Chris Young

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Chris Young is a writer and editor with more than 30 years of experience covering a wide range of sports and news for the Toronto Star and the Globe and Mail, including seven World Cup finals and one glorious Euro 2004.

  • Raptors' Terrence Ross crying foul after buzzer-beater ruled no good

    “Clock malfunction” was the official explanation. The Raptors had another one.

    “That was just a bad call,” said Terrence Ross, after his two-dribbles-and-shoot heave appeared to beat the buzzer force overtime in Sacramento, then was ruled no good after a long replay review.

    Referee Mike Callahan ruled that Kings’ Demarcus Cousins had deflected the Raptors’ inbounds pass to Ross with 2.4 seconds left on the clock. The clock on the floor didn’t start until Ross touched it, though, and thus a disparity that in the referees’ reckoning allowed him too much time – in effect, Ross didn’t beat the buzzer after all and the Kings were 112-109 victors.

    From the Toronto Star:

    “First of all, the trigger was a clock malfunction,” [Callahan] told a pool reporter. “We had the ball deflected, and the clock didn’t start.”

    Of course the Raptors weren’t having anything of it.

    “I knew I had at least two seconds,” Ross said. “I knew I could take a dribble and still get it off. I don’t know how a tipped ball

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  • Blue Jays' 'sustainability' mantra faces test with Bautista, Encarnacion on way out


    So it appears all done save for the teeth-gnashing: farewell, Edwing, and Joey, thanks for the bat flip.

    And just like that, a pairing with 17 seasons of memorable, even show-stopping Toronto sports history between them ends not with a bang but a bit of rather mundane paper-shuffling.

    Mind you, with the window shutting late Monday afternoon on the possibility that Jose Bautista and Edwin Encarnacion might accept the club’s qualifying offers – a formal exercise that never was going to conclude any differently – they’re not quite ex-Jays but certainly un-Jays, out there on baseball’s free agent catwalk and posing for offers to roll in matching their own estimations (and therein, at least in Bautista’s case, may lie the only meager sliver of hope of this being something other than a g’bye).

    All this was foreseeable, perhaps even unavoidable a year ago, when the turnover of the Toronto front office brought in baseball boss Ross Atkins and club president Mark Shapiro. Their word clouds

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  • Remarkable Heather Moyse goes into World Rugby Hall of Fame

    Heather Moyse of Canada scores a try during the Women's Rugby World Cup 2010 Pool C Match between Canada and Scotland at Surrey Sports Park on August 20, 2010 in Guildford, England. (Photo by Phil Cole/Getty Images)
    Heather Moyse of Canada scores a try during the Women’s Rugby World Cup 2010 Pool C Match between Canada and Scotland at Surrey Sports Park on August 20, 2010 in Guildford, England. (Photo by Phil Cole/Getty Images)

    Add another accolade to the remarkable sports resume of multi-talented Heather Moyse.

    A double gold medalist at the Winter Olympics in bobsled and a national team cyclist, the 38-year-old Prince Edward Islander’s first international sporting love was rugby – so it seems somewhat fitting that she’s among this year’s 12 inductees to the World Rugby Hall of Fame, the sports governing body World Rugby announced Monday morning.

    Moyse joins 2011 inductee Gareth Rees as the only Canadians in world rugby’s shrine in Rugby, England, which will be the scene for induction ceremonies on Nov. 17.

    Moyse made 22 international appearances for Canada in 15s and starred in two Women’s Rugby World Cups (2006 and 2010), scoring a tournament-best seven tries in each. After breaking her right

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  • Plenty of motivation for TFC's Giovinco, snubbed on two continents

    At this point, Toronto FC coach Greg Vanney maybe should consider sending his Italian counterpart Gian Piero Ventura a thank-you note.

    Not that Sebastian Giovinco needs any more fuel to his considerable fire, but he’s certainly getting it. Ventura, the Azzurri head coach, squirted lighter fluid all over it on Monday in Florence, when he said that in effect, MLS just isn’t a league he takes seriously enough to include Giovinco in his squad for this international break – and seemingly, any international breaks to come.

    201611061929701718951So let’s call the roll on the Atomic Ant:

    Good enough for North America – “a league that doesn’t count for much,” in the withering in-translation assessment of Ventura. Not good enough for Italy.

    Good enough – to bamboozle MLS defences for a second straight year, including four goals during a 7-0 home and way dismantling of NYC FC and old pal Andrea Pirlo in their latest playoff round. Not good enough to merit a spot in the league’s final three for this year’s MVP, an

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  • A whole new Game Plan as COC partners with Smith School of Business

    Over a near two-decade career as one of the most decorated Paralympians in history, Benoit Huot has by necessity and more latterly by design had to be as much entrepreneur as athlete.

