAYS THAT WAY IN DEFEATING BRAD GUSHUE

    While Team Brad Gushue has been the most consistent foursome in the men's game so far this season, Toronto's Team John Epping has been the circuit's hottest rink over the last two or three weeks, capping a perfect week at the Canadian Open with a 7-4, seven end decision over Gushue.

    "I just think that everything's just starting to mesh and it feels very, very comfortable out there and we've been working really hard this season," Epping told Sportsnet's Joan McCusker just after the win.

    Epping, along with

    Read More »from Epping masterful while Homan squeaks out a victory at the Grand Slam of Curling's Canadian Open
  • Craig Savill (L) shares a laugh with E.J. Harnden during a tour event game last season. (Anil Mungal/Sportsnet)Craig Savill (L) shares a laugh with E.J. Harnden during a tour event game last season. (Anil Mungal/Sportsnet)
    He is one of the most charismatic players in the sport, so it is no surprise that the curling world is rallying around Craig Savill after the announcement that the 37-year-old is fighting cancer.

    In a story posted by TSN's Bob Weeks, Savill says that he is stepping away from the game as he gets ready for the treatments that will aim to rid him of Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

    With this battle ahead of him, Savill has had to leave his Nova Scotia team, skipped by Shawn Adams. It's a rink he joined just this season, after Savill and longtime skip Glenn Howard parted company last spring, when Howard decided to bring in his son, Scott, to play lead.

    Howard and Savill remain close, of course, after being teammates for a decade and a half, winning eight provincial championships and a couple of world titles together.

    “I was shocked,"

    Read More »from Curling world rallies around Craig Savill in light of his cancer diagnosis

Pagination

(347 Stories)