    It should come as no surprise, then, that Huot was among the first in Canadian sports to apply for a brand-new program that partners the Canadian Olympic Committee and Queen’s University’s Smith School of Business in offering full scholarships worth up to $95,000 annually to the country’s Olympic athletes who qualify into the Kingston school’s MBA program. Like any of the Montreal para-swimmer's peers in about any sport, the world after his competitive career is over has become more and more an issue. The program with the Smith School, among the top in North American business schools, aims to add an educational plank to the COC’s Game Plan initiative announced in 2015, offering as many as 154 scholarships a year over the next eight years in four different MBA programs, including a degree of flexibility

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  • Christine Sinclair & soccer mates score with venture aimed at youth, business

    Christine Sinclair and Diana Matheson of Canada celebrate after defeating Brazil in Rio. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker Christine Sinclair and Diana Matheson of Canada celebrate after defeating Brazil in Rio. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker

    For four key members who between them cover the rise of Canada’s women’s soccer program to national prominence, it’s a brand new game – but one they’re quite used to.

    The foursome of Christine Sinclair, Diana Matheson, Rhian Wilkinson and retired goalkeeper Karina LeBlanc have partnered up in a venture called iS4 – as in “I Strive Four” – including the support of Canadian Tire’s Jumpstart program. Although they’ve been doing soccer camps together since winning a bronze medal in London four years ago, a press conference today in Burnaby, B.C., along with a camp for 100 children and participation in this week’s Sports Leadership Summit in nearby Richmond amounts to an official christening and taking it to the next level for years to come.

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  • Pinball Clemons: Head of the 2016 Canada's Sports Hall of Fame class

    Among the seven luminaries brought together Tuesday in Toronto for induction day into Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame, it seemed only fitting that Michael Clemons – Pinball, to the world – would serve as unofficial valedictorian.

    The class of 2016 comprises men and women from across the spectrum in both official languages and a variety of pursuits – history makers and boundary breakers, from Clemons’ designated “captain” (Summer and Winter Olympian Sue Holloway), inspirational figure (Paralympian Stephanie Dixon) and humanitarian (Dr. Frank Hayden of Special Olympics renown), and on through hockey’s Bryan Trottier, speed skater Annie Perreault and curler Colleen Jones.

    Just where Clemons fits among such company, he didn’t say – the record suggests, practically demands head of the class. At mid-life (51) and nine years out of a locker room where he won three Grey Cups as a player and one as a head coach, he remains an organizer, a champion, a motivator for change – ever the activist,

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  • Toronto FC head into MLS playoffs with a little more than just winning at stake

    At least within the tight and unique confines of Major League Soccer, things are on the uptick for Toronto FC.

    Full house? Wednesday night against the Philadelphia Union, TFC hosts its first playoff game, so it’s safe to check that box.

    Superstar player? Sebastian Giovinco, the league’s MVP last year in his first MLS season, worked a full shift on the weekend for the second time after seven weeks away, and made an impact:

    Supporting cast? Behind Giovinco they have American internationals Michael Bradley (with rumours of a Serie A move ahead) and Jozy Altidore, having found a nice vein of goal-scoring form the second half of the season. Behind those two top-dollar players they have assembled a defence that’s light years ahead of last year’s shot-with-holes bunch, and an overall group that affords head coach Greg Vanney som tactical versatility.

    Championship contender? Here’s the riddle, though we really just answered that with Giovinco’s status, after time out with injury showed their

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  • Toronto Maple Leafs' centennial season-ticket packaging catches the eye

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    The Toronto Maple Leafs have among the most championship-starved fans in pro sports -- that goes for the other teams in the MLSE stable, too, though they haven’t had 49 years and counting since their last meal -- but say one thing for the organization: when it comes to pomp and circumstance, they don’t scrimp.

     

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    Take this centennial season’s season-ticket-holders' package. As ever, each one carries an eye-popping price (in 2015, exclusive of those exorbitant license fees, they averaged out to between $41 and $207 a game, according to a 2016 court ruling). But in this season's case, each tells its own story from the days of WW1-era Canada through King Clancy and Keon and up to Auston Matthews. The very thought of tearing these tickets, old-school style, seems almost desecration. In an era of bar-code readers they’re made as much for stowing away with your other keepsakes as they are to get you in the arena while making the MLSE vaults bulge a little more.

     

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    "It is a keepsake. It's

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  • Gretzky: 'I don't know if a guy like Paul Coffey or myself could play in this era'

    Today's NHL is bigger and faster than the league he dominated a generation ago, but it's also more systems-oriented, even "robotic," says Wayne Gretzky, and he has doubts if the trailblazing and creative approach he and his fellow Edmonton Oilers of the 1980s employed would fit in to this era.

    In an interview Tuesday night with Peter Mansbridge for CBC's 'The National' on the eve of another NHL season, Gretzky noted that while "the game's better because the players are better," the way hockey is being coached leaves little room for imagination.

    "It's very much more robotic because it's more systematic now," he said. "There's too much at stake, not only for obviously the NHL teams, but junior teams, college teams. If you go to a peewee hockey game here in Toronto probably these coaches are systematic now – you play left wing, you play your position. You play right wing, you play your position.

    "I don't know if a guy like Paul Coffey or myself, we could play in this era because our

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Pagination

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